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The official CELINE thread

Jabbathecunt

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Hedi only released 3 fragrances in the now Maison Christian Dior line: Eau Noire, Cologne Blanche, and Bois d’Argent. Cologne Blanche got discontinued. Eau Noire got tweaked a bit and became limited distribution. Bois d’Argent got tweaked and is still part of their lineup. I will test the current version of Bois d’Argent on skin to see how it differs from the original in the next couple of days and report back.

For the prestige tier, he released Dior Homme,
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Dior Homme Cologne (my speculation),
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and Fahrenheit 32.
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Dior Homme Intense and Eau Sauvage Fraicheur Cuir were also launched in 2007 which suggests that Hedi might have had to approve of it late 2006 and early 2007 before he left Dior Homme, but I haven’t smelled either to see if it reflects his style. Dior Homme got tweaked and is now called Dior Homme Original and also limited distribution. Dior Homme Cologne got discontinued and replaced with a new fragrance with the same name in a white bottle. Fahrenheit 32 and Eau Sauvage Fraicheur Cuir got discontinued. Dior Homme Intense got tweaked and is still available in most places, but never where I’ve been.

Now with all that said, it has only ever been confirmed on record that Hedi was involved with Dior Homme and Fahrenheit 32. Hedi doesn’t even mention Dior Homme Intense in the Celine interviews. The only reason I would consider Dior Homme Cologne an Hedi release is because it shares the same neroli idea as Parade which would suggest that Hedi was behind Dior Homme Cologne’s creation as well, but I have zero evidence to back this up. Just based in reviews of Dior Homme Intense it seems like it strays too far from Hedi’s style and is too gaudy. I’m not a fan of Eau Sauvage so I don’t really care about the Fraicheur Cuir flanker. Although Fahrenheit 32 is positioned as a flanker to Fahrenheit, it is an entirely new fragrance and only distantly related. That’s the only reason I think I like it, as I’m not a fan of Fahrenheit either.

Moral of the story is that after Hedi left, all his fragrances either got tweaked, or discontinued. So I get it when Hedi says his fragrances are esoteric. I wouldn’t deter people from trying the modern versions of Eau Noire, Bois d’Argent, and Dior Homme Original.

What’s interesting is that although I liked the smell of all of Hedi’s Dior fragrances, I never liked wearing a lot of them out. Eau Noire is brooding, intense, and arrogant. Bois d’Argent leans more warm and elegant than how I usually dress despite having this magnetic drydown. Cologne Blanche feels a bit too “soft” and cozy for how I usually dress despite being my 10/10 scent, so I love wearing it to bed. Dior Homme feels like it is trying to be too sexy. Fahrenheit 32 is quite intense with the sporty vibe and vanilla sweetness. I ended up mostly wearing Dior Homme Cologne out while reserving the rest for when I'm at home. This is why I’m glad to add his Celine fragrances to my collection. I can see myself wearing Parade, Cologne Française, Eau de Californie, and Reptile more regularly than his Dior fragrances. Nightclubbing would be my guilty pleasure.
Bois d'Argent was my absolute favorite. This line was their most expensive and exclusive fragrance collection at the time and only available at the boutique. They sold a whole range of accessories for the fragrances including a $300 silver lid and travel trunk for the fragrances.
 

thorns

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Bois d'Argent was my absolute favorite. This line was their most expensive and exclusive fragrance collection at the time and only available at the boutique. They sold a whole range of accessories for the fragrances including a $300 silver lid and travel trunk for the fragrances.
Hedi was one of the first to pioneer the idea of exclusive fragrances for luxury designer brands back in 2004. Now almost every designer brand has an exclusive line. Cologne Blanche just melts me and almost short circuits my brain. I'm starting to notice the same effect in Parade, where I just have to stop everything, when the smell hits, to close my eyes. Might be too dangerous to wear out. The price of Dior Homme Cologne on the secondhand market rivals Parade now. Initially, I thought about getting a backup bottle of Dior Homme Cologne because I'm familiar with it, and how it feels like the older brother of Parade, but Parade might hit the pleasure centres in my brain more. I never noticed this sensation with Dior Homme Cologne. Dior Homme Cologne is nice and enjoyable, but Parade is pleasurable.

Single perfume cases for 100 mL and 200 mL bottles. Makes sense for traveling. Tan leather is an important colour for Celine.
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I am curious about the logic on how they decided on the sizes for these cases. Five 100 mL fragrances or three 200 mL fragrances. Three is a powerful number, and Hedi says he mostly wears Parade, Black Tie, and Reptile. At Dior, he also decided to release three fragrances in their exclusive line. What about three 100 mL bottles? I wonder if five was an arbitrary number chosen. I guess 9 is going to be a rare number since most customers won't likely go for the full set. Psychologically, I almost feel like those who would go for the full set are more likely to get a travel case. I guess the travel case might also encourage customers to buy enough to fill the case.
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SirGrotius

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Excellent discussion. Bois d’argent is easily my favorite Dior fragrance. I tend to wear it in New York when fully tailored out. That said it is strong and impactful so Dior Homme is a more practical competitor for daily wearer.

I have a few others such as leather oud or oud ispahan iirc but don’t touch them as they can provoke a touch of headache or nausea in me!
 

thorns

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Excellent discussion. Bois d’argent is easily my favorite Dior fragrance. I tend to wear it in New York when fully tailored out. That said it is strong and impactful so Dior Homme is a more practical competitor for daily wearer.
I can totally see the Celine SAs rocking Bois d'Argent. There is some warmth in their pinstripe shirt with one button unbuttoned.
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It makes a lot of sense when paired with a tan trench coat.
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Although the scent leans elegant, I don't think it feels uptight.
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I can understand Bois d'Argent paired with a darker look if the wearer wants to give themselves an olfactory filter of a golden hue around their presentation as a contrast to balance out the edginess of a dark look.
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I would consider it a nice option to dress up a more casual look. There is a slight clash which I think adds a layer of mysteriousness.
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Personally I find myself gravitating to Bois d'Argent when I wear a denim shirt with a blazer and black skinny jeans. The drydown that is left on my shirt collar is mesmerizing.
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All that said, I feel like Cologne Française being a bit darker and less warm is an even better fit for my overall style, but I'll have to wear it a bit more to really get a feeling of it.
 

thorns

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Supposedly from the perfumer Hedi enlisted to create Bois d'Argent:
“Hedi Slimane, the artistic director of Dior Homme, had commissioned three colognes for three masculine personas, and listed materials he loved, such as incense, liquorice, lavender… then he let us do our jobs. He’s a creator. He trusted the perfumers. I guess he’d asked for me because he’d smelled Lolita, but I’d already worked on the liquorice-lavender accord in the masculine Lolita. Francis Kurkdjian ended up doing the liquorice in Eau Noire. I only sent one submission, for what became Bois d’argent, adding vanilla to the incense he’d asked for. As it was meant to be for a dandy, I’d called it Alfred, after the poet Alfred de Musset."
Alfred de Musset
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By the time he reached the age of 20, his rising literary fame was already accompanied by a sulphurous reputation fed by his dandy side.
He was a well-known figure in brothels and is widely accepted to be the anonymous author-client who beat and humiliated the author and courtesan Céleste de Chabrillan, also known as La Mogador.
I've always wondered what are dandies. I see how they're often "content creators". Plays, poetry, and music is what they spend their time on.

Charles Baudelaire defined the dandy, in the later "metaphysical" phase of dandyism,[5] as one who elevates æsthetics to a living religion,[6] that the dandy's mere existence reproaches the responsible citizen of the middle class: "Dandyism in certain respects comes close to spirituality and to stoicism" and "These beings have no other status, but that of cultivating the idea of beauty in their own persons, of satisfying their passions, of feeling and thinking .... Dandyism is a form of Romanticism. Contrary to what many thoughtless people seem to believe, dandyism is not even an excessive delight in clothes and material elegance. For the perfect dandy, these things are no more than the symbol of the aristocratic superiority of mind."
I resonate with the idea of cultivating the idea of beauty in myself.

By the mid-19th century, the English dandy, within the muted palette of male fashion, exhibited minute refinements—"The quality of the fine woollen cloth, the slope of a pocket flap or coat revers, exactly the right colour for the gloves, the correct amount of shine on boots and shoes, and so on. It was an image of a well-dressed man who, while taking infinite pains about his appearance, affected indifference to it. This refined dandyism continued to be regarded as an essential strand of male Englishness."
I prefer a more muted less over-the-top style than what is traditionally associated with dandies.

George Walden, in the essay Who's a Dandy?, identifies Noël Coward, Andy Warhol, and Quentin Crisp as modern dandies.[23] The character Psmith in the novels of P. G. Wodehouse is considered a dandy, both physically and intellectually. Agatha Christie's Poirot is said to be a dandy.
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Out of this list of modern dandies, I think I only relate with Andy Warhol's style. Based on all of this, it is not hard to imagine that Hedi would be considered a dandy too.
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Hedi's take on dandyism:
Parade refers to dandyism and how to present oneself to the world. Do you like the term "dandy" and does it look like you? Does the elegance of the street still exist?

I have always been sensitive to the ritual, to the liturgy of appearances. Dandyism crystallized a large number of conventions in men's fashion. There is here the idea of the transmission, the legacy of the great historical dandies, of the nineteenth-century literature to pop and rock scenes since the 1960s. From Baudelaire to Huysmans and his hero, Des Esseintes, from Gainsbourg to Dutronc, through the Clash, Doherty and many others, still today, the dandies continue to paradoxically parade. By extension, the history of rock merges with the attributes of historical dandies. Parade was created on the very idea of transmission and the unchanging ritual of appearances. I also meet very often and photograph young musicians 18-20 years particularly sophisticated in London, Paris, and Los Angeles.
So I guess Hedi would lump together everyone who dresses up with more sophistication as being a dandy. The term dandy just carries so much baggage that it makes me wonder why Hedi chooses to use it. Maybe I'm just extra sensitive to the term.
 

pockets

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this fragrance discussion is fascinating, im personally not into it (sure, it smells good?) and have always been into the tactile and visual. great to see people enthusiastic about the slice of it im not into, understand how people experience and consume it. its like taking cream with coffee when i really just want the clothes black.
 
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thorns

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this fragrance discussion is fascinating, im personally not into it (sure, it smells good?) and have always been into the tactile and visual. great to see people enthusiastic about the slice of it im not into, understand how people experience and consume it. its like taking cream with coffee when i really just want the clothes black.
I agree with you and I don't think fragrances are essential. I treat it similar to accessories like necklaces, bracelets, and rings, all of which are optional.

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I do consider that everyone is a unique performance art piece, and that most people consider there being an audience to perform for when choosing what to wear. There is this idea of an audience that is being exposed to a visual performance, as if they're watching a play. But what if the play also includes an olfactory component to match the visual experience? Imagine you're watching a scene when the family wakes up in the morning to coffee, and you smell the aroma of roasted coffee beans being vented into the theatre. As an artist, should one consider introducing an olfactory component to the performance to enrich the audiences' experience? I don't think there is a right or wrong to that question. But it is worth considering.

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Yet even as he layers these visual elements, Mr. Teste hopes to draw people in by their noses, rather than their eyes. Mr. Kurkdjian’s three scents are released at various moments in the play. The first, a wet, mossy forest smell, disseminates as the last stragglers take their seats.
The second scent represents a fireplace. It’s not the cozy scent of a soul-warming hearth, Mr. Kurkdjian said, but a cold, marble fireplace after the flame has been extinguished. The soot and ash left behind is meant to help the audience “feel the sourness” of a conversation between a son and his father, whose sins this son disclosed to the entire family.
You can see how the aim is for the scent and visual experience to combine together to create something more than the sum of its parts to elicit a feeling from the audience.

While the first two scents are more smell-odor than fragrance-perfume, the third most closely resembles Mr. Kurkdjian’s commercial endeavors. Rather than representing nature, this scent is meant to be the perfume of the daughter who died — the one that she would have worn in life. It conjures her memory. The play ends on a note of peace and reconciliation, and a return to the forest scent.
Scents add an additional dimension to the overall experience that wouldn't be possible without the scent. When I recognized that I treat myself as a performance art piece, adding an olfactory element to my performance became a no brainer. But the question is then what fragrances should I choose?

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I never even considered the idea of matching fragrances with a fashion style. I always saw scent as a standalone object totally unrelated to fashion. Reading through Hedi's interviews, I started to understand how he builds his universe, and how everything he designs is all connected, from the architecture to photographs, clothing, accessories, and fragrances, which gave me a deeper appreciation of his vision.
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I feel like most fans buy into the narrative that Hedi creates, and the fragrances is how he imagines the characters in his universe smells like. I'm happy with Hedi's vision, so I can easily justify to myself that I would want to smell like how he imagines characters in his universe smells like. It doesn't interest me to reinvent the wheel and come up with my own unique scent. I trust in Hedi's good taste, and all I have to do is find what resonates with me in his universe, and luckily it wasn't difficult.

I don't think everyone needs to wear Hedi's fragrances, I'm merely suggesting to consider scent as a component of one's style. I also can see how one can purposefully choose to smell of no fragrance as part of their style. In my perspective, everyone is their own unique performance art piece, so I don't think there can be any right or wrong approach. I don't think I'll ever say something like, "You're not a real Hedi fan unless you also wear his fragrances." Everyone has to decide what's right for them.
 
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pockets

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thorns,

interesting, i appreciate what you mean by added dimension, and you cant deny the effect smell has on the brain. ive read all the bits that hedi has put out about fragrance, and frankly ive always been susceptible to his suggestion and products. love the perspective.
 

thorns

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All that said, I feel like Cologne Française being a bit darker and less warm is an even better fit for my overall style, but I'll have to wear it a bit more to really get a feeling of it.
The fruity fig is the opening absolutely delicious. Cologne Française probably has my favourite opening in the entire line. This element helps lift the fragrance up a bit so it doesn't become very dark when the slightly smokey woods and the musky creamy base comes in. There is an overall clean feeling to this fragrance, like many in the line, without smelling like laundry detergent. There is something in the base that reminds me of Sauvage's creamy, slightly mineral, and at time woody, base. There is overall an elegant feeling, but not uptight. Feels introverted paired with insouciance. I wouldn't mistake their introversion for meekness, however. There is an attitude present.
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It leans a bit more masculine/boyish, but a girl can rock it. She's a little bit of a tomboy and wears minimal makeup.
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The way she looks you up and down is hot.
 

thorns

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modern silhouette. Reptile would be a suitable choice for both.
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thorns

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Some Chinese netizens laughing at how often this cardigan has gotten an appearance. Celine trying to hype it. But, it is probably one of the better pieces for ss21 men's.
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