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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. harrysgame

    harrysgame Senior member

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    Bletsoe is in Northamptonshire and was a big soul venue from the early 60s along with Kelmarsh, The Tin Hat in Kettering and The Shades in Northampton . All big soul places in thouse days along with many others in the area. Everyone bangs on about Wigan and the Twisted Wheel ect. But Northampton had as big a scene as those venues but started earlier. Mostly i suspect due to the American air bases close by.
     
  2. Mr Knightley

    Mr Knightley Senior member

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    I have a contact who I am sure would love to help if need be. Let me know.
     
  3. harrysgame

    harrysgame Senior member

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    I repeat not all revival skinhead were of the punk variety. I know and knew many who were just as smart as any skinhead pictures i have seen from the 60s. I also have met some people who still claim to be skinheads from the original days who clearly have no idea how to dress smart.
    Its all genralisation. I have also seen some very smart and pretty sorts from the late 70s who dressed immacutely.
     
  4. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    I agree the later boneheads did look like punks and many of them would have been punks to start with....I know one thing for certain if i was 15 in 79 ...I would have been a bone head,:D
     
  5. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Just PM'd you.
     
  6. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    Burnley (a) 1968

    This match was played on 2nd March 1968 and was the first away match I went to. I traveled there with a Burnley supporting mate in his uncle's car with him and his auntie. They were all Clarets and I was the only Blue in the car. City were going great guns and there was lots of City traffic on the roads north that Saturday. The full significance of this didn't hit me until we entered the ground. Immediately on passing through the turnstile we were met with the sight of a fleeing Burnley fan being hunted down by 2 City fans who gave him a kicking and stole his scarf. In those days nearly everybody wore a football scarf and there was this practice of taking them from rival fans. The theory was if you defeated an enemy you took his scarf, in the manner of a Comanche taking a scalp from a vanquished foe. (That was the theory, anyway - in practice, I suspect that many of them were simply snatched when the wearer wasn't looking or taken by gangs from individuals - "Give us yer scarf!") I can remember seeing lads on the Kippax with 4 or 5 different scarves hanging from belt loops, epaulletes and wrists.

    Of course, at 13 years old I understood that these things happened but this was the first time I had witnessed it up close, only a few feet away. I reckon that almost half the people in Turf Moor were Blues as City completely took over the Long Side and the open end and certainly many a Burnley fan was relieved of his scarf that day, one way or another. I actually saw City fans selling some back to young Clarets later in the afternoon. The match was quite a tight affair as Burnley had been one of the top teams through the 60's and still boasted a number of internationals in their side. The encounter was settled by a Francis Lee goal and at the final whistle you could sense the growing belief in the City crowd as this was our fifth game undefeated, having won 3 and drawn one of our previous 4 matches.The Long Side had become a second Kippax and in one mass Blues moved across it like an army, towards the open end, the exits and home.

    Style note - at this time the look was short hair (not quite skinhead), surfer jackets (never known them to be called monkey jackets until joining this forum!) Levis and brogues.
     
  7. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Agreed.Plus I certainly would never have chosen that look for myself in '79.By that time there was just so many choices and availability of style to choose from that simply was not around ten years earlier.The Glam rock era had pushed the envelope and made a lot of unimaginable things acceptable.I' am friends with a number of people in the fashion business from Italy/Spain/US etc and they all cite London as the number one City for inspiration.We have such a rich History and back catalogue to plunder,and (generally) no longer feel the need to belong to any one particular style.I saw Bowie interviewed a number of years ago on the Jay Leno Show.Talking about the huge impact the U.K has on style ,he said something to the effect of "Yeah...stick two English boys in a room together and the conversation would probably go like - "Nice strides mate....Paul Smith ? "
    The Boneheads followed the quite common mistake of men buying and wearing clothes that are slightly too small for them to the extreme.In fact they took the whole look to the extreme and completely fcuked it up for me visually.The splattered bleached jeans probably was the hardest pill to swallow as they were an iconic item to us that were revered and cared for with the utmost respect.I suppose that was due to Punk?
     
  8. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    At the risk of opening up a can of worms......... I think people go on about The Twisted Wheel and then later, Wigan Casino, not because no-one else was playing Soul music, but because of the type of Soul they were playing.(Possibly also because they were among the very first "all - nighters") Whereas many clubs were playing the latest Soul sounds, in the north clubs were still playing a large number of sides from the mid sixties. Dave Godin noticed that people from "Up North" were trying to buy these types of records when visiting record shops in London and coined the term "Northern Soul". As we are all aware, "Up North" to some people refers to anywhere north of Luton! The Twisted Wheel opened in the early sixties and wasn't even the only Soul club in Manchester. Virtually every northern town had a Soul Club or at the very least a venue where this type of music was played, catering originally for mods, they continued through the skinhead era because the demand was still there. A lot of snobbery out there regarding "Northern Soul" . When we went out to Soul clubs the northern classics were played (now known as 60's Soul Club Classics) but so was Sam Cooke, The Crystals, Motown and other stuff that would be dismissed out of hand by "Northern Soul" fans today.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  9. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    That's a funny thought Lasttye because I was hanging around some Mods and druggies in the Midlands at that age !
    My first visit to the West End was also around that time - albeit in the safety of daytime.We got to go down to Wembley with the school for the Schoolboys International matches.needless to say that was nothing more than a shopping trip for us scallywags.We never saw a ball kicked.As soon as our teachers had left us on our own we shot off,about half a dozen of us ,'UP" the West End.First stop was Tottenham Court Rd and a visit to Contempo in Hanaway St.Then a couple of hours wandering the length of Oxford St in awe.When you think of the provincial towns we were from and then to be in Oxford St in those days,it was amazing.Take 6,Lord John,Ravel etc didn't exist in our world back up the M6.This started a trend for the next few years untill a couple of lads got nicked for shoplifting I believe and that put an end to it.I don't remember what year it was,but I recall buying a little bunch of Cherries that the Girls pinned on their coats,as a gift for my Sister.That was a big fashion item at the time,but it may have been 71 0r 72 I think?


    [​IMG]
     
  10. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    I remember reading his Column,in "Blues and Soul" and thinking W.T,F?It seemed to me(in the very early 70s) that People were going backwards in their choice of Music.I remember seeing the Adverts for Va Va`s in Bolton and others(with the Artists Names and Record Titles written around the edge of the Advert).Some of the Records I remembered from listening to Clubs in London-during the mid/late 60s.Not all played Chart Soul,and that was down to the American Servicemen then the laterJamaican Influence.I have one or two Blanks of Soul Records,made in Jamaica,that are not easily recognisable "Soul" Records.Owen Gray,Jackie Edwards and Jackie Opel(to name a few)made good Soul Records-that were heard in Jamaican Clubs.
     
  11. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    My Missus used to wear a Cherry Brooch like that-about `70/`71
     
  12. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Nothing pisses me off more than when I mention Stafford and Soul together and it immediately gets associated with post Wigan All nighters.There was a very good and healthy Soul scene going on in the clubs and youth centres years before.I personally never went to Wigan and was turned off by most of what I was hearing.Even kids from school who years earlier had took the piss out of me for my tastes were going up there.The notoriety of both The Wheel/Wigan and also the demise of others was Drugs.That's what got the headlines.The Wheel also had a reputation for the chance that you may well be relieved of some personal items on your way between the club and the Station.It happened more than once to lads I knew.
    Just like wearing a Sheepskin away to Everton !
     
  13. flyfronted

    flyfronted Senior member

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    The Soul / Jazz funk scene was huge in London / south east in 79 .. much better option and dressing smart in modern clobber much nearer to original skinhead ethos than Bonehead / Oi Oi scruffs.
     
  14. flyfronted

    flyfronted Senior member

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    Maybe they were BUT i dont remember ever seeing any Bonehead/ Revivalist kids in 79 who looked half decent - feel free to make me look stupid by putting up some pics .
     
  15. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    All the girls in our town had them.Funnily enough they all seemed to loose them around the same time?[​IMG]

    Couldn't resist that one browniecj !
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2013
  16. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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    I'm a musician.Soul music is one of my biggest influences(I can play it pretty well as well)First browniecj is correct.Jamaica made some great soul records.The B-side of "Israelites" is a great soul tune.Derrick Harriott does a song by Dan Penn.It's the only version of the song I've found.Winston Jones(the Gaylads)Put out a single mid 60's.One side is a C&W song and the other side is a slow soul ballad(west indians love C&W music)As far as Northern Soul,most of it was third rate indie label/studios imitating better stuff.The soul obsessives had found all the good records and started looking into the stuff that was less memorable etc.There is not an infinite amount of these records.Eventually they run out as only a certain number of tunes was recorded and pressed.Just my opinion.Not tryin to step on toes.Cheers
     
  17. flyfronted

    flyfronted Senior member

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    One thing i remember the older 15 something LOL Skinhead girls carrying was baskets .. small wooden ones in which they carried there school books ? WTF was that all about .
     
  18. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Mmmmm......Wicker ones?
    I very, very,vaguely recall my sister using one,but I think it was mainly used on days when she had a domestic Science class.Primarily to carry home the cooking experiments !
     
  19. TomMc666

    TomMc666 Senior member

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    can I ask, were you actually involved in anyway with the skinhead or mod revivals? How do you know what the ethos was? As for being a soulie or jazz funk, not a choice for many of us, too much like normal
     
  20. TomMc666

    TomMc666 Senior member

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    My post in response to your original post on this hasnt appeared yet.... anyway, what revival are you talking about? 77-79? 79-83? Or 84 onwards? Within each of these how you dressed - from skinhead to suedehead to mod to two tone/rude boy and to bonehead, depended on a number of factors including age, location and even politics. Many of the boneheads and even the two tone lot were much younger than us - we were 17-19 in 77 - and in 79 and 80 the media latched onto very simplistic images of both skinhead and mod and many young kids - under 15 and we certainly wouldnt want to be hanging about with them became one or the other (or both!). As for the punk crossover, the 77 skinhead revival in looks followed the original style but adopted Sham, Menace, Cocksparrer and the early incarnation of Skrewdriver. Many by 78 moved into the mod revival and in 79/80 had begun the change to proto-casual... We changed because to us it was a form of elitism, like the way we hunted down the old clothes and records in 77 and then started getting suits made etc. In 79 our enemy as well as Teds and Soulboys now included many of the boneheads and the political types.

    I suppose thats the issue, there wasnt just one revival and each year saw a number of different strands. Also many didnt want to be like the Teds and live in a museum, many took it and made their own interpretation

    As for the girls at the time, I agree from 79/80 onwards there was a more masculine look but in 77-78 there were quite a few in London who looked no different form the photos you mention - Bev, Toni and Julie are great examples.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2013

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