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Random Fashion Thoughts (Part 3: Style farmer strikes back) - our general discussion thread

g transistor

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Listening to Akuma No Uta as we speak... talk about variety!
akuma no uta is great. Check out Vein for hardcore, amplifier worship for drone/heavier metal rock type stuff, and of course their best album, Flood
 

gdl203

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Speaking about Byborre, I'm utterly confused by them. I tried to find what kinda stuff they were doing, but all I saw in every press release was innovation this, innovation that. No more musty grandma knits etc etc. I was trying to figure out if it had any technical elements to it's innovations, but didn't really see it besides some 8 bit knit which sounds like tech marketing babble more than anything. Does anyone know?
In a nutshell, they develop fabrics (first) and garments (second) using knitting as opposed to weaving. The knitting is programmed to create different weight and properties that work best for different garments or different parts of one garment (e.g. thinner stretchier parts under the arms, heavier textures for harder wearing parts). Borre’s revelation came when he was younger and worked for a mattress company in Denmark and after seeing the hypercomplex knitting machines that make the mattress tops. He realized those machines were dramatically more sophisticated than those for garments and that he could use them (with a lot of thought and development) to replace entirely the need for wovens
 

FlyingMonkey

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ByBorre are one of the few companies doing something genuinely innovative with manufacturing. It's great to see.
 

Bromley

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It seems like there was a lot more contrast between decades. 50s/60s/70s/80s are pretty recognizable fashion. Maybe the 90s too? Did fashion stop changing as much or am i too close to the graph paper to see the slope?
I've been thinking about this a lot lately, prompted by one of those tweets that hits on our collective feeling that the '90s were ten years ago, the '80s twenty years ago, etc. I wonder if it has to do with widespread HD photo and video of everything since around 2000. HD video and DSLR still photography have progressed, but you could see something on TV shot in 2005 that's indistinguishable from something shot yesterday. That's not necessarily the case across pre-2000 decades.

I just rewatched the Curb pilot (aired 15 years ago), and everything looks pretty much the same as it does today. Our cars look pretty much the same in design. Buildings and houses are almost the same. People on the news. Furniture, hair styles, the average person's clothes. I wonder if a lot of our cultural cues and visual reference points will be rooted in ~2000 for a while. Think of the style/design differences between 1975 and 1990? They're huge. But that's how far we are right now from the Curb pilot, or like, Fear Factor.
 

peachfuzzmcgee

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In a nutshell, they develop fabrics (first) and garments (second) using knitting as opposed to weaving. The knitting is programmed to create different weight and properties that work best for different garments or different parts of one garment (e.g. thinner stretchier parts under the arms, heavier textures for harder wearing parts). Borre’s revelation came when he was younger and worked for a mattress company in Denmark and after seeing the hypercomplex knitting machines that make the mattress tops. He realized those machines were dramatically more sophisticated than those for garments and that he could use them (with a lot of thought and development) to replace entirely the need for wovens
Thanks, I just couldn’t find a more technical reason, but that sounds cool. I’ll keep an eye on them, I only found them through a Kapital collar that although I thought was ugly, lead me to see what the company was about. I was initially put off because the over use of the word innovative generally makes my eyes roll and immediately makes me think of start up buzzwords.

Glad to see the hesitance was unfounded.
 

blacklight

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I've been thinking about this a lot lately, prompted by one of those tweets that hits on our collective feeling that the '90s were ten years ago, the '80s twenty years ago, etc. I wonder if it has to do with widespread HD photo and video of everything since around 2000. HD video and DSLR still photography have progressed, but you could see something on TV shot in 2005 that's indistinguishable from something shot yesterday. That's not necessarily the case across pre-2000 decades.

I just rewatched the Curb pilot (aired 15 years ago), and everything looks pretty much the same as it does today. Our cars look pretty much the same in design. Buildings and houses are almost the same. People on the news. Furniture, hair styles, the average person's clothes. I wonder if a lot of our cultural cues and visual reference points will be rooted in ~2000 for a while. Think of the style/design differences between 1975 and 1990? They're huge. But that's how far we are right now from the Curb pilot, or like, Fear Factor.
I was watching Fear Factor recently and was trying to think of today's equivalent to the whole barbed wire tattoo and over-slicked hair look.
 

dieworkwear

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Regarding whether fashion is changing, isn't every trendy look right now basically the "before" photo of every "before and after" photo pairing 10 years ago? Like "here's this dummy with wide pants" and "now here he is with slim pants."

Everything I see at Urban Outfitters, Celine, Balenciaga, Aime Leon Dore, etc is just a remixing of the 90s, which was very "out" in 2010. The prints, colors, silhouettes, etc.
 

dieworkwear

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Why is everything in this Seinfeld clip what's hot right now? The Bode patchwork shirts, the Scott Fraser Collection knitwear, Beams vacation shirts, the guayaberas, the baggy Our Legacy fits, the thick JMM glasses, the two tone Aime Leon Dore correspondent shoes, etc

 

hoodog

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I think you can still map styles by decade. 2000 fashion was very different from 2010, and 2010 is very different from now. But it's easier to wear clothes that are "out of date" nowadays. People can dress according to very niche tribes online that are totally disassociated from their physical reality. So there are still raw denim communities that dress like it's 2010. And Ivy Style guys who still dress like the reprinting of Take Ivy just dropped.
Raw denim communities from 2010? Who dis? Is this the Americana heritage lumberjack crowd?
 

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