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Questions about "luxury" shirting

thedavidstarr

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This is a somewhat different but related question. I own too many shirts—50 or 60. Varying fits and quality and brands: Proper Cloth, Turnbull & Asser, Eton, Mason/Mr. Fish, New England Shirt and Independent (both via my friend Gary Drinkwater), etc.

But bottom line is 50 is too many just in the obvious sense of wearing something at most a few times a year at most. I’d prefer for the sake of sanity and space to get down to 25-30.

Which connects to this thread—achieving a more uniform approach to quality fit look in effect to simplify one’s wardrobe. This obviously begs the question: how one quantifies the 25/30 re solids fancies etc.

Other people have experience trying to reduce simplify rethink their shirt collection via their choice of cloth and makers?

Thank you
 

gimpwiz

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Bespoke by Divij is what he's going by now. At this point I don't think its really correct to describe it as MTM on the suit/separates side. I have a Harrisons DB 4x1 tux ready for final fitting right now. Had a basted and multiple fittings.

I do think I would describe his shirting as MTM+ whereas Carl's is bespoke.

Divij has excellen outcomes on suitings and sport coats. If you go look at Andy57's dinner jackets in the black tie thread you can see ample evidence of Divij's quality.

That being said I probably own 10+ Divij shirts and now nearing 10 CEGO shirts. Every single CEGO shirt is better than every single Divij shirt.

My apologies, my knowledge was out of date. Looks like they went from MTM-close-to-bespoke to bespoke. Nice!

In what ways are the CEGO shirts better than the Divij shirts? I need some more shirts and I am trying to learn more about what to pay attention to.

This is a somewhat different but related question. I own too many shirts—50 or 60. Varying fits and quality and brands: Proper Cloth, Turnbull & Asser, Eton, Mason/Mr. Fish, New England Shirt and Independent (both via my friend Gary Drinkwater), etc.

But bottom line is 50 is too many just in the obvious sense of wearing something at most a few times a year at most. I’d prefer for the sake of sanity and space to get down to 25-30.

Which connects to this thread—achieving a more uniform approach to quality fit look in effect to simplify one’s wardrobe. This obviously begs the question: how one quantifies the 25/30 re solids fancies etc.

Other people have experience trying to reduce simplify rethink their shirt collection via their choice of cloth and makers?

Thank you

I'm going the exact opposite way, trying to get up to the full set of shirts that I want. I'll be much more on the casual side than most, though. I think my end goal is something along the lines of: two formal shirts, five or six classic dress shirts, a couple linen dress shirts, a couple lightweight oxford cloth shirts, a couple heavyweight (heavier-weight, anyways) oxford cloth shirts, several colored shirts in a similar cut to a classic dress shirt, and a half dozen flannels. So like, ~25 shirts. And yes, I do love the flannels! Super underrated IMO.
 

ValidusLA

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So .. I am not a tailoring professional but this is how I see CEGO quality as being better to Divij or PC.

Partly its the "effort and time to achieve fit." Proper Cloth is basically crap compared to the other two. They won't even do separate arm lengths. Divij is significantly better than PC, but even after 10+ shirts and multiple try ons never got the chest as right as I'd like. Carl did one try one. My first shirt was extremely well fit - we ended up replacing the collar on it and then it and all shirts after have been spot on.

In terms of construction - stitching, seams, etc just seem tighter and of better quality.

Collars are better shaped / Carl does a better job of sizing collars to individual faces than you will get from others.

The rounded edges on cuffs seem more elegant.

The buttons are better (thinner but w/o feeling cheap).

The fabrics / sizing seem better dialed in vis a vis shrinkage on wash.

Add to all that he's actually faster than Divij's HK workshop and I'd rather pay for American labor where I can if the product is as good or better.

Pricing is going to vary by fabric. I've always bought 2-3 shirts at a time and have selected based of fabric preference not price. CEGO isn't cheap, but it shouldn't be.

I regret my 15 or so Proper Cloth shirts. They are certainly cheaper, but now they seem.....subpar.
 

Cliffnopus

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This is a somewhat different but related question. I own too many shirts—50 or 60. Varying fits and quality and brands: Proper Cloth, Turnbull & Asser, Eton, Mason/Mr. Fish, New England Shirt and Independent (both via my friend Gary Drinkwater), etc.

But bottom line is 50 is too many just in the obvious sense of wearing something at most a few times a year at most. I’d prefer for the sake of sanity and space to get down to 25-30.

Which connects to this thread—achieving a more uniform approach to quality fit look in effect to simplify one’s wardrobe. This obviously begs the question: how one quantifies the 25/30 re solids fancies etc.

Other people have experience trying to reduce simplify rethink their shirt collection via their choice of cloth and makers?

Thank you
I have recently had to restock my wardrobe due to massive weight loss. Now that Louis Boston is no more, I have had to seek out new methods. I have been successfully working with Moshers in Newton to replenish. I have had to think long and hard, being retired, I no longer need wasteful multiples. In deciding my actual needs, I now have (Bespoke-ish/MTM) 1 white, 1 French blue, 1 light pink, 1 ecru and 1 blue/yellow check. I will order a Bengal stripe in very lightblue/white. Those dress shirts plus a half dozen casual hidden button downs make up my total number of shirts. I MAY add to this, in the future, but there is no current plan.

When I rounded up my old shirts to donate them, I was surprised that I had several that I had only worn once (and a couple of never worns). Won't allow that anymore.

Best of luck with your paring down. And ps: same with trousers/sport jackets (Oxxford and Coppley).
 

MidwestCPA

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Does anyone know where I can look at the full swatch books for Alumo and DJA online? I've been able to piece them together to a degree from the websites of Apposta (btw, does anyone have any opinions of their work?), Divij, and WW Chan, but wanted to know if anyone knows of a better solution to see what patterns are available for the different weaves and thread counts.
 

JohnMRobie

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Does anyone know where I can look at the full swatch books for Alumo and DJA online? I've been able to piece them together to a degree from the websites of Apposta (btw, does anyone have any opinions of their work?), Divij, and WW Chan, but wanted to know if anyone knows of a better solution to see what patterns are available for the different weaves and thread counts.
DJA should be in Albini’s app. FabricButler
 

JohnMRobie

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This is perfect! Thank you
Re: Alumo their bunches aren’t available anywhere completely online. I do have the 2023 price list that has all of the bunches listed and their composition and yarn counts if that’s helpful so you can at least point your maker in the right direction of which bunch you’d like to see.
 

taxgenius

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Thoughts on Alumo Saronno 120/2?
 

taxgenius

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Ascot chang has pushed their prices up in the last 10 years. $760 is a very nice margin for a shirt made in china. Alumo will not sell to proper cloth.
120's from alumo are better then 120's from many other mills.
I just ordered a length of Riva Popeline Tela for myself. it feels very nice in the swatch book.
Any idea why Alumo wont sell to Proper Cloth?
 

Shirtmaven

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Any idea why Alumo wont sell to Proper Cloth?
It would upset their loyal base of custom shirtmakers.
Most shirt makers charge $300 + for a shirt made usung alumo fabrics.
Proper cloth will then sell a medicore construted shirt for less then $200.
Alumo is then no longer a luxury brand.
I don't follow the product line of proper cloth. I doubt Loro Piana will sell propercloth.

The industry felt the same way when Albini sold Thomas Mason fabric to J. CREW.
The constructions were not the same as what they usually sold. Shirts were made in Mauritious where for some reason shirts could be sent to the USA using higher count fabrics with no additional duty charges.
The J Crew customer thought they were getting a fancy shirt.
It lowered the value of the Thomas Mason brand
 

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