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Porsche Cayman S vs. Boxster S?

speedster.8

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Originally Posted by Andre Yew
Before you decide on a Boxster or most any other open-roof car, check to make sure your local track day organization allows open-roof cars. Many will not unless you have an SCCA-approved roll-cage installed. This is easier to do unobtrusively on some cars than others. A roll-cage also requires 5-point harnesses, which may also require seating changes. For the Boxster or Cayman, you can get almost the same options as the Carreras: sport exhaust, 6-speed, 18- or 19-inch wheels, sport seats, PASM, etc. Also track days will accelerate your maintenance schedule, so make sure you can afford the upkeep for your hobby. Big brake rotors, big rubber tires, etc. are all significantly more expensive than regular stuff. --Andre
Unfortunately, for me this is due to a tax issue as we have 120% tax on cars, so a y2000 996c4 is 65.000$ more expensive than a 2001 boxter 2.7. just to give you an idea, and the 996 goes for 120.000,-$ in god condition with complete european history & service. Yes I know its insane, but thats how it is when you want to use something localy ... But the boxter I would get would be with hatd top and cage, and maintenace and uppgrades is no prob. having had 3x911 and a 356. And beeing a regular trackie, through audi, bmw & porche clubs.
 

Hanseat

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Speedster, where do you live? Denmark is the only country I know of that has such stiff 'fines' for wanting a nice car...
 

whacked

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Originally Posted by imageWIS
Dude: lesson #1 in internet forum surfing: don't join a new forum and start posting that you own Porsches and Ferrari's...because no one is going to believe you (because you actually don't own them).

Jon.


Originally Posted by cam_pearson
Here's a link to see our stangs, I'm currently trying to scan a picture of the Gold 68 and 456, which don't seem to be going very well... Just check out the photo bucket and let me know what you think. My son and I modded, well added the scoop and hood pins on the GT about four months ago, purely for show purposes, came first this year in the 05, and second in the Green '69, just American racing aftermarket rims, deep dish buggers. the cobra jet we've just brought, she's the same color as the '68 fastback (which I'm having trouble loading photos of) but will get them up ASAP, and the TR is , non NZ new, the guy who owned it before us (cobra) put an aftermarket air cleaner and edelbrock valve covers, changing those ASAP!

Cam -

link : http://s223.photobucket.com/albums/d...es_bond_album/
just for anyone who wants a look click there, adding more photos shortly, had to get the son around to help me put the italian and new cobra jet up!

Im also a member of the Bay of Plenty Mustang owners club and registered with the Ferrari owners club of New Zealand.


rotflmao.gif


Not that I didn't see it coming.
 

briancl

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Originally Posted by spertia
For those talking about taking one's car onto a track -- how does this actually work? Are there "public" tracks where you can pay to let loose with your personal vehicle, or are you actually racing, or what? I'm just curious, as I obviously know nothing about this.

Andre explained it already, but some other important details:

You are always classed with similarly skilled drivers and similar performing cars (you likely won't be up against Z06 'vette's in your Mazda3., and you won't be with highly skilled and experienced drivers if you are relatively new to the sport). This is important because it minimizes passing and increases safety.

Passing is usually highly regulated at the lower skilled class levels. You typically can only pass in designated areas (straights) and only after the pass has been initiated by the lead car (you point the trailing vehicle by and lift for a brief second to give the passing car a bit of an advantage to complete the pass quickly). Once you move up to higher skilled classes, passing rules are usually loosened, but still important and enforced when necessary.

Any well run event will include very large margins of safety wherever possible. This includes plentiful instructors, attentive corner workers who know how to use flags, and a strict corner captain running his crew. Classroom instruction is usually offered for the novices to go over the basics, and parade laps (low speed) are usually done to start the day off.

Events vary on how fast and experienced the participants are. You may think the Porsche club might have the fastest and most dedicated members around, but there will still be a full class of novices who drive around at regular street speeds. Some people just like the idea of track driving and the thrill have having no speed limits... they don't actually exercise their rights, but they still have fun.

Also, if you like cars, there is nothing better than spending a nice Saturday in the summer around a bunch of exotic and exciting cars with 60 other gearheads. Everyone is always very nice and accommodating as well as incredibly helpful to lesser experienced participants. It is not uncommon to get offered rides or instruction.

Oh, and it's very addictive (and a bit expensive)
smile.gif
 

speedster.8

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Originally Posted by Hanseat
Speedster, where do you live? Denmark is the only country I know of that has such stiff 'fines' for wanting a nice car...
Same same but slightly different acent
wink.gif
Just to the north ... Denmark, finland, Portugal and N.... all have high tax on cars. Unlike the swedish, german etc we dont have anny "brands" that could be penalty taxed on the other markets. So the government alougs them selves a "bonus".
 

Mr. Checks

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Originally Posted by spertia
For those talking about taking one's car onto a track -- how does this actually work? Are there "public" tracks where you can pay to let loose with your personal vehicle, or are you actually racing, or what? I'm just curious, as I obviously know nothing about this.

Some clubs also rent former aircraft runways (or big parking lots) and set up a "track" with cones. No mods needed for the car, just a safety check, helmet, and removing loose things from the interior of the car.
 

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