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Ayrton

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I would say after a little polishing, and perhaps some burnishing, you will never notice. YMMV
 

actionjbone

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I disagree. I’ve used them for years and they smooth out the creases in the shell cordovan as well as removing scratches and smoothing out nicks as well.

You can’t go from this….
View attachment 2080641

To this…

View attachment 2080643

With just a brush/cloth.
Yeah - whether you use a bone, a spoon, a smooth dowel, or some other kind of object, you need *something* in order to apply pressure.

The pressure seems to do three things: (1) force the lubricant/cream/polish deeper into the dense shell, (2) smooth the microtears that cause the dry-looking lighter patches in deep creases, and (3) flatten the waves back down.

Different people will swear by a bone or a spoon. Either way, the pressure does seem to help old shell.
 

Johnniegold

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Yeah - whether you use a bone, a spoon, a smooth dowel, or some other kind of object, you need *something* in order to apply pressure.

The pressure seems to do three things: (1) force the lubricant/cream/polish deeper into the dense shell, (2) smooth the microtears that cause the dry-looking lighter patches in deep creases, and (3) flatten the waves back down.

Different people will swear by a bone or a spoon. Either way, the pressure does seem to help old shell.

In addition to the deer bone and the sleeking bone, I’ve added this tool to my kit. This is the Ebony Stick. Its size and shape make it ergonomically easier to handle than the deer bone and sleeking bone. Due to its shape, it acts as both a deer bone and a sleeking bone with its narrower end allowing you to work easily between outsole and the upper, while its wider end as well as length-wise works very well on the vamp, toe cap and heel areas.

I am pleased with it.

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JFWR

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Yeah - whether you use a bone, a spoon, a smooth dowel, or some other kind of object, you need *something* in order to apply pressure.

The pressure seems to do three things: (1) force the lubricant/cream/polish deeper into the dense shell, (2) smooth the microtears that cause the dry-looking lighter patches in deep creases, and (3) flatten the waves back down.

Different people will swear by a bone or a spoon. Either way, the pressure does seem to help old shell.

None of these reasons makes sense, I'd say.

Mechanical pressures are unlikely to push oil deeper into the substance substantially. The penetration comes from staining through the inside of the material. I highly doubt that any amount of pressure that isn't compressing the leather itself in a significant way - like putting it in a vice - would actually squeeze the oil deeper in.

2. The dry looking lighter patches are cured not by smoothing, but by rehydration with Neetsfoot oil or equivalent.

3. The rolls don't get flattened, they emerge immediately again upon being worn.

I doubt you're hurting your shoes with this technique, but I don't believe there is any reasonable evidence that this does anything positive for your shoes at all.
 

JFWR

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Anyone have recommendations for a cobbler in New York which could sew an eyelet tear (slight) on a pair of cordovan LWB and install grommets on the eyelets to arrest this problem moving forward?
 

JFWR

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I had a good experience with B. Nelson in Manhattan. They removed the pull strap for me on a pair Alden dress boots. Great work and done quickly.

It seems more or less I'd be obliged to use them, as it appears they are last cobbler capable of working on good shoes in New York.

Thank you! I will actually just bite the bullet and go to B. Nelson now.
 

Johnniegold

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Anyone have recommendations for a cobbler in New York which could sew an eyelet tear (slight) on a pair of cordovan LWB and install grommets on the eyelets to arrest this problem moving forward?


I had a good experience with B. Nelson in Manhattan. They removed the pull strap for me on a pair Alden dress boots. Great work and done quickly.

+1
 

actionjbone

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Any cobbler recommendations for D.C.?
You're in luck! The DC area has two of the best cobblers in the world.

Bedo's in Falls Church, or Sunny in Ellicott City.

I've also used Nick's in Rockville. Alan (Nick's son) does good work, but has a smaller "parts" selection than Bedo's and Sunny.

 

nevaeh

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You're in luck! The DC area has two of the best cobblers in the world.

Bedo's in Falls Church, or Sunny in Ellicott City.

I've also used Nick's in Rockville. Alan (Nick's son) does good work, but has a smaller "parts" selection than Bedo's and Sunny.

I’ve seen both their videos. Never realized they’re in the D.C. area! Thanks!
 

angloxyz

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Hello, my Alden's suede appears to have become "hairy". What is the best way of dealing with this?
 

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Fenners81

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None of these reasons makes sense, I'd say.

Mechanical pressures are unlikely to push oil deeper into the substance substantially. The penetration comes from staining through the inside of the material. I highly doubt that any amount of pressure that isn't compressing the leather itself in a significant way - like putting it in a vice - would actually squeeze the oil deeper in.

2. The dry looking lighter patches are cured not by smoothing, but by rehydration with Neetsfoot oil or equivalent.

3. The rolls don't get flattened, they emerge immediately again upon being worn.

I doubt you're hurting your shoes with this technique, but I don't believe there is any reasonable evidence that this does anything positive for your shoes at all.
I came to this thread looking for boning advice so pleased to see it's recently been discussed. I take it from your comment that you're not a boner? I only have one pair of shell shoes that I bought recently and obviously want to care for them as well as possible. I'm guessing people are pretty split on the necessity for it. It also seems that some prefer spooning over boning... any advice on this would be appreciated. As it stands I've just applied cordovan cream once and then brushed them off.
 

actionjbone

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I came to this thread looking for boning advice so pleased to see it's recently been discussed. I take it from your comment that you're not a boner? I only have one pair of shell shoes that I bought recently and obviously want to care for them as well as possible. I'm guessing people are pretty split on the necessity for it. It also seems that some prefer spooning over boning... any advice on this would be appreciated. As it stands I've just applied cordovan cream once and then brushed them off.
Brushing, conditioning, and cedar shoe trees are the only requirements for shell.

Everything else is a matter of personal preference, based on how you like to work on shoes and whether you want to temporarily smooth them out.

Several of us here have strong opinions based on our personal preferences - but that's all they are, preferences.

Try out a few different things. See what you like most. And enjoy your shoes, that's all that matters.
 

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