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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Munky

    Munky Distinguished Member

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    Sorry, but I wouldn't recommend applying heat to shoes. Full stop. Nor would I use 'lots of pressure...so that the wax melts right in'. I don't know exactly what has happened to these shoes but I am pretty sure that heat and pressure won't be the best things to use to sort them out. And don't rush towards the Renomat. Best wishes, Munky.
     


  2. suitforcourt

    suitforcourt Senior Member

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    To go a little off topic... what about using heat to remove creases? Like in the video?

     


  3. Luigi_M

    Luigi_M Senior Member

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    @Munky , I think that pressure is adviced when polishing pebble grain shoes, as one needs to reach the "gouges" (I can't find a better word now ...) between pebbles to create an uniform coat that afterwards can be shined. As for "heat", I think that it's the one produced by thorough rubbing - not applied with a torch as in the youtube you posted some time ago ...
    I don't know if I'm translating correctly the opinion of Mr. masernaut. Maybe I understood completely wrong ...
    All best wishes, Luigi.
     


  4. Luigi_M

    Luigi_M Senior Member

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    @suitforcourt , interesting video, but I wouldn't try that method myself.
    And, it seems, the shoes J.Fitzpatrick used as a testbed were already quite screwed before he began. I'm not sure he would have tried on a pair of bang new Edward Green!
    I too sometimes use some old, no more worn pairs, to experiment in corpore vili.
    Greetings, Luigi.
     


  5. LLEE

    LLEE Member

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    @suitforcourt Re: Heat on shoes. *My experience is limited, so take it for what its worth*.
    I have had really good results with a heat gun, conditioner, a spoon and my hands to get 'set in' wrinkles out. Obviously, some wrinkling is totally normal and will never disappear forever. However, on pairs that have either not seen a tree in their life, worn by someone with too small of a foot, or look like they haven't been moisturised in a long long time, I've actually been quite happy with the results. Some seem to claim the results are only temporary, or only with the trees in, but my experience has been different. While the wrinkles often don't entirely stay away, the heavy creasing of the leather which makes the shoe look neglected, as well as the curl (due to the pulling of the creases), is mitigated quite well. The following is what I've done, and has worked for me, in my own limited experience. YMMV.
    After a thorough cleaning, with trees in place, and a few days of moisturising, time to break out the heat gun. Be mindful, you want to always have the gun moving, and an adequate distance away from the leather. It will warm quickly, the goal should be the warm the entire thickness of the leather uniformly for the area you are working. If you get to close or too hot, you run the risk of scalding the surface without much positive effect. Some conditioner on the back of a spoon to lubricate, press firmly with the spoon against either a well fitting tree or your hand inside the shoe, and work in a manner which suits the proper shape of the shoe and the direction of the creases you are trying to get out. While doing this, the leather should be uncomfortably warm to the touch, but not hot enough to give you a burn (that would be bad). You will actually see the small creases being worked out as you work them. Immediately replace shoe tree if removed, apply a little more conditioner and let rest for a day.
    Obviously, this advice is not congruent with other knowledgeable, respectable members here. So, try at your own risk, maybe not on a new pair of EG's lol. I'll see if I can get some photos of the pairs I've done this to, and have worn at least several times since, just so there's some reference.
    Cheers!
     


  6. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior Member

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    I have seen that video of Justin with a heat gun and the results are indeed impressive. If I had a heat gun I would give this a try, but only on some tired old Barkers that I'm not too bothered about. I would be concerned about the long term effects of this treatment on the leather.
     


  7. masernaut

    masernaut Senior Member

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    Yes, you're right, Luigi_M. By heat, I mean the heat coming from vigorously rubbing/waxing polish into the leather.
     


  8. Munky

    Munky Distinguished Member

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    Call me unimaginative, if you will, but I would never used a heat gun on shoes - even as a last resort. Sincerely yours, Munky.
     


  9. suitforcourt

    suitforcourt Senior Member

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    I have never tried it, and likely never will. Too many possible horror stories can emerge with a heat gun on leather.
     


  10. clee1982

    clee1982 Distinguished Member

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    When I was in the military definitely used hair dryer (some used lighter as well), can definitely f’ed it up, but back then it was issued shoes and boots and they were crap leather couldn’t careless unless I do actually f’ed it up...
     


  11. Luigi_M

    Luigi_M Senior Member

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    I think that all the heat a beloved shoe needs should come from its owner's hands.
    Just rub them.
    ...
    All in all, I'd never use a heat gun to warm a lady ... :D
    Yours (better with words than with facts), Luigi.
     


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