1. In 2018. by way of thanks for being a part of this community, we'll be choosing 16 active members of our community at random to receive a special gift and a gift certificate for one of our affiliate vendors, to represent each of our 16 years.

    Fok and the Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Churchill W

    Churchill W Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    2,536
    Likes Received:
    591
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2013
    Location:
    New York City
    I've seen rubber suede brushes before that are pretty inexpensive as well plastic bristled ones, but can understand why the brass ones might be too aggressive. The Saphir one I have seems aggressive as you mention.
     


  2. benhour

    benhour Senior Member

    Messages:
    682
    Likes Received:
    259
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2012
    Location:
    Athens
    I would recommend using a bristle horse hair brush or preferably using a short haired horse hair applicator brush!! it is way better for removing dust and dirt i and doesnt damage the leather!!

    Generally the brass bristle brushes are designed to raise (or create ) a nap and they are not intended for everyday use ,they must used very sparingly (once /twice a year) and with as less pressure as possible!

    i hope i helped a little bit!! (i ll post a photo of my brush when i ll be back home)
     


  3. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior Member

    Messages:
    399
    Likes Received:
    167
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Location:
    Newcastle, UK
    I happened to spot a "natural bristle" kiwi brush in the Supermarket just now and thought I would give it a try.

    It feels slightly more stiff than my horse hair brushes. Could it be pig/boar? I'm not sure what else it could be? (Sorry for tiny pic)

    brush.jpeg
     


  4. suitforcourt

    suitforcourt Senior Member

    Messages:
    887
    Likes Received:
    564
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2012
    Location:
    Greater Toronto Area
    I don't currently own any suede shoes. But when I did, I simply used this one:

    https://www.amazon.ca/Moneysworth-Best-Deluxe-Suede-Brush/dp/B0091NYS5U

    Got the job done, and very reasonably priced.
     


  5. Munky

    Munky Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    520
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    Hi, English. I would certainly consider paying out for a better brush than this. Look on Amazon for horsehair brushes. They are more expensive but very much better than generic 'shoe brushes'. For me, these (below) are the best of all. They are very large, quite expensive but ideal for both brushing before you go out and buffing up after you have used polish. I keep a pair for each colour of my shoes. I think the initial outlay is worthwhile in the long run. If you feel that this is overkill, just keep one of these brushes to use, for all colours, before you go out.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Woly-Colle...6390824&sr=8-92&keywords=horsehair+shoe+brush

    Just a caveat. I only use these on my calf leather shoes. Tricker's, Loake's and so on. I don't use them on my heavily corrected grain Doc Marten's. I use Renapur on those. I put it on with my finger and it doesn't need any further buffing. With my new, blue, Carlos Santos shoes, I use the neutral polish that they gave me with the shoes and then use a cloth just to buff them up a bit. Horses for courses, perhaps, but horse hair works out best in the end. :)


    Very best wishes, Munky.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018 at 11:55 AM


  6. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Senior Member

    Messages:
    399
    Likes Received:
    167
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Location:
    Newcastle, UK
    Hi Munky - That does indeed look like a nice horse hair brush. A bit more plush than the old Barker branded one I have been using most of the time on my calf leathers. I might invest!

    For suede though, I heard you should get a stiffer brush to get to the dirt within the pile of the suede surface. I have a stiff nylon suede brush similar to one a couple of posts above but even that seems a bit harsh and leaves lines down the pile.

    I'll see how this new brush performs. It's for a summer G&G loafer that doesn't get much dirt/mud on them to be honest. I just need to keep dust off.
     


  7. kevenmee

    kevenmee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    36
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Bumping, any thoughts?
     


  8. stephenaf2003

    stephenaf2003 Senior Member

    Messages:
    507
    Likes Received:
    695
    Joined:
    May 16, 2015
    Location:
    Northern VA
    I recently got a lesson from Scott McKee, one the bespoke makers for Trickers, about using a very fine grain sand paper to clean suede. His technique was to ensure to only go in small circles, and not be overly aggressive. Worked magically, and I use it for all my suede now.
     


  9. TonyJoe

    TonyJoe Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    105
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2017
    Location:
    Lincoln, NE
    What have you tried so far? Renomat would be a ways down the list of things to try in my opinion.
     


  10. Munky

    Munky Distinguished Member

    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    520
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    Hi English. Sorry I missed your particular reference to suede brushes. When I had suede shoes, I just used one of those two-sided ones. One side appeared to be made of thing brass wire and the other side was made of a 'rubber brush'. It seemed to work well but I am no expert. Best wishes, M.
     


  11. chrfi

    chrfi Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    47
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2016
    I also have suede brushes for when I really clean the shoes for a respray of Saphir Invulner. I brush my suede shoes after every use with a regular horse hair brush and that seems to be enough - it cleans the shoe of dust and dirt, and also keeps the edges clean.
     


  12. helloiamalvin

    helloiamalvin Member

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Yesterday
    Hi guys,

    I posted this question in an Edward Green thread and was directed here.

    I recently purchased a pair of Edward Green unlined slippers as can be seen as follows.

    [​IMG]

    I have two questions that I really need help with:

    I sprayed some suede protection on it, the brand being Liquiproof. However, the suede became darker and less "lively". Before I applied the spray, the suede was more "alive" and 3-dimensional. Now, the colour looks very solid.

    This is how they looked when I first got them. They just look different, with a nicer colour to them.

    [​IMG]

    I have already tried brushing them a bit with all 3 sides of a suede brush (the rubber side, hard bristles, etc.). Although the suede had livened up just slightly, the colour remains rather dark. I do not dare to brush them excessively as I am aware that it may cause further damage.

    I wonder if this darkened effect from the Liquiproof protection spray is permanent?

    I have received advice to simply wear it and brush them on a regularly basis or to wash them with a suede cleaner.

    I also note that I should not have sprayed them in the first place.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by