1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

The Architecture Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Connemara, Jan 31, 2009.

  1. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

    Messages:
    6,774
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    I really hope that all of that glass is double-glazed, because otherwise it will be absolutely freezing in there in winter - especially since it's apparently a ski cabin.
     
  2. Big Bird

    Big Bird Senior member

    Messages:
    122
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Location:
    Stockholm
    

    Well, since the cabin is located in Norway I am pretty sure that it is triple glass insulated windows. Heat loss through the window will therefore not be a major problem.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

    Messages:
    3,054
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    Location:
    Boston->NYC->Helsinki->St.-Petersburg->Budapest->A
    

    From living in Scandinavia and Finland for quite some time I would guess radiant floor heating all around via ground heat pump, triple glass windows and proper insulation. I can bet money there is a nice Sauna somewhere in that building.
    The views must be lovely from that place.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
  4. texas_jack

    texas_jack Senior member

    Messages:
    10,231
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Location:
    Hobart, IN
    falling into that outdoor stair well at night, on the other hand, probably will be.
     
  5. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

    Messages:
    9,601
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    The Old North State
    It was a joke from the home ownership thread.
     
    2 people like this.
  6. Big Bird

    Big Bird Senior member

    Messages:
    122
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Location:
    Stockholm
    

    Sorry I took the bait. Cross threads jokes are too advanced for me.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. ethanm

    ethanm Senior member

    Messages:
    10,614
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2011
    Location:
    أرض العزم
    The random windows on the side ruin it for me.
     
  8. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    15,841
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Location:
    People's Republic of San Francisco

    Word.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

    Messages:
    50,225
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
  10. ethanm

    ethanm Senior member

    Messages:
    10,614
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2011
    Location:
    أرض العزم
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
    1 person likes this.
  11. Mujib

    Mujib Senior member

    Messages:
    431
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2006
    Hotel Okura in Tokyo:

     
    1 person likes this.
  12. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

    Messages:
    14,187
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Alain Carle Architecte
    House
    Quebec
    2017


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
    3 people like this.
  13. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

    Messages:
    14,187
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Dom Hans Van Der Laan
    Saint Benedict Abbey
    Maastricht, Netherlands
    1968


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
    2 people like this.
  14. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    15,841
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Location:
    People's Republic of San Francisco
    Can a monk get a kneepad?
     
  15. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

    Messages:
    14,187
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    GUNKANJIMA (2008-2012)
    Photos by Yves Marchard and Romain Meffre

    In the South China Sea, 15 kilometers off the southwest coast of Nagasaki among the thousands of verdant landmasses that surround Japan, lies a mysterious island. With the geometric silhouette of a dark gray hull, perforated by hundreds of small windows, the island resembles a battleship. As one moves closer, approaching by sea, the figure takes shape again and the ghost ship turns into a block of concrete surrounded by a high wall on which waves crash - the island looks like a Japanese version of Alcatraz. Only 40 years ago, this tiny island was home to one of the most remarkable mining towns in the world and maintained the highest population density in the world.

    During the wave of industrialisation in the nineteenth century, a coal seam was discovered on the tiny Hashima island. In 1890 the Mitsubishi Corporation opened a mine on the island. For decades coal production sustained Japan's modernisation and helped establish its position as an industrialised nation and imperial power. Workers settled on the island and the population increased. Mine slag was used to expand the surface of the colony; piling up on itself like an ant hill. The small mining town quickly became an autonomous modern settlement (with apartment buildings, a school, hospital, shrine, retail stores and restaurants) which mimicked the other settlements on the Nippon archipelago. One multi-storied concrete apartment block with its brutal and rational style followed another, until the tiny island became the most densely populated place in the world per square metre with over 5,000 inhabitants in the 1950s.
    Long before social housing or Soviet factory cities, life within the community was dedicated to a collectivist ideology, a dedication to production and to the Mitsubishi family.
    The concrete wall separating land and water was erected to protect the colony from sea assault and gave the island the appearance of a battleship riding the waves. It's silhouette earned the island the nickname; Gunkanjima or Battleship Island.

    Gunkanjima's fortunes began to decline in the late 1960s, when the rest of Japan's economy soared and petroleum replaced coal as the pillar of national energy needs. The mine closed in January 1974. Six months later, transportation to the island ceased and the last inhabitants were forced to leave. Since then, the island has become an abandoned ghost town.

    Gunkanjima thus seems to be the ultimate expression of the relation between architecture, culture of labor and the principle of industrial modernity, which aims not only at innovation and growth, but also at the abandonment of any obsolete form of activity.

    This project was conceived during two trips to Gunkanjima in 2008 and 2012. The historical pictures displayed in this series were taken by photographer Chiyuki Ito, who lived on the island, and are part of Dotoku Sakamoto's collection.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2017
    6 people like this.
  16. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

    Messages:
    14,187
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    WMR Arquitectos
    Till House
    El Arco, Chile
    2014


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    5 people like this.
  17. FlyingMonkey

    FlyingMonkey Senior member

    Messages:
    3,580
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Location:
    Ontario
    The destruction of the Okura is a disgrace. But the destruction of iconic buildings is by no means unusual in Tokyo, and ironically, the constant churn of destruction and building is one of hte things that makes the city so interesting. Up to point though...
     
  18. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    15,841
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Location:
    People's Republic of San Francisco
    Highgate House
    London
    Carmody Groarke
    2016

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    3 people like this.

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by