Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope)

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by LA Guy, May 15, 2015.

  1. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

    Messages:
    8,011
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    This might be a dumb question, but why don't more stores do lookbooks?

    These two shots from Mr. Porter are like night and day. They're both showing an Oliver Spencer jacket, but the styling and photography of the "lookbook" (actually just a photo to accompany a feature on William Gilchrist) is so much better than the product shot.

    Assuming you know someone photogenic, and can hire a photographer for like $500, wouldn't it be pretty low cost for a store to put together a lookbook every season? You could do the color correction yourself (maybe not something super professional, but it's not that hard to learn)

    This feels so much better than a product shot.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     


  2. habitant

    habitant Senior member

    Messages:
    2,100
    Likes Received:
    788
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    The product shot is how shitty it will look on everyone. Look books are false hope.
     


  3. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

    Messages:
    8,011
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Same with this Kingsman suit (Kingsman now seems to be just a Mr Porter house line)


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     


  4. Nik Telford

    Nik Telford Senior member

    Messages:
    1,433
    Likes Received:
    368
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2014
    

    I actually loved the first half of season 2.I really loved hearing about the cultural origins of traditional southern dishes.
     


  5. Parker

    Parker Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    7,766
    Likes Received:
    12,771
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Location:
    Yerba Buena
    Because a good photographer shooting a whole lookbook would be WAY more expensive than that. ++ models, assistants, hair/make-up, location fee, design, retouching, etc. all add up.

    I love look books -- they embody the romance and ideals of fashion -- along with runway shows and editorials. But for my own clothes buying I've learned to accept habitant's idea: if it looks good on some short model with average build on some half-baked e-commerce page, there's a pretty good chance it will look good on me.

    I think it's a good investment for brands though, because as we know the image has a lot of power to persuade. A good look book or campaign or whatever can cement your impression.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015


  6. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

    Messages:
    8,011
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    

    I assume if you're a big store, you have to pay the big bucks. But for a small operation, can't you get a lot of that stuff for relatively cheap?

    Back in the '90s, I organized some fashion shoots for a few streetwear companies. The models and make-up artists were basically free and the only person who really got paid was the photographer (partly because of film developing costs). Obviously, as a freelancer, I like to see people get paid for their work -- but if a store wanted to, it seems like a relatively easy thing to pull together. Esp now that everything is digital.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015


  7. t3hg0suazn

    t3hg0suazn Senior member

    Messages:
    1,949
    Likes Received:
    1,692
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2011
    TIL that Kingsman is an actual brand, and not just a made up front for a secret British spy organization in a movie.
     


  8. basil rathbone

    basil rathbone Senior member

    Messages:
    637
    Likes Received:
    2,037
    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2012
    All advertising is false hope.
     


  9. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

    Messages:
    8,011
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    

    They actually named the movie Kingsman so they could have a brand. The original title of the film was The Secret Service, but then they realized that would make for a weird clothing label name, so they changed it to The Kingsman.

    Was originally just supposed to be a one-season thing, to tie in with the film, but it's since morphed into Mr. Porter's house line.
     


  10. nicelynice

    nicelynice Senior member

    Messages:
    6,537
    Likes Received:
    24,408
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2009
    Small shops that do a lot of business on the web in Japan and especially Korea do this all the time with their garbage H&M-quality clothes. Not necessarily a look-book, but they'll take pictures of their clothes outside, giving them context. I don't know why more US stores don't do this. Just try clicking on a random product on Gmarket (http://gcategory.gmarket.co.kr/Listview/Category?GdlcCd=100000003), everything has a ton of product shots. I don't know if it's because "creatives" actually get paid more in the states, but in Japan and Korea everything from photography to styling to doing the web stuff would be a minimum wage job.

    Also Fascinate's blog: https://www.fascinate.jp/english/blog
    Like, these guys just go outside with a decent camera, I doubt they're planned or touched up much, and it looks leagues better than any product shots.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015


  11. dmash

    dmash Senior member

    Messages:
    4,372
    Likes Received:
    275
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Location:
    Germany
    


    I don't think it's a dumb question at all. Yes, if you have seen and felt a piece that you're set on, a look book won't make a difference. However, antsy buyers (usually with an urge to burn a hole in their wallet) are shmoozed all the time into buying stuff just because the pictures look good.

    I definitely agree it's as stated above, you're talking a much greater sum than $500. Day rate of a decently experienced male catalog model is going to run you like $1-$3k alone.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015


  12. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

    Messages:
    8,011
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    

    You don't need to get an experienced catalog model. You just get friends, or maybe models who are looking to build their portfolios. Or you get a cross promotion going with someone -- like a musician, artist, writer, blogger, editor, or whatever. There are lots of ways you can get free models. They're not going to be the same person who models for J. Crew's catalog, but you don't have to choose between doing something like what Mr. Porter puts out and doing nothing at all.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015


  13. gettoasty

    gettoasty Senior member

    Messages:
    12,489
    Likes Received:
    6,645
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Location:
    Home
    That'll make for an interesting blog idea. Pitch to stores that you'll model for free to give their clothes some more context and in return you can generate some traffic and maybe make some change off sponsors / ads.

    I think the only criteria or a basis to build the website is choosing interesting locations and above average photo and editing skills.

    Words can be kept at a minimum. It will be just pages and pages of new season gear modeled in the wild.
     


  14. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

    Messages:
    8,011
    Likes Received:
    12,982
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    

    That's basically what Instagram has turned into -- covert ads for brands and stores. Basically lookbooks/ paid advertisements trying to pass as selfies

    http://www.harpersbazaar.com/fashion/trends/a10949/how-bloggers-make-money-on-instagram/
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015


  15. dmash

    dmash Senior member

    Messages:
    4,372
    Likes Received:
    275
    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Location:
    Germany
    


    Yeah, completely right, overshot my estimates.

    Hell, now that I think about it I've modeled numerous times for a few different boutiques in exchange for clothing as payment. I thought it was a fantastic deal (as long as one meshes with the style of said boutique).
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by