**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. The Deacon

    The Deacon Senior member

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    THANK YOU, :slayer:
    Does this work with shells?
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2011


  2. b1os

    b1os Senior member

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    Just to make sure, would you directly polish the whole toe or firstly iust a small area around the damage (to level out the hole)?
     


  3. Gdot

    Gdot Senior member

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    treat the whole shoe the same.

    perhaps with an extra layer of polish or two right around the damaged area.
     


  4. Gdot

    Gdot Senior member

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    No idea - but I'm thinking that adding a mirror finish to shell isn't all that possible, or even desirable.
     


  5. patrick_b

    patrick_b Senior member

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    As far as I know, the 8" brush (they may measure 8.25" - 8.5") is the biggest that's easily available. I have an 8" horsehair brush that I bought at a Florsheim store in the late 80's/early 90's, when I was in college and started working. I wish I bought several as it was dirt cheap (like $5) and it's my favorite brush now. The wooden handle is worn smooth and for whatever reason, it just works so much better than my newer, smaller horsehair brushes. I Just found two 8" vintage florsheim horsehair brushes at ebay that look just like the one I have but I can't be sure. They were $10 shipped for the pair so I took a shot. I keep meaning to check a shoe shine stand to see what size they use.

    Online stores like shoetreemarketplace have been around a while and carry an 8" brush. I'd imagine they would work pretty well. I bought a couple 6" brushes at the AE outlet some yrs ago. They do the trick and were relatively inexpensive. Given a choice, I'll use the 8" version. I use it for brown shoes and the smaller one for black, and yet another 6" for Obenauf LP on work boots.


    http://shoeshinekit.com/larshinbrus.html
    http://www.shoetreemarketplace.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=577002
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2011


  6. cbfn

    cbfn Senior member

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    Thanks, Patrick, I'll absolutely look into those. :)
     


  7. 3ff3z8e

    3ff3z8e Well-Known Member

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    post removed. Posted in a more relevant thread. Apologies for the mispost
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2011


  8. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Hi Gdot, I'm always open to ideas. I might give this a try. I think a better description for mirror-shine would be candy shell coating (think mirrored M&M's). It has depth, rather than just being highly polished. I'm also considering a dab of navy blue every now and again, which apparently brings out the depth in black shoes.
     


  9. black_umbrella

    black_umbrella Senior member

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    Been using navy blue cream on a pair of black wingtips for about 3 or four months now. Every couple of polishes. You do get a bit of a blue tint to the shoe, but I think it looks great. Highly recommended.
     


  10. Lear

    Lear Senior member

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    Thanks. Sounds interesting
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2011


  11. Gdot

    Gdot Senior member

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    Lear,

    I'm Absolutely with you on the 'candy coating' description. That puts into words exactly the look I like. It's that extra 'depth' within the finish that brings the effect out.

    I had accomplished it previously before I started to work on this recent pair. But this time I just could NOT seem to get there. And this was after lots effort. I finally went to You Tube to look for more suggestions and that is where I found the hot water suggestion. This suggestion made me remember how much you had already discussed the power of a little heat in creating the correct effect. So that was it for me - I may be too stupid to listen to something when I'm told it only once - but even a dunce like me can't ignore the same information coming from two different sources saying the same thing. :D

    The hot water technique was IMMEDIATELY more effective for me.

    -G
     


  12. BostonHedonist

    BostonHedonist Senior member

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    I hope these aren't too fashion forward to be asking about here, but I have a new pair of Ted Baker cap toes with a rather unique upper that I just don't know the proper steps to care for. I snagged them for a pittance on ye olde online deals site, but I don't really have many details as to their construction. They fit well, the leather is quite soft and they're welted pretty solid... for a TB shoe. I believe the upper is black intentionally "faded" to a slate blue-gray.

    So what steps would you recommend to keep them looking great over time? I imagine a standard colored polish/cream is out of the question...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    As a separate and more specific question, I am wondering how to take care of the leather outsoles. The underside of the outsole has a rubber component that I've managed to scuff the leather sides of the outsoles with. How might you recommend removing the scuffs and maintaining the luster around the welt and heel?

    [​IMG]
     


  13. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    For the uppers I would just use some renovateur and buff. If you want the edges to remain shiny you could try some neutral polish.
     


  14. swiego

    swiego Senior member

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    Lately I've discovered the benefits of stripping existing wax and starting over. It's amazing how well protected the original leather is on shoes that are 10+ years old, with 10 years of cheap wax, and how I can find the grain still there underneath it all :)

    Stripping wax from the older shoes takes some serious elbow grease. I am using isopropyl alcohol. I was wondering if there is a faster way - something stronger, if I am willing to take the risk on older shoes?
     


  15. hendrix

    hendrix Ill-proportioned

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    you could try xylene.
     


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