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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Gerry Nelson

    Gerry Nelson Senior member

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    Thanks, glenjay, for that very comprehensive reply. There's a lot of material about shining but these details aren't really covered. I'm looking forward to hearing what experiences others have.

    I am actually trying to polish a flat quarter-brogue cap toe so your words are encouraging.
     
  2. ddgdl

    ddgdl Well-Known Member

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    Any tips on caring for Allen Edmonds' blue leather Neumoks? It is not part of the rough collection, but the texture also does not feel particularly amenable to my ordinary routine of Reno followed by cream. Anyone have any advice?
     
  3. TheSizzle

    TheSizzle Senior member

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    Leather lotion should be appropriate for most of the cleaning/care you will perform on that shoe.
     
  4. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    I just wanted to say that I really enjoy your "microscopic" approach to shoe care. You have a very thorough understanding of what is happening to shoe leather that can't be seen by the naked eye.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  5. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    two questions
    1. glenjay do you simply heat the carnuba and blend it with wax polish or is it more involved than that id like to make some of my own if you would rather keep it private no prob i understand
    2. I have read in a number of posts that during recrafting the insoles cannot be replaced if this is indeed the case can anyone explain why not
     
  6. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    Regarding #2: You may benefit from watching some shoe making videos if this isn't understood.

    Here are some good ones:

    Allen Edmonds


    Barker


    Crockett & Jones


    Cheaney


    Edward Green


    How To Make Shoes - Gentleman's Gazette
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZzisSt-wlI

    Essentially, the insole is the foundation of the shoe from which everything else is built and attached. The insole is temporarily attached to the bottom of the last with tacks... the gemming rib (goodyear-welted shoes) or hold-fast (hand-welted shoes) is attached to the bottom of the insole (or carved from the bottom of the insole on hand-welted shoes)... the shoe upper is wrapped around the last and tacked to the gemming rib or hold-fast... the welt is stitched through the upper to the gemming rib or hold-fast... the sole is stitched to the welt. If you rip out the insole, the rest of the shoe will start to fall apart.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  7. Winston S.

    Winston S. Senior member

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    So during a recraft the insole is not taken apart from the welt and upper?
     
  8. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    No. This may be theoretically possible if carefully done with a hand-made shoe by a bespoke shoemaker. However, what that would essentially amount to is completely remaking the shoe using the same leather upper. Consider it for a second... Since the entire shoe construction process is begun with the insole, you would have to remove every component of the shoe piece by piece in order to get the insole separated.

    EDIT: I would just add that even though this is theoretically possible for a bespoke shoe maker to do, I've never heard of it being done. They would certainly charge you for a new pair of shoes since they would be essentially starting from scratch on building it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  9. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    Thank you very much, that means a lot to me coming from someone with your depth of knowledge.
     
  10. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    My knowledge of all things shoe care as they relate to this thread are quite elementary compared to yours. Shoe construction and the mechanics of it are my passion, and my knowledge starts to drop off after that.
     
  11. glenjay

    glenjay Senior member

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    For #2 MoneyWellSpent can, and has, given you a better answer than I could.

    As far as the high carnauba blend: It is part of my all natural, non-toxic, shoe polish line. I refer to it as a High Shine paste. Because of the ingredients, when I use the high ratio of carnauba wax in the mixture it makes the paste very hard (almost like dried out paste polish). This allows me to easily control the amount of polish I put on the applicator (cotton cloth or cotton round), and the harder paste comes to a shine faster than a normal paste polish.
     
  12. Winston S.

    Winston S. Senior member

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    Thanks for clearing that up.
     
  13. kentyman

    kentyman Senior member

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    For the record, the most insightful posts I've read regarding shoe care and shoe construction have come from you two, respectively.

    Regarding shoe construction in particular, I really wish I could see it first hand. MoneyWellSpent, I've read your posts thrice over sometimes, but still have a hard time grasping all of the construction spatially without seeing it done in person.
     
  14. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    glenjay and moneywellspent thank you for your answers
     
  15. ddgdl

    ddgdl Well-Known Member

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    So I just received a pair of AE's bourbon strands, and decided to apply some Reno...only to remove a large chunk of the bourbon coloring. oops. I didn't think Reno would do that, but apparently I was mistaken. Now my left is somewhere between walnut and bourbon- I'm attempting to fix it by using dark brown AE polish. Any other suggestions?
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  16. TheSizzle

    TheSizzle Senior member

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    Right when I got mine, I applied lotion, and there was definitely a bit of grey residue that came up. If that's what you're talking about, I don't think you need to worry. I just let that happen because it was a very light amount of residue, and I treated them normally. As you saw, they turned out just fine. Maybe you should post a picture.
     
  17. ddgdl

    ddgdl Well-Known Member

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    This was more than a little bit of grey residue- this was brown/black on the cloth. I'll take some photos. And to clarify- I meant Renovateur, not Renomat.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  18. ddgdl

    ddgdl Well-Known Member

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    Photos- the difference is most obvious in the middle photo, and by the laces in the first photo.
    .[​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  19. MoneyWellSpent

    MoneyWellSpent Senior member

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    Thanks for the generous complements.
     
  20. ddgdl

    ddgdl Well-Known Member

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    Any expert advice? Or should I just bite the bullet and do the same to the right shoe to try and match them up again?
     

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