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Official Guitar, Amp, Pedals, and Gear Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Piobaire, Feb 25, 2010.

  1. origenesprit

    origenesprit Senior member

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    Music store websites are busy on April 1st
     
  2. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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  3. El Argentino

    El Argentino Senior member

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    Last edited: May 12, 2015
  4. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    pB yanking the chains today.
     
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  5. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    I'm holding out for the "Serious This Time" Historic Reissue.
     
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  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    What's the groupthink of refinishing vintage instruments? I am not talking late fifties Gibsons, but I have seen a lot of like mid to late 60's Jazz Basses for very reasonable prices, yet most of them I hate the color. Would it take a major hit in value if I got it refinished in a different color, or would I be better off just getting a Custom Shop at that point?
     
  7. origenesprit

    origenesprit Senior member

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    Please don't do that. Find one that's already been refinished - you'll save yourself losing half the value, and if you get it re-refinished, the value is the same.

    Also where are you seeing 60's Jazz basses that are all original for reasonable prices?
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2015
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  8. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  9. gomestar

    gomestar Senior member

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    this.




    Christ that could have been a disaster.
     
  10. origenesprit

    origenesprit Senior member

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    If you're finding them for less than 5k you're probably being swindled.
     
  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    @hendrix I'm having trouble memorizing what seems like a barrage of information that I get in my lessons. Things like knowing notes in scales, and chords off the top of my head, or even relationships between scales (shared notes and such). I find that I can figure out these things when I sit and think about it, but I feel it becomes an issue when trying to improvise. Do you have any advice that could help me remember this stuff? I kind of feel like it is one of those things that isn't easy and just doing it more gets you there, but with my limited amount of time to really play I feel like I am doomed to never really understand it all.
     
  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'll add that my guitar teacher is like some sort of savant. When he plays he doesn't really have patterns memorized at all, he just knows what notes are in certain keys/scales and knows where all of those notes are across the neck. It's amazing, but makes me feel inadequate, especially since I have played the instrument for so many years. Our lessons have been more about theory and less about learning tunes because I can learn songs myself easily, but understanding the theory and being able to "noodle" more is where I'd like to develop. That said, even learning new scales has developed by technique a lot.
     
  13. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    I used to get bummed out at how proficient professional musicians are vs. me and then I started to remind myself how lost they would be doing my job.

    I had a conversation with a guy in his mid-50s that has been gigging his entire life in the LA area. He says for any given key he sees the entire fretboard with green lights for notes that are in key. That's probably what one needs to develop to noodle competently.
     
  14. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    For sure, I was getting bummed out at a lesson and my teacher was like, "look man, I am not gonna lie, there's no easy way to learn this stuff vs just playing it and doing it. You have a life, you have a job, I've been hanging around playing guitar for 14 hours a day since I was a little kid. Don't get down about it, just enjoy learning at your own pace."

    He even told me once in a sullen kind of way how he struggles to listen to modern music because the notes, the changes and everything just literally sounds the same to him. He said there are so many commonalities in notes and their relationships to one another that he hears it as just all the same scale, objectively. He really comes across as hearing music in a way that is almost painful. He has so much knowledge that it is a burden it seems.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2015
  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    This has reminded me of an old interview that I read some time ago with Carlos Dengler of interpol. I've always loved the harmony in their music and his basswork. I found the old interview and some of what I have been struggling with reminded me of some of this old interview:

    With the sharp looks of an international agent, Interpol’s Carlos D. steers New York’s indie-rock sensation with stylized but grounded bass lines. There is an intensity and aggression in his delivery, yet Carlos D. captures the more artful and introspective essence of post-punk on the band’s new release, Antics [Matador]. “I often try to hit notes a 16th-note ahead of where listeners would normally expect to hear them,” points out Carlos, who spices his driving, pickstyle lines with syncopated octave accents. “That creates the syncopated, funky feel of players like the Cure’s Simon Gallup, Peter Hook of Joy Division and New Order, and Duran Duran’s John Taylor.”


    Carlos credits his childhood guitar teacher with providing the tools he uses when constructing bass lines. “He would teach me about chords and scales, and he’d force me to do things like name the notes in a scale or chord. I hated it at the time-I just wanted to learn Iron Maiden songs-but later on it opened a world of music appreciation for me.

    "The chords Daniel [Kessler] plays on guitar are often sparse and ambiguous, so I can inject a new tonality into what he’s playing. I think, What can I do inside this chord to give it that extra push?
    The guitars are providing melancholic, atmospheric tones, and [drummer] Sam Fogarino and I add a driving rhythmic feel that complements the lighter guitar textures.” Frontman Paul Banks sums up Carlos’s contributions: “His musicianship and art are a phenomenon. His parts, in all their depth and complexity, always seem to appear spontaneously."

    Carlos D. is less meticulous when it comes to gear. "I don’t have that sense of culture that a lot of gearheads have. I have a Sid Vicious attitude toward the bass itself-I’m going to bleed on the thing before the show is over, anyway.” Carlos has used the same black Fender Standard Jazz Bass for both Antics and its predecessor, Turn On the Bright Lights [Matador]. Using medium-gauge GHS Boomers, he keeps his instrument tuned DADG. “It’s the tuning I’ve used since I joined the band. It’s tough because the low D string flaps a little, but since Daniel writes in D minor and B minor a lot, I want to reach those lower notes."

    Carlos prefers to run without any effects, plugging direct into his Ampeg SVT Classic and SVT 8x10 cabinet. "Our music is almost symphonic in nature, because the harmonic structures are defined by the union of two guitars and a bass, and sometimes keyboard as well. If I were to start freaking out with effects, it would create too much of a bass presence, or it would distract from the band’s most important aspect-the unity of all those musical elements together.”
     
  16. hendrix

    hendrix Senior member

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    Nah, this is bullshit. You do absolutely get better at knowing what notes are and where they are, but for every lick he plays that's straight from that knowledge, there's 10 that are memorised or semi-memorised little themes that he has that go over certain chord changes.

    That's not to cheapen it or make it seem like it's some type of trick. It's just that when you learn this repertoire of licks and actually know how they're constructed and what notes are going into them and why they work, that in itself actually helps you get a better understanding of where the notes are.

    Would you learn an arpeggio without knowing what the chord is? No, that would make things very difficult. This is the same. You have multiple tools at your disposal and one of the best ways of going about it is just to learn a shitload of chords, licks, and whole jazz solos that have been transcribed. You need to attack the problem from lots of different angles and break it down.
     
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  17. hendrix

    hendrix Senior member

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    But yeah, that doesn't mean shirking the hard stuff. You have to do the hard stuff too, obviously. There's no substitute for learning as many notes and as many chords as you can and trying to get faster and faster with your memory. But just understand that all the other stuff you're doing should feed into that too.
     
  18. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Thanks, Hendrix. One thing that I'm doing now is trying to play scales in thirds and fifths, for example rather than playing a G major scale like, G, A, B, C... Playing G, B, A, Db, B, D#... (In case of thirds)
     
  19. hendrix

    hendrix Senior member

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    Interesting. You're going to have a sharp 4 and a sharp 5 if you're playing over a G major, which is a really cool sound.

    I'm sure your teacher has probably told you that playing root notes and to a lesser degree 5ths is really uncool for jazz players. Leave that shit to the bass player.
     

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