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Unfunded Liabilities: a/k/a The Cloth Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Manton, Feb 10, 2008.

  1. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

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    I can wear that during Spring and Winter, as long as the temperature is under 20 degrees C
     
  2. whnay.

    whnay. Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Same temp as my office!
     
  3. ~ B ~

    ~ B ~ Senior member

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  4. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

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    That is actually quiet cold for office environment.
     
  5. sprout2

    sprout2 Senior member

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    Why was Sportex discontinued?
     
  6. medtech_expat

    medtech_expat Senior member

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    Would appreciate if someone could advise whether the often-referenced Lesser Tropical is in fact the same 8/9oz. displayed on the Harissons website. Also, any opinion on Smiths tropical weight?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  7. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    yes, it is the same. Superior to the smith
     
  8. medtech_expat

    medtech_expat Senior member

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  9. M. Charles

    M. Charles Senior member

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    kevin & howlin handwoven donegal

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    can a herringbone be donegal? :confused:
     
  11. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  12. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    because donegal is that dot pattern, or so I thought.
     
  13. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    My understanding is that "Donegal" refers to tweed spun in the Irish region of that name, but since the plain-woven flecked pattern has become so iconic, it has become known as "Donegal" regardless of where it's from. The flecks are from the way the yarn itself is processed, so they can appear in weaves other than plain.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
    2 people like this.
  14. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    there is nothing distinct about the weave? It's just a matter of where it's from?
     
  15. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The weave doesn't cause the flecks--the yarn does. So you can plain weave or herringbone weave the cloth and get the same flecked look.

    Any tweed from Donegal is "Donegal" tweed, which can be flecked or not. Yet, any tweed with that flecked look can also be called "Donegal." It refers to either an origin or a style.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  16. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    the flecks are not inherent to Donegal. 1) Many donegals have no flecks (also known as "heather"). Many non-Donegals DO have it. EG, I have a harris tweed that is very well heathered.
     
  17. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    A tweed from Donegal can obviously be rightfully called a "Donegal" tweed. It may or may not have flecks. The flecks are from the way the yarn is processed. If a tweed NOT from Donegal has those flecks, and the flecks are caused by the same thing (nubs in the yarn itself), that tweed can also be called "Donegal." At least, that has been the practice. In other words, if you see a nubby flecked tweed in a book somewhere, it may be labeled "Donegal," yet not be from Donegal.

    So, theoretically, you could have a Harris Donegal tweed (or Donegal Harris, whatever).
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
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  18. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Harris though has very specific characteristics (in addition to where it was from). The yarn is very rough and fat, which makes the tweed extremely dense and scratchy, and the cloth thick and heavy. True harris is supposed to be hand woven on half width looms, using homespun yarn. Ie, it's basically a home made product almost totally lacking in polish.

    Donegal yarn is much smaller, the weave is tighter, and the cloth is a lot thinner, less rustic.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  19. mafoofan

    mafoofan Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I guess it comes down to what is causing the flecking. If the flecks are nubs in the yarn as a result of the wool being washed and felted before being spun into it, the tweed is then a Donegal-style tweed, regardless of where it's from. For example, I have a "Donegal" tweed jacket made from Porter & Harding cloth, but I have no idea where it's actually from. It's just called Donegal because of the sort of flecks it has.

    So, it seems to me, if Harris tweed is defined by both the yarn type and place of origin, and such yarn cannot be spun to have such nubs, than a so-nubbed tweed from Harris is a Donegal tweed and not a Harris tweed, even if it is from Harris. If the yarn can be spun in Harris to qualify as Harris tweed yarn and have those nubs, then you have a Harris Donegal tweed.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  20. Eustace Tilley

    Eustace Tilley Senior member

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    Both Molloy and Magee sell herringbone donegals, so I'm with Foo on this one.
     

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