The official thrift/discount store bragging thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by j, Mar 2, 2005.

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  1. Nataku

    Nataku Senior member

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    You have apparently gathered up some split-suit karma. Will you please fly down here and accompany me to a couple of Goodwills? If I see one more Belvest, Oxxford, or Zegna orphaned suit jacket hanging next to Canali, RLPL, or HF suit pants I'm going to have to do the old flaming monk thing in the parking lot. Please, God, make them stop!



    My advice to the new guys:
    1) have patience
    2) go often
    3) learn the brands and/or learn how to tell quality
    4) try not to be caught up in the rush when you do find something. An Oxxford with a couple of moth holes is not a good find. Maybe one out of 100 of us would actually spend the $100+ bucks to get it re-woven. As much as it hurts just leave it.
    5) NEVER leave Kiton or RLPL. That stuff is pure gold on ebay: even the slightly damaged, out of date suff.
    6) Even if it's in perfect shape you really shouldn't wear a 6 on 1 DB with massive shoulder pads and triple-pleated pants.
    7) On the other hand, no one but one of us cares if it's unvented or double-pleated, as long as the rest of the coat's style is recent and the pants aren't baggy.
    8) If a shoe doesn't fit there's no way to will it to fit.
    9) If that suit is 2 sizes too small you're not ever going to lose the weight.
    10) No; you really can't get away with wearing a long if you're 5'8", even if it is a BNWOT Etro.
    11) Re-thrift your mistakes: I promise you that no one on the B&S is going to buy them. It'll just make you look like an idiot.
    12) Don't give away your spots to anyone you don't trust - I gave away my former best spot to a guy on here who send me a sob-story PM. He was a [​IMG] flipper who nuked that place for over a year until he moved.
    13) Don't be embarrassed to tell others that your stuff is thrifted. I get far more compliments over how little I paid than when I was just trying to impress people with the brands.


    I have to agree, I'm very happy with how often I find the trousers or jacket to a separated suit. I do find a lot of orphans, too.


    Also, excellent advice on all counts. I'd like to emphasize #7 and #8, as those were my biggest mistakes starting out. I used to grab Canali, Zegna, etc whenever I saw it. The stuff had huge shoulders, a gorge about level with the armpits and sub- super 100s wool.

    I'm very discerning now and even if it's Zegna or something, I'll only grab stuff that won't look out of place today.
     


  2. potemkin_city_limits

    potemkin_city_limits Senior member

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    Today I came across a fairly new pair of Ralph Lauren penny loafers in size 13.5 which is definitely not my size, but I have a close friend who has an impossible time finding nice shoes and they should fit him perfectly. I also found some equally nice Brooks Brothers loafers in my size.
     


  3. SLOB12

    SLOB12 New Member

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    ^Good advice on all points.

    Most of the time--almost all the time--whether something is worth buying is immediately obvious (check condition very closely, though, don't get in a rush). If you find that you're trying to talk yourself into buying something then you probably need to leave it.


    ***********

    I have found out that that Thriftying has actually made me a better shopper: since price isn't the definining factor, I pay more attention to quality and craftsmanship.

    But yeah, when I fournd my first Zegna coat, I was all excited and bought it and then I realized once I got it home that I really, really didn't like the cut or fabric or the fit of it. LOL.

    Theo
     


  4. Boss1982

    Boss1982 Well-Known Member

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    First time in a thrift store today and I found a khaki color J.crew trench coat and a loro piana cream colored half zip knit! Both for less than $16.00. The items are in good condition, they just need some dry cleaning.
     


  5. catside

    catside Senior member

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    Great advice by EBTX66

    Today just one Talbott best of class tie. NWOT condition, 2.99. Tag was STAPLED! Thankfully came out w/o any problem. Passed size 8 Alden monks: was small, calf, rubber soled, and well worn. Oh well! I will get those shells eventually.
     


  6. cptjeff

    cptjeff Senior member

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    Great advice by EBTX66

    Today just one Talbott best of class tie. NWOT condition, 2.99. Tag was STAPLED! Thankfully came out w/o any problem. Passed size 8 Alden monks: was small, calf, rubber soled, and well worn. Oh well! I will get those shells eventually.


    My favorite place at home staples just about everything, and I've never had a garment be ruined by them, though I don't buy a whole lot of ties. It's really pretty much the same as a pin or two.
     


  7. 83glt

    83glt Senior member

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    Great advice by EBTX66

    +1

    Any newbie thrifters looking for a beginner's guide, this is it.
     


  8. greekgeek

    greekgeek Senior member

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    Also, excellent advice on all counts. I'd like to emphasize #7 and #8, as those were my biggest mistakes starting out. I used to grab Canali, Zegna, etc whenever I saw it. The stuff had huge shoulders, a gorge about level with the armpits and sub- super 100s wool.

    I'm very discerning now and even if it's Zegna or something, I'll only grab stuff that won't look out of place today.


    Overall I agree with this sentiment and I will add one useful bit of advice regarding the the outdated or perhaps mothbitten Oxxford, Zegna et al: if the jackets are inexpensive enough they can be a terrific way to acquire beautiful sets of buttons.
     


  9. username79

    username79 Senior member

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    9/10 times yeah they do,whats your problem?
    You're completely incorrect. Nice RTW suits typically have unfinished sleeves or quickly finished (buttons, no sown buttonholes) because you are supposed to have your sleeves tailored to the length of your arms. Crazy thought, I know. "Surgeons cuffs" should be done by your tailor otherwise they are simply just a poseur's affectation, though some would argue that they already are..
     


  10. Nataku

    Nataku Senior member

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    My favorite place at home staples just about everything, and I've never had a garment be ruined by them, though I don't buy a whole lot of ties. It's really pretty much the same as a pin or two.

    Yeah, the Salvation Armies in the TC use stapled tags. I've found a method to remove them very carefully and leave no signs that they were ever there. I do prefer these to the plastic tag things that usually leave a small hole in the garment.

    You're completely incorrect. Nice RTW suits typically have unfinished sleeves or quickly finished (buttons, no sown buttonholes) because you are supposed to have your sleeves tailored to the length of your arms. Crazy thought, I know. "Surgeons cuffs" should be done by your tailor otherwise they are simply just a poseur's affectation, though some would argue that they already are..


    My thoughts exactly. Of all the high-end suits I've come across in 8+ years, only a handful have had surgeon's cuffs and most of those were bespoke or MTM. To add to this, of all the Brioni jackets I've founds, not one has had functional buttons, which is great for me.
     


  11. frenchy

    frenchy In Time Out

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    You're completely incorrect. Nice RTW suits typically have unfinished sleeves or quickly finished (buttons, no sown buttonholes) because you are supposed to have your sleeves tailored to the length of your arms. Crazy thought, I know. "Surgeons cuffs" should be done by your tailor otherwise they are simply just a poseur's affectation, though some would argue that they already are..

    that would be correct IF THEY WERE NEW.however this is used clothing so usually the step you are referring to has already been done by the owner.
     


  12. frenchy

    frenchy In Time Out

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    Yeah, the Salvation Armies in the TC use stapled tags. I've found a method to remove them very carefully and leave no signs that they were ever there. I do prefer these to the plastic tag things that usually leave a small hole in the garment.




    My thoughts exactly. Of all the high-end suits I've come across in 8+ years, only a handful have had surgeon's cuffs and most of those were bespoke or MTM. To add to this, of all the Brioni jackets I've founds, not one has had functional buttons, which is great for me.


    i dont know,maybe we are getting a different batch up here in canada,but every item from Brioni,Kiton and Isaia i have ever seen/had/bought has had surgeon cuffs.
    maybe its a geographical thing,but please people dont tell me what i saw or didnt see.
     


  13. TheWGP

    TheWGP Senior member

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    Yeah, the Salvation Armies in the TC use stapled tags. I've found a method to remove them very carefully and leave no signs that they were ever there. I do prefer these to the plastic tag things that usually leave a small hole in the garment.

    Want to share the method? I've usually settled for trying to pry up the prongs, slip one side off, then the other. Unfortunately I occasionally still get holes in things like shirt collars.
     


  14. EBTX66

    EBTX66 Senior member

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    Overall I agree with this sentiment and I will add one useful bit of advice regarding the the outdated or perhaps mothbitten Oxxford, Zegna et al: if the jackets are inexpensive enough they can be a terrific way to acquire beautiful sets of buttons.

    You are absolutely right! I forgot to mention that. Vintage suits that were unwearable have still yielded me two sets of MOP suit buttons. Good call.
     


  15. catside

    catside Senior member

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    You are absolutely right! I forgot to mention that. Vintage suits that were unwearable have still yielded me two sets of MOP suit buttons. Good call.

    Don't forget blazer buttons, and leather buttons.
     


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