Steak Dinner

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by DNW, Jul 2, 2009.

  1. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    mad props to dnw. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. SField

    SField Senior member

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    I also like a nicely crusted strip with a pat of butter on top and only salt and pepper.

    But thats when I buy a 28+ day dry aged steak from the local butcher. The beefy flavour is condensed to the point I dont need much else.

    What kind of stuff do you like with other steaks?

    K


    I'm actually not the biggest steak eater in the classic sense of the word. The restaurants I like don't ever just serve up a big piece of naked beef... there's always a sauce and a sort of larger concept than just a quivering mass of protein.

    I still like the filet best. Since I prefer fairly clean flavors, Ribeye can actually make me feel a little ill if it's well marbled. I prefer the very tender yet very lean taste of a great filet. Preparations I've liked included king crab and a hollandaise, sliced filet with greens and an apple vinnaigrette...

    I don't get terribly excited about a big piece of meat anymore, but when I do make steak for my friends I'll probably sear it in a pan along with a crushed clove of garlic, rosemary, thyme and a veal or chicken stock (basting constantly). For me that is far tastier than the american concept of eating beef. When they oversalt it and baste it in butter you end up eating what feels like a giant piece of bacon. Eating at Smith and Wollensky and places like that literally makes me sick.

    For me a filet needs to be rare, but still a slight springing back to the touch (not too lively a spring or you're in med rare territory). Fattier cuts including wagyu (which usually has a much better fat distribution than a normal beef ribeye) should be a really good medium rare so that the fat is activated properly, but a lot of morons in the United States who don't know Wagyu cook it rare which makes no sense.

    I should add that if I eat steak it's mainly Bison now. It's leaner and it actually has a flavor that is slightly different from beef, and a little more bold. I urge anyone who hasn't tried good Bison to give it a go. It's healthier, the farmers that produce them often have better practices (since it is a niche market), and frankly I think it tastes better.
     
  3. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

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    I'm actually not the biggest steak eater in the classic sense of the word. The restaurants I like don't ever just serve up a big piece of naked beef... there's always a sauce and a sort of larger concept than just a quivering mass of protein.

    I still like the filet best. Since I prefer fairly clean flavors, Ribeye can actually make me feel a little ill if it's well marbled. I prefer the very tender yet very lean taste of a great filet. Preparations I've liked included king crab and a hollandaise, sliced filet with greens and an apple vinnaigrette...

    I don't get terribly excited about a big piece of meat anymore, but when I do make steak for my friends I'll probably sear it in a pan along with a crushed clove of garlic, rosemary, thyme and a veal or chicken stock (basting constantly). For me that is far tastier than the american concept of eating beef. When they oversalt it and baste it in butter you end up eating what feels like a giant piece of bacon. Eating at Smith and Wollensky and places like that literally makes me sick.

    For me a filet needs to be rare, but still a slight springing back to the touch (not too lively a spring or you're in med rare territory). Fattier cuts including wagyu (which usually has a much better fat distribution than a normal beef ribeye) should be a really good medium rare so that the fat is activated properly, but a lot of morons in the United States who don't know Wagyu cook it rare which makes no sense.

    I should add that if I eat steak it's mainly Bison now. It's leaner and it actually has a flavor that is slightly different from beef, and a little more bold. I urge anyone who hasn't tried good Bison to give it a go. It's healthier, the farmers that produce them often have better practices (since it is a niche market), and frankly I think it tastes better.


    I've always liked the beefy and buttery flavour of a big hunk of meat. Filet tends to leave me wanting as it doesnt fulill the beefiness requirement.

    I do appreciate your point about cooking a more fatty and marbled piece of meat a little more. I actually find I like a thick ribeye a little over med-rare as the fat has a chance to soften and start to melt a little. Rare / med-rare tends to leave the fat in more distinct segments which I dont like (even in well marbled meat).

    I've only ever had Wagyu sliced very thin, I dont really see the point in a big hunk of it, never mind making a burger out of it.

    Will have to try bison sometime, it's not something we get over here.

    K
     
  4. SField

    SField Senior member

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    I've always liked the beefy and buttery flavour of a big hunk of meat. Filet tends to leave me wanting as it doesnt fulill the beefiness requirement.

    I do appreciate your point about cooking a more fatty and marbled piece of meat a little more. I actually find I like a thick ribeye a little over med-rare as the fat has a chance to soften and start to melt a little. Rare / med-rare tends to leave the fat in more distinct segments which I dont like (even in well marbled meat).

    I've only ever had Wagyu sliced very thin, I dont really see the point in a big hunk of it, never mind making a burger out of it.

    Will have to try bison sometime, it's not something we get over here.

    K


    In a way Bison is more beef than actual Beef. It has the flavor of beef without the fat of beef.

    Most chefs prefer filet over anything but I can understand why people like it. Wagyu is incredible in it's own way, but I'd recommend only 6 to 8 oz. That's the other benefit of a filet, the portions are better.
     
  5. Cavalier

    Cavalier Senior member

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    when it comes to sauces au'poivre with brandy is my favorite, but I am usually disappointed with the blandness that most restaurants serve.. mine has a spicey kick [​IMG]
     
  6. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    i agree with sfield. The great thing about filet is how well it goes with sauces, and how easily you can integrate it with other parts of the meal. I can count the number of times i've ordered a steak at a restaurant. I eat it twice a week at home because it's so easy to do, and i have so little time to cook during the week.

    Has anyone ever had alpaca? I had it in peru. It's got a different taste, but I honestly prefer beef.
     
  7. lee_44106

    lee_44106 Senior member

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  8. edmorel

    edmorel Quality Seller!! Dubiously Honored

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    I thought you never cooked steak on the stove and had contempt for anyone who did? [​IMG]

    that's what happens when you spend almost five figures on a stove and hood [​IMG]

    still think that grilling outside over hardwood charcoal is best though.
     
  9. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    that's what happens when you spend almost five figures on a stove and hood [​IMG]

    still think that grilling outside over hardwood charcoal is best though.


    Nice to see that you're moving up to cooking your food instead of just clubbing your prey and eating it raw off the bone.
     
  10. SField

    SField Senior member

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    that's what happens when you spend almost five figures on a stove and hood [​IMG]

    still think that grilling outside over hardwood charcoal is best though.


    You can make a much more flavorful steak in a cast iron pan.
     
  11. edmorel

    edmorel Quality Seller!! Dubiously Honored

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  12. premo

    premo Senior member

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    Why butter and oil?
     
  13. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    Why butter and oil?

    Butter for the flavor, oil to raise the smoking point.
     
  14. premo

    premo Senior member

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    Which oil? The temperatures vary a lot.
     
  15. DNW

    DNW Senior member

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    Which oil? The temperatures vary a lot.

    Canola. I prefer grapeseed, but I ran out.
     

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