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Shirts: Extended shoulder line, slopy shoulders, comfort and aesthetics

sartorial_marxist

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I have always been on a quest to perfect the fit of my shirts. Much is discussed about the fit and construction of jackets in this forum, however there seems to be a dearth of discourse regarding shirts. I hope this thread will serve as a pioneer or melting point.

I always had an issue with where the shoulder line should end. I have many shirts, some with extended shoulder lines, higher shoulder lines or shoulder lines that end exactly on the shoulders.

I guess most of us are not blessed with straight shoulders, we tend to have slopy shoulders, to what extent is another issue. I tend to have rather slopy shoulders myself and found out that it creates a lot of problem aesthetic wise especially in relation to the placement of the shoulder line.

From my personal journey, I have these observations/conclusions to make and I welcome any constructive comments;

1. Extended shoulder line: Gives more comfort, there is less strain on the top 2 buttons, sleeves won't do a "deltoid hug" during movement and shoulder line stays in place. Most importantly, aesthetic wise, it gives off a more "masculine" look - illusion of broader shoulders and trimmer waist. The illusion of broader shoulders also makes one's head less prominent, giving a more proportionate outlook.

However, the benefits are affected by the "cleaness" of the drape of the cloth on the shirt front. There tends to be slight bunching. I really do not know how to solve this, well at least my tailor is not competent enough.

2. Higher shoulder line: I personally don't like the look of this. I guess the benefit is that it helps in creating a very "clean drape" of the shirt cloth on the body. Citing PG for example, his shoulder line is slightly higher and there "cleaness" is evident. But personally, I have comfort issues with this. My slopy shoulders tend to add tension to the first 2 buttons and the shirt is "pulled around" when the collar button and first button is undone.

Also, I think its rather aesthetically unpleasing for those with slopy shoulders. I cite PG as an example again. No offence, but the higher shoulder line merely makes his very slopy shoulders more prominent. Furthermore, it doesn't give him the width he needs at the top to fend up the girth of his thighs. Also, it makes his head very prominent. All in all, it gives off a very unproportionate image.

I also realised that many tailors interpret this characteristic as part of a "slim-fit", I deduce this from my experience with Peter Lee and a couple of my locals.

I would like to know where do we seek reconcilation between these two. Or are there any techniques whatsoever to help improve the fit, comfort or aesthetic?

Please discuss! I would appreciate constructive comments.
 

teddieriley

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Pics, or i have no clue what you are talking about.
 

Joenobody0

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This is a very interesting topic that I haven't fully come to terms with. It would be great if you could post some pictures illustrating your point.
 

Sanguis Mortuum

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Originally Posted by sartorial_marxist
Most importantly, aesthetic wise, it gives off a more "masculine" look - illusion of broader shoulders and trimmer waist.

This is the case with jackets, but not so much with shirts. The shoulders of a shirt are not supported, so any extra width just drops over the end of the shoulder the same as the sleeve would, and the wearers shoulders will still just look as wide as they actually are.

Basically, the shoulder seam should fall where your shoulder ends. Period. (Though how exactly you determine that point is open to interpretation)
 

SpallaCamiccia

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Originally Posted by teddieriley
Pics, or i have no clue what you are talking about.

+1
 

scurvyfreedman

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Originally Posted by Sanguis Mortuum
This is the case with jackets, but not so much with shirts. The shoulders of a shirt are not supported, so any extra width just drops over the end of the shoulder the same as the sleeve would, and the wearers shoulders will still just look as wide as they actually are.

Basically, the shoulder seam should fall where your shoulder ends. Period. (Though how exactly you determine that point is open to interpretation)



+1

When a shirt is extended beyond and drops over the shoulder it makes the shirt look like it doesn't fit. A pure OTR look IMO.
 

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