1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Scent/Fragrance of the Day thread

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by Dmax, Aug 22, 2007.

  1. stayhealthy

    stayhealthy Member

    Messages:
    12
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2012
    hey guys, can perfume age and smell even better or stronger after some time on the shelves at home?
     
  2. olivier.nyc

    olivier.nyc Senior member

    Messages:
    134
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Location:
    New York, NY
    SOTD: Chanel Allure. Edition Blanche. (ATF)
     
  3. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

    Messages:
    15,833
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2010
    Location:
    St. Louis
    

    I'm a big fan of that one. I don't like anything else in the Allure series, but Edition Blanche is really wonderful.
     
  4. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,790
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Location:
    Monaco
    

    It can CHANGE, given oxidation, settling of the oils, etc. but it's not something that ages like a wine or scotch. So, no, I don't think really you could say it smells "better" if you mean an improvement upon what the parfumeur wants it to be the minute (s)he puts it in the bottle. It goes in at its peak and changes/degrades from there.

    My guess as to the "better" or "stronger" you describe has more to do with climate/weather in which you are wearing it than the actual juice chemistry. Many comes alive or project differently in different weather.

    For example, I had some Il Profumo Aventure that I received during the summer months and was terribly disappointed... flat, boring, no projection. I nearly sold it off or traded it, but then gave it a try again in October/November and it was like an entirely different fragrance... deep, warm, rich, lovely. So, one could say it "aged" better, but in reality it was just the change of the seasons (hot/humid vs. cool/dry).
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2012
  5. Mr_Incognito

    Mr_Incognito Senior member

    Messages:
    379
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2009
    Today Vintage Furyo

    I also blind bought an EdT bottle of Dunhill Blend 30 as many say it's very similar to Patou Pour Homme, but I found it nowhere close to the masterpiece. This bottle is definitely going to my Dad.
     
  6. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

    Messages:
    15,140
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Location:
    Waiting for Saturday to Come

    That's a damn good question and one that warrants a discussion for sure. I've got some Chanel Cuir de Russie eau de cologne that smells a LOT more potent than the current parfum extrait. This vintage stuff came in it's original box and never, and I mean never, opened because the rubber stopper that is covered with stamped foil was intact and it's impossible to reinsert. Of all things for me to have experienced vintage, it would be something like this - perfect.

    Perfumes change for sure, like Prof Fabulous stated, and I agree that most change for the worse because the top and middle notes can degrade, so "fresher" or "lighter" would probably worsen over time. But I think that, based on a personal preference, that a perfume can improve over time. This is evidenced by discussions I've read and watched about Oud oil and the fact that you must allow some tincturing/blending to macerate for several months, like ambergris, to achieve the highest quality. Of course, I'm referring to mere months of a process as opposed to years that was posed in stayhealthy's question.

    All that being said, there's so many variables that occur over the decades if you're comparing vintage versus current formulations as well as the context in which you're wearing it (like the Professor stated), and so you have to have a good scent memory. Or, you can just say "Fuck, this smells good!"

    This question makes me think of Madeira wines, where you essentially have oxidized and overheated wine that ends up tasting delicious.
     
  7. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

    Messages:
    15,140
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Location:
    Waiting for Saturday to Come
    Wearing a new vetiver perfume that I bought at a local maker and shop called In Fiore. It's a lovely scent, which is being phased out by them - in fact, it's no longer listed on their website (the perfume is simply called Vetiver). It's a light vetiver with plumeria that is bound to the vetiver by a hint of saffron.
     
  8. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

    Messages:
    15,140
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Location:
    Waiting for Saturday to Come
    

    Totally agree with Comme Des Garcons. They are modern while being totally different from the the multitudes of new fragrances released every year - "avant garde" and cerebral without making you uncomfortable.
     
  9. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

    Messages:
    27,312
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Location:
    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    

    Eh, Avignon makes me think I'm getting it from a priest in a rectory. So in that sense, yes, its a bit uncomfortable.
     
  10. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

    Messages:
    15,833
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2010
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Switched into Rose Oud for the evening. It's one of those fragrances I can't imagine anyone disliking.
     
  11. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,790
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Location:
    Monaco
    Must de Cartier II for me today. This one is a weird one, with a weirder history. Originally, Must de Cartier (the dark, green, smokey one) in the 1980's was just a parfum, for which the EdT was a completely different fragrance. This confused the hell out of buyers, so they changed the name to "II" in the 1990's, while releasing an EdT concentration of the original parfum as "Must." "II" was then discontinued not too terribly long thereafter. It's an equally odd scent, fresh, clean, yet darkly weird... as confusing as the original Must, but without the civet explosion.
     
  12. Homme

    Homme Senior member

    Messages:
    1,678
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Timbuktu today. Dry, woody, without any one note in particular jumping out.
     
  13. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

    Messages:
    15,833
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2010
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Today I am wearing a newish fragrance called Portrait of a Lady. I think some of you would really enjoy it if you tried it. (It's not much talked about in the fragrance community, so you may not have heard of it until just now.)
     
  14. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

    Messages:
    15,140
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Location:
    Waiting for Saturday to Come

    I'm sorry about your butt hymen.
     
  15. HORNS

    HORNS Senior member

    Messages:
    15,140
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2008
    Location:
    Waiting for Saturday to Come
    

    One of the most decadent openings, huh?
     
  16. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

    Messages:
    15,833
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2010
    Location:
    St. Louis
    

    Yeah, the opening is really outrageous.
     
  17. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

    Messages:
    29,119
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Location:
    Texas
    

    I'm working off a decant. Did you wind up getting a bottle after all?


    Sometimes, yes, sometimes no. As HORNS noted, sometimes a scent needs time to macerate - in some cases it's weeks or even months. That said, I've heard from people who picked up an old bottle of Angel which they couldn't stand at first, and all of a sudden it's perfect. More likely it's a matter of shifting tastes, seasons, and circumstances, but it's not all that odd to have the rough edges of a scent become smoothed over as the years pass.

    Today: Guerlain L'Instant. Not sure why other than the weather is uncertain.
     
  18. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

    Messages:
    27,312
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2007
    Location:
    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    

    Si! Its waiting for me back at casa de Rambo.
     
  19. 1969

    1969 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,662
    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
  20. Baron

    Baron Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    7,190
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2004
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    


    I don't think that's vintage. I have a bottle of the new stuff and the bottle of vintage. The new stuff is pale green like the juice in that bottle, and the vintage stuff is a rich golden color. Resident Pour Monsieur expert Thomas can chime in with his thoughts.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by