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Mixing horozontal strip with vertical?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by demeis, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. demeis

    demeis Senior member

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    I was at BB yesterday and they had some horizontal stripe shirts. I was wondering what people thought about mixing horizontal striped shirts with vertical striped suits? I'm really not sure if it would be a good look or a bad, right now i want to lean to the not attractive end. Also what about mixing vertical stripe suits with vertical stripe shirts? I've always not mixed them but i've seen a few that look good but seem to be trendy to me. Thoughts?
     
  2. NoVaguy

    NoVaguy Senior member

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    Having a hard time visualizing horizontal striped shirts with a vertical striped suit.

    As for vertical with vertical, I think you need to make suit that the stripes are of different dimensions/styles. It seems like it would be easier to do a thin, narrow striped shirt with a spaced out pin-striped suited.
     
  3. demeis

    demeis Senior member

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  4. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    To quote Victor Frankenstein (pronounced FRAHNK-un-steen), "It ... could ... work."

    Solid tie only, I think.  One or the other (shirt or suit) stripe should be really faint and subtle.  They should definitely be different scales.  I haven't tried this, admittedly, so it may be a disaster in waiting ...
     
  5. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

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    I have a great deal more experience with horizontally striped shirts than anyone should ever be subjected to ... nonetheless, Manton is correct. Some subtle striped suits work well with horizontal shirts. I have even seen instances where a boldly striped suit can work with a Gekko shirt. What I have concluded, though, is that it is simply a matter of trial and error. In other words, your taste is on trial and it is altogether too easy to make an error. Each combination needs to be judged on its own merits. Does it feel like they match? Is it pleasing to the eye? If you don't have an overabundance of confidence in your ability to "feel" a match ... or if your self-esteem isn't at an all time high, by all means go with the horizontal shirt but stay with a solid color suit. If you want the best available lesson in the wear and feeling of horizontally striped shirts, rent Wall Street for a night.
     
  6. lisapop

    lisapop Senior member

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    Sounds like BB are getting in-touch with their inner Johnnie Cochran, although didn't Master of the Universe Gordon Gekko also wear horizontally striped shirts in the film Wall Street? Nobody ever accused Ivan Boesky, after whom that character was based, of exemplifying good taste ("Greed is good"). I have always felt that the best-dressed men also don't look as though they've spent too much time contemplating their clothes, even if they do. Horizontally striped shirts suggest you're spending a tad too much time on yourself and that you are calling out for attention. Whenever someone compliments me on my clothes, I give them my "Aw shucks, this old thing?" routine, never letting on for a moment that my clothes are, indeed, top-of-mind with me. But, your attitude may vary.
    Grayson
     
  7. boston

    boston Senior member

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    I love horizontally striped shirts. I wear then with repp ties and solid suits, or solid tie and solid suit. I don't wear them with striped suits.

    -boston
     
  8. cuffthis

    cuffthis Senior member

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    Alex, Did you make the shirts for Flusser back then? Tom
     
  9. lisapop

    lisapop Senior member

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    Mel and Duke Gambert made most of the shirts for Alan Flusser's custom business back then, according to Alan Flusser himself. http://www.gambertshirts.com/ Grayson
     
  10. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

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    Joelle and I made all of the "custom" shirts sold in Alan's shop for a number of years. I honestly don't remember if those years included the year that Wall Street was filmed. However, if you are asking about the (horizontal) shirts Michael Douglas wore in the movie, those were not made through the custom shirt department at Alan's. Michael was measured and the shirts made and fitted in my shop on 57th street between 5th and 6th before I moved to Madison Ave.
     
  11. lisapop

    lisapop Senior member

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    Perhaps Mr. Flusser's memory then needs to be refreshed, based on the information I received from him recently indicating the Gamberts made most of his custom shirts back then. Mel Gambert's memory, and that of his son, Mitch, too, would need to be refreshed.
    Grayson
     
  12. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

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    I really don't think Alan would make that kind of mistake.
    Mel Gambert's company is located in Passaic, NJ and is called Mel Gambert Shirtmakers.
    Duke Gambert's company is called Newark Shirtmakers and is located in Newark, NJ.
    The Gambert brothers, Mel, Duke, and David, came to a parting of the ways back in the 1970's and have not made shirts together since then, each preferring to own his own company. Seems to run in the family ... Skip Gambert, Mel's nephew and former foreperson, has now had his own shirt company for almost a decade. Wonderful family ... all of whom know a hell of a lot about shirtmaking. But they do not work together and therefore the above statement could not possibly be correct.

    Henceforth, Marc, why don't you let me answer the questions which are directed to me? That way, I won't have to call you at your office again so that you can deny that you are you ... again.
     
  13. lisapop

    lisapop Senior member

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    And Stacey, Mr. Flusser's production director of his original company, may have a faulty memory about custom shirt suppliers, as well. [​IMG] Â But, that's ancient history. Â Sr. Mimmo Siviglia, an absolute gentleman, reigns supreme today as the finest custom shirtmaker in the world, and I'm fortunate enough to be able to wear his masterpieces. http://www.mimmosiviglia.com/ Grayson
     
  14. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

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    Now you've hit the nail on the head. The lovely Stacey is probably the main reason I can't remember the years I made shirts for Alan. Tell me, Marc, is she still as stunningly gorgeous as she was back in the 1980's?

    BTW Marc I feel your pain. Have Alex and Lissa been particularly burdensome these last few days? You seem to be on the cusp of having one of your predictable, periodic, juvenile meltdowns which cause you to get banned. I would hate to see that happen. Lisapop has been one of your more interesting pseudonyms.
     
  15. lisapop

    lisapop Senior member

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    This is getting really creepy.  Shirtmakers suffering "meltdowns" need to be fully aware, however, that there are strict laws against calling anyone at their office or home and engaging in harrassment and stalking, especially in the climate we're currently in, so if you don't want an FBI report filed on you, you'd be well-advised to exercise greater self-control and restraint.
    Grayson
     
  16. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I am not taking sides just adding what I remember. Mel was the youngest of the three brothers involved in the business on Lafayette st in Newark.(now called Gambert daughters) He left to open his own place. When I met him in the early 80's his factory was located in Harrison,NJ. The middle son David and his son, Skip also worked there. David retired. a year or or so later, Skip left Duke, the eldest of the three brothers in the business,(I think there was a 4th brother not working in the business) to work with his uncle Mel. Skip left after a few years to open his own factory in Newark. Mel has since moved his factory to East Newark. When Alan was using Mel to do his work, Mel's Son Mel Jr. worked there. Mitch was in high school. I would see him thereUsually spreading fabric. He was not very involved at that time. Alex did make The shirts for the movie Wall street. I remember Jose the skinny cutter who cut that order. I think Alex also made many shirts for Alan in the Denhof factory in Ct. Or was it the Denhof side on 57th street. It was a long time ago. I remember Stacey G very well. Where is she today. She was great at getting suppliers to ship even when Alan was behind on payments. The suits were made at that time by Greenfield or Adrian Jules. Raphael was one of several tailors over the years who did their best to get the clothes out the door. There was an Israeli tailor named Maurice who I had work with at the old Austin Ltd. store on east 55th street. Â I think he worked for Flusser before Raphael. I have never seen a more disoganized place then the shop in the penthouse in the east 50's. The amount of undelivered clothing was scary. They sold tons of suits. Unfortuately many of the customers did not understand the cut and were unhappy. I used to sell Alan fabric back then. I even bought fabric from Alan when he closed the trinity street location. I have not seen or spoken to Alan in years. I guess i need to find my way north of 42nd street every once in a while. Carl www.cego.com
     
  17. lisapop

    lisapop Senior member

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    This is all inside baseball, not of interest to most others.  Don't shoot the messenger---I was told in no uncertain words from Alan Flusser himself, and I have it in writing, that any other custom shirtmaker, other than the Gamberts, made shirts for Mr. Flusser for "about one minute" (A quote).  If anyone has a problem with that historical recollection, rather than having a "meltdown", take it up with Mr. Flusser.  
    Grayson
     
  18. Alexander Kabbaz

    Alexander Kabbaz Senior member

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    Someday we'll have to have a contest over who has forgotten more. But my memory has had ten years more than yours to lose it, so I would need a handicap. Maybe Stacey will be the referee? [​IMG]
     
  19. lisapop

    lisapop Senior member

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    By the way, Carl, Stacy is doing well. She has many interesting stories regarding shirtmakers who caused "meltdowns" during her time with Alan Flusser. Perhaps she'll share some of them here.
    Grayson
     
  20. MCA

    MCA Well-Known Member

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    Hi Mr. Grayson, since you've mentioned Sig. Siviglia, I would like to ask you a couple of questions, and share some of my recent findings that might be of interest.

    Have you tried a variety of collar styles on your Siviglia shirts, or rather  prefer to wear 1 particular style?  In my case I asked Maestro Siviglia to design a variety of collar details he thinks suit me, and so far he has created a wide spread and a slightly smaller medium spread for my dress shirts (in addition to the casual shirt custom collars). I must say I was very impressed with the results. Construction wise, these dress collars are not fused, but look perfectly flat as if they were fused, something I cannot say about any unfused collar I've seen, and unlike Borrelli et al., which rely on fused methods to achieve the look. They are quite substantial and have very wide removable collar stays. The style is outstanding: classic and subdued, but never matter-of-fact nor clinical. There's a slight roll and a certain asymmetry to them that work so well --the flair from the artist. On a side note --have you seen his edge stitched collars? These are truly edge stitched, unlike some others' supposedly edge-stitched examples I've seen.

    Have you asked for hand-made buttonholes on your shirts? Siviglia's machine-made are superb, but out of curiosity, I recently asked for hand-sewn button holes and buttons, and the results are sublime. I never liked hand-sewn before, because of what I've seen from Borrelli, Attolini et. al, but Siviglia's work is in a completely different category. I highly recommend them; however, on the very lightly-woven fabrics like batiste, it might be better to stick to machine-made.  

    Cheers.

    PS: This was a candid attempt to keep the discussion on the subjects we enjoy.

    Edit: I meant etamine, not batiste.
     

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