Ask A Question, Get An Answer... - Post All Quick Questions Here (Classic menswear)

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Master-Classter, Sep 28, 2008.

  1. dtmt

    dtmt Senior member

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  2. EZETHATSME

    EZETHATSME Senior member

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    is it ok to use the same polishing brush for burgundy and brown shoes?

    Totally fine. I use the same brush for my brown and black shoes all the time.

    EZ
     


  3. wetnose

    wetnose Senior member

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    I'd love some opinions on what color shirt to do with this tie. I've always worn it with lime green and want to diversify.

    [​IMG]

    I'm ordering the orange gingham shirt from moderntailor and already envision wearing it with that and a pair of light pants for summer.

    Thanks for all of your opinions.


    Try a light brown shirt, maybe with a faint check.

    Personally though, I'd burn that tie.
     


  4. Master-Classter

    Master-Classter Senior member

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    What goes well with a rust colored/reddish brown sportscoat? Thanks in advance.
    oh, lots and lots. It's a nice versatile and interesting color. Examples from I think yfyf?, Whnay, and I know PhatGuido has one he wears all the time: [​IMG] [​IMG]
    If you're going to wear brown shoes with a navy suit, just how dark should your shoes be?
    Good question... IMO I prefer a darker brown, so it's just more of an accent. As you start to go lighter it becomes more of a statement IMO, and at the point of say walnut or cognac or something, with a dark navy I think it just sticks out WAY too much. I reserve my lighter browns for light grey suits.
    I'd love some opinions on what color shirt to do with this tie. I've always worn it with lime green and want to diversify.
    Try a light yellow, like this Otherwise how about a white with blue and brown checks?
     


  5. Zaarin

    Zaarin Member

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    Business casual work allows us to wear sneakers with our black dress pants and polos for the summer. As much as black dress shoes look great, sneakers are more comfortable. Does SF have any recommendations? I have a harder time matching up a pair with black pants than with khakis. I've considered Converse, JPs, tennis shoes, adidas, Sperrys etc... but I just haven't found anything that looks "alright." I know it's a bit of an oxymoron to wear non dress shoes with a business casual look.


    So if your work allowed you to wear whatever shoe you want to work, what would you?
     


  6. cptjeff

    cptjeff Senior member

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    If your dress shoes are uncomfortable, they don't fit right.

    And looking 'right' with black dress pants and polos? The only way you're going to look respectable is to stick to a smooth leather shoe rather then a sneaker. Try a pair of penny loafers.
     


  7. click here

    click here Senior member

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    Where can I get a tweed jacket like this? Is there an online store? [​IMG]
     


  8. Guero

    Guero Senior member

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    Personally though, I'd burn that tie.


    +1,000
     


  9. Master-Classter

    Master-Classter Senior member

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    Where can I get a tweed jacket like this? Is there an online store

    I just got one almost exactly like that from Uniqlo in the winter collection for <$100. Black buttons though and normal pockets, not patch. You might have to wait until winter for tweeds to be around..
     


  10. usctrojans31

    usctrojans31 Senior member

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    Try a light brown shirt, maybe with a faint check.

    Personally though, I'd burn that tie.


    I totally accept that it's hideous, that's one of the hilarious caches behind it. I'm a diehard SC guy, as evidenced by my username, and have liked Barry Zito since he pitched for us. This tie was designed by him and was a Father's Day promotion for Oakland against the Phillies a few years ago, and I was lucky enough to grab one of the 2500 or so that were produced and have loved it ever since.

    It's actually one of my favorite, most heinous, most amazing ties. Surprisingly, it gets a lot of compliments.
     


  11. kgmessier

    kgmessier Senior member

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    I have no experience with bespoke, but I'm curious about the ballpark price ranges for various bespoke items (i.e., shirts, shoes, suits, ties, etc.). I realize actual prices may vary wildly, but I'm assuming there is a bell curve in there somewhere. Can anyone give me a sense of that?

    - Keith
     


  12. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    I have no experience with bespoke, but I'm curious about the ballpark price ranges for various bespoke items (i.e., shirts, shoes, suits, ties, etc.). I realize actual prices may vary wildly, but I'm assuming there is a bell curve in there somewhere. Can anyone give me a sense of that?

    - Keith

    Understandable question but hard to answer because there are so many variables. I will take a stab at it.

    Shirts: Perhaps the widest range of options available here. Quality of materials is perhaps less of an issue in this category because most makers can get access to good quality fabrics and the difference between a 20th-percentile cotton and an 80th-percentile cotton is a lot lower than with wools or leathers. Quality of construction is a factor but less so than with suits or shoes. Most Asian shirtmakers are in the $50-150 range. A good domestic shirtmaker (NYC, etc) is largely in the $150-350 range. The premium makers can easily range up into the four figures per shirt.

    Suits: Cost of materials and labor are significant factors here because of the effort required to make a suit. Asian tailors can sell at much lower rates because of their lower labor rates. Few would say they offer an equivalent quality product to the London or NYC tailors, but at 30-50% of their costs, the better Asian tailors are almost certainly more than 30-50% of the quality of their London/NYC counterparts. Premium fabrics can always increase the costs, but the good Asian tailors are usually in the $1300-1900 range for suits. London/NYC tailors are generally in the $3500-5000 range with plenty of options in the $5k+ range, too.

    Ties: Something of a small market here. You have niche makers such as Sam Hober ($80-100 per tie) who have homegrown businesses and offer a limited selection of custom-made ties. Some makers such as Charvet may offer custom options at some of their locations at higher costs.

    Shoes: I know the least about this subject. Obviously, different materials can affect the price dramatically. Calf leather is cheaper than shell cordovan is cheaper than alligator, etc. There are fewer in the way of low-cost options here and perhaps that is for the better as construction is quite important here. While there are a few shoemakers stateside such as Perry Ercolino, most are European with many in London. My sense of average prices is $2000-3000 for the most common shoe styles in calf leather.
     


  13. kgmessier

    kgmessier Senior member

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    ^^ This is just what I was looking for. Very informative. Thank you!
     


  14. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Senior member

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    Not a bad summary. Add in sport coats from the upper hundreds for Asia to $2000-3000 at the better US and Euro houses.


    Understandable question but hard to answer because there are so many variables. I will take a stab at it.

    Shirts: Perhaps the widest range of options available here. Quality of materials is perhaps less of an issue in this category because most makers can get access to good quality fabrics and the difference between a 20th-percentile cotton and an 80th-percentile cotton is a lot lower than with wools or leathers. Quality of construction is a factor but less so than with suits or shoes. Most Asian shirtmakers are in the $50-150 range. A good domestic shirtmaker (NYC, etc) is largely in the $150-350 range. The premium makers can easily range up into the four figures per shirt.

    Suits: Cost of materials and labor are significant factors here because of the effort required to make a suit. Asian tailors can sell at much lower rates because of their lower labor rates. Few would say they offer an equivalent quality product to the London or NYC tailors, but at 30-50% of their costs, the better Asian tailors are almost certainly more than 30-50% of the quality of their London/NYC counterparts. Premium fabrics can always increase the costs, but the good Asian tailors are usually in the $1300-1900 range for suits. London/NYC tailors are generally in the $3500-5000 range with plenty of options in the $5k+ range, too.

    Ties: Something of a small market here. You have niche makers such as Sam Hober ($80-100 per tie) who have homegrown businesses and offer a limited selection of custom-made ties. Some makers such as Charvet may offer custom options at some of their locations at higher costs.

    Shoes: I know the least about this subject. Obviously, different materials can affect the price dramatically. Calf leather is cheaper than shell cordovan is cheaper than alligator, etc. There are fewer in the way of low-cost options here and perhaps that is for the better as construction is quite important here. While there are a few shoemakers stateside such as Perry Ercolino, most are European with many in London. My sense of average prices is $2000-3000 for the most common shoe styles in calf leather.
     


  15. musicguy

    musicguy Senior member

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