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anybody go all copper? also, how many pots and pans do you really need?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by globetrotter, Dec 7, 2008.

  1. grimslade

    grimslade Senior member

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    Would mafoo have copper knives as well?

    Not to mention copper .... rings.

    Anyhoooo.... Copper pan retinning? NY Metro? Anybody? Bueller?
     


  2. Milhouse

    Milhouse Senior member

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    Would mafoo have copper knives as well?

    I mainly use bronze knives. Sharpening a stone knife can be tricky, so I suggest switching to bronze.
     


  3. philosophe

    philosophe Senior member

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    Not to mention copper .... rings.

    Anyhoooo.... Copper pan retinning? NY Metro? Anybody? Bueller?


    Did you trying calling Bridge Kitchenware? They're usually in the know.
     


  4. Tarmac

    Tarmac Senior member

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    I would never go for copper+tin, just to avoid the pickle you see grimslade in right now.

    Copper is great, expensive, heavy, and most people don't like tarnish so they have to polish them.

    I would go for a few essentials in stainless+copper if I had the dough, probably a 12" saute, saucier, saucepan, and skillet. I would probably go for Falk. I would cheap out on the large pot.

    I don't see how a single man or couple could need more than a skillet, large saute, medium saucepan, and a large stock pot/dutch.

    Also I would not throw away my cast iron skillet and small disposable teflon pan for eggs, so at least part of cooking duty is taken up by those 2 cheap items.
     


  5. freshcutgrass

    freshcutgrass Senior member

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    I'm seriously considering switching to induction in the near future (no gas available). Which leaves out all copper...at least for "cooktop" purposes.

    I think plain ole All Clad magnetic stainless/aluminum core does the job at a reasonable price (the difference in heat conduction between copper and aluminum is only marginal), and delivers excellent value for money without compromising as a high quality "tool". Plus the issue of cleaning & reactive issues aren't there. Copper is pretty, but it has shortcomings.
     


  6. grimslade

    grimslade Senior member

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    I would never go for copper+tin, just to avoid the pickle you see grimslade in right now.

    Copper is great, expensive, heavy, and most people don't like tarnish so they have to polish them.

    I would go for a few essentials in stainless+copper if I had the dough, probably a 12" saute, saucier, saucepan, and skillet. I would probably go for Falk. I would cheap out on the large pot.


    I got my copper ridiculously cheaply--less than $10 a pan, on average, for a set of five or six--3MM copper with cast iron handles, through-riveted. So I'm hardly in a position to complain.

    That said, I've read, and I don't know if it's true, that steel-clad copper attenuates the benefits of going for copper in the first place to a greater extent than tin does.
     


  7. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    what am I missing here? I'm thinking that leaves only sauciers. And griddles.
    Sauciers, saucepans, casseroles, saute pans, sauteuses. Lots of esses.
     


  8. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    That said, I've read, and I don't know if it's true, that steel-clad copper attenuates the benefits of going for copper in the first place to a greater extent than tin does.
    Sounds like bs to me. The SS is so thin in relation to the thickness of the copper. Copper is about two things, spreading the heat evenly and quick changes in heat. I don't see a very very thin layer of stainless making any difference. I WOULD accept that argument in relation to something like All-Clad Copper core, which is a very thin piece of copper sandwiched between two thicker layers of stainless. In that case, it's merely for show/marketing. If you're talking about the steel-clad mauviel or bourgeat, it's a totally different construction and the stainless is too thin to matter. All-clad (and other companies) also do the reverse. They put a super-thin layer of copper on the outside for show, and leave the rest of the pot stainless/aluminum. The copper in that case is too thin to impart any benefit.
     


  9. Renault78law

    Renault78law Senior member

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    I'm happy really happy with stainless. Though beautiful, copper tarnishes like crazy. Maintenance is enough to keep me away from it. Even the display pieces at Williams Sonoma are tarnished to high-heaven, and they're unused! They're also extradinarily heavy. Rules out one-handed use. And of course, Manton is right, there is no practical reason (aside from asthetics) for copper stockpots or roasting pans.
     


  10. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    I'm happy really happy with stainless. Though beautiful, copper tarnishes like crazy. Maintenance is enough to keep me away from it. Even the display pieces at Williams Sonoma are tarnished to high-heaven, and they're unused! They're also extradinarily heavy. Rules out one-handed use. And of course, Manton is right, there is no practical reason (aside from asthetics) for copper stockpots or roasting pans.
    you mean stainless-clad aluminum? Stainless on its own is horrible. edit: what a bunch of fruitcakes we are that we know so much about pots and pans. [​IMG] 2nd edit: and the matchy-matchy comment could be applied to most of us.
     


  11. Renault78law

    Renault78law Senior member

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    Yeah, stainless All-Clad. Requires some maintenance, but it is minimal, and I'm pretty picky. Bar keeper's friend is your, er, friend. If you want to go totally care free, go for the black anodized LTD series from All-Clad.

    Oh, and Globe, not a copper wok, right!?!?

    edit: matchy-matchy isn't a big deal for me in the kitchen. For instance, most of my Le Creuset items are different colors. I like the look. Also, cast iron is never going to match anything besides cast iron.
     


  12. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    Yeah, stainless All-Clad. Requires some maintenance, but it is minimal, and I'm pretty picky. Bar keeper's friend is your, er, friend. If you want to go totally care free, go for the black anodized LTD series from All-Clad.

    Oh, and Globe, not a copper wok, right!?!?

    edit: matchy-matchy isn't a big deal for me in the kitchen. For instance, most of my Le Creuset items are different colors. I like the look.


    I agree with Le Creuset looks good in different colors, and I really love their bright colors. For pots & pans though, I prefer that they match because I'm just anal like that. I will probably keep the AC when i get my copper though.
     


  13. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Le Creuset is, in my experience, good for sweating and braising, and that's it. Up the heat to a temp that browns, and preventing the burn is impossible. Also, rather than a fond, you get a black char crust. And everything sticks. No thanks.

    Aluminum cooking surfaces, by the way, react badly with most foods. An aluminum core is fine, but the surface should be steel. The best pans I have are either steel inside and out (All-Clad) or steel inside and copper outside (Mauviel).
     


  14. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    Le Creuset is, in my experience, good for sweating and braising, and that's it. Up the heat to a temp that browns, and preventing the burn is impossible. Also, rather than a fond, you get a black char crust. And everything sticks. No thanks.

    Aluminum cooking surfaces, by the way, react badly with most foods. An aluminum core is fine, but the surface should be steel. The best pans I have are either steel inside and out (All-Clad) or steel inside and copper outside (Mauviel).


    Agree w/regard to Le Creuset. Their use is limited but they do look nice in different colors. Just to clarify to anyoen though, All-clad stainless is a 3-layer sandwich with steel on outer surfaces and an aluminum core. That makes a big difference vs. pure steel (which is terrible). The layer of stainless if very thin. I have the AC master chef2 series which is thicker aluminum than their stainless line, and the stainless only clads the cooking surface. They don't stay shiny on the outside like the Stainless line, but you can see how thin the stainless surface actually is. It's a fraction of a mm thick.
     


  15. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Does anyone really care what the outer surfaces of their pans look like?

    OK, I mean, clean the blood off, but beyond that?
     


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