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What's the proper way to measure a pant's rise?

Threadbearer

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I'm trying to decide whether or not to take a chance on a pair of Epaulet slacks. I've heard good things about them, but the company's No Refunds policy has me spooked.

Making matters worse, I'm confused by how they describe their slacks' measurements. From their website: "Rise is measured from the lowest point of the crotch (laid flat) to the top of the waistband." But isn't rise normally measured from the crotch seam to the top of the waistband? When I lay a pair of slacks out flat, the crotch seam is quite a bit higher than the lowest point of the crotch.

Which is correct, or is there not an industry standard for it?
 

Superfluous

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I always assumed it was from the inseam cross to the top...
 

hookem12387

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Crotch seam to front wasitband top on my Epaulet's is about 10.5-11". Comfortably mid-rise. And I'm pretty sure there's a 15 day refund policy on the non-sale items?
 

David Reeves

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You measure the inseam along the inside leg. You then measure the out seam from the top of the waist band to the bottom of the trousers. Then minus the outseam measurement from the inseam and you have the rise.
 

Threadbearer

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Crotch seam to front wasitband top on my Epaulet's is about 10.5-11".

Thanks. That sounds like what I'm looking for.


Comfortably mid-rise. And I'm pretty sure there's a 15 day refund policy on the non-sale items?

Here their policy verbatim (Emphasis in the original):

14-Day Return Policy
We want you to be completely satisfied with your purchase. If you wish to return your purchase, you may do so with 14 days of receiving it. Returned items can be exchanged for other merchandise or a store credit against future purchases. Refunds are not issued under any circumstances. Returned items must be undamaged, unaltered, unworn and must include original tags and original packaging.


You measure the inseam along the inside leg. You then measure the out seam from the top of the waist band to the bottom of the trousers. Then minus the outseam measurement from the inseam and you have the rise.

Thanks, David. Why do you suppose Epaulet isn't doing it that way? Does it just make more sense for tailors to do it one way and retailers to do it another?
 

nycxandy

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Crotch seam to front wasitband top on my Epaulet's is about 10.5-11". Comfortably mid-rise. And I'm pretty sure there's a 15 day refund policy on the non-sale items?

Yeah, SF members have 15-days for returns.
 

uniesse

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Had noticed this myself. Epaulet 's measurement/ method is wrong - their trousers have nothing like the 12" rise they make a point of on their website. Of course, if you measure it their way, they do (bottom of crotch to top of waistband)

If you aren't doing it properly (inseam minus out-seam ibid), then the correct way is from the top of the waistband to the crotch seam.
 
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inlandisland

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You measure the inseam along the inside leg. You then measure the out seam from the top of the waist band to the bottom of the trousers. Then minus the inseam measurement from the outseam and you have the rise.
ftfy
 

Despos

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The most accurate is to measure the same way the crotch is measured when drafting a pattern and that is how David described it. Outseam, top of waistband to bottom of hem along the out seam. Inseam, where the front and back parts meet below the bottom of the zipper, down the inseam to the bottom hem. Subtract inseam measure from outseam measure and that is the length of rise.

If you measure from the crotch up to the waistband along the zipper or the center back seam to the top, it tells you nothing. Those two points are pitched up or down from the height at the outseam to adjust for posture and balance of the trouser and have nothing to do with the rise.
 

Threadbearer

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If you measure from the crotch up to the waistband along the zipper or the center back seam to the top, it tells you nothing. Those two points are pitched up or down from the height at the outseam to adjust for posture and balance of the trouser and have nothing to do with the rise.

So when retailers advertise their slacks as high-, medium-, and low-rise, they're glossing over the specific details in an effort just to give you an idea of where the waistband is likely to sit on your torso, right?

If that's correct, it helps me understand something weird that just happened. I'm about to return several pairs of slacks I ordered from Bonobos because they all sit very low on my hips (and compress my junk) like low-rise jeans. (That wouldn't necessarily be bad except that they're supposed to be dress slacks.) Anyway, I assumed the problem was that the Bonobos had a very low rise as measured from crotch seam to top of waist band, but when I actually took that measurement it turned out to be the same as that of my most comfortable mid-rise slacks -- about 10.5". As a result, I don't feel like I can trust stated rise measurements to help me select slacks online.

How can the Bonobos sit so much lower on my waist -- and have so much less room in the crotch -- than slacks with the same rise measurement (as measured from crotch seam to top of waistband)? Does this indicate that the back rise is shorter instead? (I can't test this hypothesis now because the pants are all boxed up and ready for return.)
 

Nicola

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So when retailers advertise their slacks as high-, medium-, and low-rise, )

1) They have no idea how you're built. What is low rise on you might be high rise on a shorter guy.

2) Those are subjective terms. If you've never seen pants that sit on a persons waist then you'll think normal rise is lower then somebody used to wearing pants at the waist.

3) Retailers are just quoting what the company tells them for the most part.
 

Despos

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]If you measure from the crotch up to the waistband along the zipper or the center back seam to the top, it tells you nothing. Those two points are pitched up or down from the height at the outseam to adjust for posture and balance of the trouser and have nothing to do with the rise.[/B]

So when retailers advertise their slacks as high-, medium-, and low-rise, they're glossing over the specific details in an effort just to give you an idea of where the waistband is likely to sit on your torso, right?

If that's correct, it helps me understand something weird that just happened. I'm about to return several pairs of slacks I ordered from Bonobos because they all sit very low on my hips (and compress my junk) like low-rise jeans. (That wouldn't necessarily be bad except that they're supposed to be dress slacks.) Anyway, I assumed the problem was that the Bonobos had a very low rise as measured from crotch seam to top of waist band, but when I actually took that measurement it turned out to be the same as that of my most comfortable mid-rise slacks -- about 10.5". As a result, I don't feel like I can trust stated rise measurements to help me select slacks online.

How can the Bonobos sit so much lower on my waist -- and have so much less room in the crotch -- than slacks with the same rise measurement (as measured from crotch seam to top of waistband)? Does this indicate that the back rise is shorter instead? (I can't test this hypothesis now because the pants are all boxed up and ready for return.)

Your question is answered in my previous response. However a trousers rise is described by a maker is relative. There is no objective norm.
 

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3) Retailers are just quoting what the company tells them for the most part.

Oops. Just realized I've been using the word retailer when I've meant to say maker. :embar: Sorry for the confusion.


However a trousers rise is described by a maker is relative. There is no objective norm.

Thanks, Chris. Up until I bought the Bonobos last week I had never purchased slacks online. Without a standard definition for rise among makers and sellers, it looks as if there's no easy way to do so with companies that don't have Bonobos' generous two-way free shipping policy. Bummer.
 

comrade

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You measure the inseam along the inside leg. You then measure the out seam from the top of the waist band to the bottom of the trousers. Then minus the outseam measurement from the inseam and you have the rise.

That's how I've been measuring it for decades. Except I would specify that the inseam measurement should be done up to the crotch seam which
is the highest point. Correct? Mr. Reeves.
 

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