Sun Protection for Life (book)

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by mensimageconsultant, May 22, 2006.

  1. mensimageconsultant

    mensimageconsultant Senior member

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    Read the book Sun Protection for Life. It will correct many misconceptions you, like most men, probably have about sun exposure. It could even save your life.

    This has been a public service announcement from...
     
  2. whoopee

    whoopee Senior member

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  3. Geowu

    Geowu Senior member

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    yeah I know that. but I don't have the patience to put sunscreen all over me everyday. there's an interesting thing about this:

    1. dark skinned people live where there is high sun exposure (tropics) and 2. light skinned people live where there is low sun exposure (far from the tropics). that's 1. to avoid skin cancer and 2. to get vitamin D from the sun in higher amounts. The exception are those indigenous people (don't remember the proper name but the popular term is eskimos), which get plenty of vitamin D from their diet and can keep a dark skin even with low sun exposure.

    therefore there is problem for dark skinned people living far from the tropics, because they won't have enough vitamin D naturally, and there is problem for light skinned people living in the tropics, because they are prone to skin cancer and their skin will get older quickly and look awful.

    so I think it would be fair to give the right for light skinned people to live far from the tropics in their natural environment in which their ancestors evolved to live optimally and for dark skinned people to live in the tropics in their natural environment in which their ancestors evolved to live optimally.

    For example, I have a very light skin and I'm stuck in a tropical country and I think that's not fair.
     
  4. stach

    stach Senior member

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    [ (don't remember the proper name but the popular term is eskimos)]

    Inuit.
     
  5. Bradford

    Bradford Current Events Moderator

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  6. mensimageconsultant

    mensimageconsultant Senior member

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    That is like the reason many men don't dress well.

    Likewise, once you have the know-how and habits, the "work" is less than expected.

    There are sunscreen sprays. Also, avoiding photosensitizing substances (like citrus) and avoiding the sun near midday lessen the need for sunscreen. Wearing long sleeves and shoes instead of sandals lessens the need. The right hat (not a baseball cap) should be worn regardless.

    Someday there might be a pill form of sunscreen.

    Now is a good time for people who won't bother to read the book to ask questions.
     
  7. kapay

    kapay Well-Known Member

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    Since we're on the subject, what kinds of sunblock are recommended? I heard we should use a sunblock that blocks UVA and UVB rays but that many brands only block one type of ray. As a young adult in college, I notice Banana Boat reigns supreme among my age group and younger teens but I'm sure there are much better products out there.

    Also since the sun affects different skin colors as Geowu mentioned. Are there products to look out for, for specific skin tones (I, for example am already a tan color naturally)?
     
  8. Arethusa

    Arethusa Senior member

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    Nearly all brands sold in the US only block UVB. Mexoryl, one of the only truly photostablized chemical blockers that protects against both UVA and UVB, is illegal in the US for.. some reason. Thank the FDA.
     
  9. Geowu

    Geowu Senior member

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    Also since the sun affects different skin colors as Geowu mentioned. Are there products to look out for, for specific skin tones (I, for example am already a tan color naturally)? you have an advantage, your skin already has some protection. you can use sunscreen for additional protection. I think taking vitamin D pills is easier than applying sunscreen.
     
  10. mensimageconsultant

    mensimageconsultant Senior member

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    Sunscreen with UVA and UVB protection of SPF 30+ is needed. Some of the better products are only available at dermatology offices. But products have improved over the years, lest anyone soured on sunscreen a while ago.

    Also, any sunscreen product can sour, lose its effectiveness. Anything older than a year should be discarded.

    There are 6 skin types (pigment types, really). Damage will damage faster, or show damage faster, on some more than others, but all should be using basically the same sunscreen. Only a few details, like allergies and whether one will be swimming or not, create needs for different types of sunscreen.

    By the way, tanning beds are not safe.
     
  11. Reggs

    Reggs Senior member

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    I need to get a new sunscreen. After using my MenScience Ti02 for about 3 weeks it started to feel heavy.

    Will sunscreen prevent freckles?
     
  12. Full Canvas

    Full Canvas Senior member

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    . . . It could even save your life.

    Then again, it might not save lives as often as marketers and manufacturers would like us to believe.

    In a topically related e-mail with a dermatologist friend of mine, I am quoting from his remarks to my inquiry about sunscreens in general.

    "Item One
    Norwegian scientists found that one of the main chemicals used in sunscreens to block the UV light, octyl-methoxycinnamate (OCM), causes death in skin cells. When cells are exposed to only 5 PPM of OMC (a much lower level than what is in most sunscreen), half of the cells die. Unfortunately, the cell death is increased when exposed to sunlight. And even worse, the chemical by-product created when OMC is exposed to sunlight is two times as toxic as OMC alone. (Radiation Protective Dosimetry, 2000; 91:283.)

    Item Two
    In recent years, it has become clear that to prevent melanoma, sunscreen must do more than block UV-B rays, it must also protect against UV-A. As a result, sunscreen makers have tinkered with their formulas, and now most claim that their products provide broad-spectrum UV-A and UV-B coverage. Sounds good, but it's actually another sleight of hand on the part of sunscreen manufacturers. Only one ingredient, avobenzone, is clearly proven to block UV-A sunlight. The FDA doesn't require its inclusion in sunscreens in order for manufacturers to claim that their products offer broad-spectrum protection. So much for regulatory protection. UV-A, the harmful, longer-wavelength UV light. UV-A penetrates right through the outer skin and through sunscreen down to the melanocytes, the cells that become cancerous in melanoma cases. In one study that proved this point, researchers at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, induced melanoma in fish by exposing them to both UV-B and UV-A sunlight. They concluded: "Sunscreens effectiveness in the UV-B region...would not protect against melanoma."

    Even if sunscreen blocked UV-A completely, almost no one uses it in the way that grants real protection against sunburn. For sunscreen to live up to its hype, you have to slop it on quite thick and reapply it every few hours. We're talking at least one full bottle per person per day at the beach. Meanwhile, the vast majority of sunscreen users apply a thin layer once or twice.

    The only proven way to prevent melanoma is to cover up. Our forebears did so in the days before sunscreen. Clearly it worked because melanoma was so rare. It's also what people now do in Australia. White Australians come largely from light-skinned British/Irish stock. Queensland province, in northeastern Australia, has the highest melanoma rate in the world, but as the SCF proudly pointed out when it rebutted Berwick's study, melanoma rates there have started to flatten. What the SCF did not mention is that while the Queensland public health authorities began a big-budget PR campaign promoting sunscreen in 1981, they shifted the campaign's focus a few years ago to strongly encourage people to cover up and stay in the shade.

    The Skin Cancer Foundation does acknowledge that sunscreen alone is not enough. You need to wear protective clothing (pricey new fabrics such as Solumbra apparently block both UV-A and UV-B, but a wide hat and long, lightweight summer clothing should suffice), and spend more time in the shade. If you're a beach lover, invest in a sun umbrella. But think twice before you slap on sunscreen. Some cement mixers destroy the roads we're told they build. Some products may contribute to the cancer we're told they prevent. "

    _______________________________________
     
  13. Arethusa

    Arethusa Senior member

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    As an addendum, do not rely on lightweight clothing to protect you. The average tshirt isn't going to give you more than 5 spf. You could buy outdoor/combat stuff designed to protect against UVA and UVB, but it is not exactly fashionable.
     
  14. kapay

    kapay Well-Known Member

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    Wow I'm sure reading all that has just made some people feel hopeless. Really the only thing you can do to be 100% safe is to avoid sunlight. Though I've heard natural sunlight actually makes people feel happier.
     
  15. Aus_MD

    Aus_MD Senior member

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    Then again, it might not save lives as often as marketers and manufacturers would like us to believe.

    In a topically related e-mail with a dermatologist friend of mine, I am quoting from his remarks to my inquiry about sunscreens in general.


    Is your friend a plagiarist as well as a dermatologist?


    "Item One
    Norwegian scientists found that one of the main chemicals used in sunscreens to block the UV light, octyl-methoxycinnamate (OCM), causes death in skin cells. When cells are exposed to only 5 PPM of OMC (a much lower level than what is in most sunscreen), half of the cells die. Unfortunately, the cell death is increased when exposed to sunlight. And even worse, the chemical by-product created when OMC is exposed to sunlight is two times as toxic as OMC alone. (Radiation Protective Dosimetry, 2000; 91:283.)

    Item Two
    In recent years, it has become clear that to prevent melanoma, sunscreen must do more than block UV-B rays, it must also protect against UV-A. As a result, sunscreen makers have tinkered with their formulas, and now most claim that their products provide broad-spectrum UV-A and UV-B coverage. Sounds good, but it's actually another sleight of hand on the part of sunscreen manufacturers. Only one ingredient, avobenzone, is clearly proven to block UV-A sunlight. The FDA doesn't require its inclusion in sunscreens in order for manufacturers to claim that their products offer broad-spectrum protection. So much for regulatory protection. UV-A, the harmful, longer-wavelength UV light. UV-A penetrates right through the outer skin and through sunscreen down to the melanocytes, the cells that become cancerous in melanoma cases. In one study that proved this point, researchers at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, induced melanoma in fish by exposing them to both UV-B and UV-A sunlight. They concluded: "Sunscreens effectiveness in the UV-B region...would not protect against melanoma."

    Even if sunscreen blocked UV-A completely, almost no one uses it in the way that grants real protection against sunburn. For sunscreen to live up to its hype, you have to slop it on quite thick and reapply it every few hours. We're talking at least one full bottle per person per day at the beach. Meanwhile, the vast majority of sunscreen users apply a thin layer once or twice.

    The only proven way to prevent melanoma is to cover up. Our forebears did so in the days before sunscreen. Clearly it worked because melanoma was so rare. It's also what people now do in Australia. White Australians come largely from light-skinned British/Irish stock. Queensland province, in northeastern Australia, has the highest melanoma rate in the world, but as the SCF proudly pointed out when it rebutted Berwick's study, melanoma rates there have started to flatten. What the SCF did not mention is that while the Queensland public health authorities began a big-budget PR campaign promoting sunscreen in 1981, they shifted the campaign's focus a few years ago to strongly encourage people to cover up and stay in the shade.

    The Skin Cancer Foundation does acknowledge that sunscreen alone is not enough. You need to wear protective clothing (pricey new fabrics such as Solumbra apparently block both UV-A and UV-B, but a wide hat and long, lightweight summer clothing should suffice), and spend more time in the shade. If you're a beach lover, invest in a sun umbrella. But think twice before you slap on sunscreen. Some cement mixers destroy the roads we're told they build. Some products may contribute to the cancer we're told they prevent. "

    _______________________________________



    Aus
     

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