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Stick shift drivers.

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by LabelKing, Oct 17, 2006.

  1. caelte

    caelte Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Mark, how the heck does that work?

    I had something similar happen - the throttle link was jammed while I was on the highway. This was an old banger (my first car, just after high school) so it was bound to break down sooner or later, I just didn't expect that to happen.

    So I had to drive while the throttle was jammed, trying to prevent the engine from over-revving and blowing up. It's not hard to do on the highway, but eventually you have to slow down. Sure enough with my luck there was a police stop checking for seatbelts at the onramp. At a stop sign. Try explaining a cop why you're revving at 6000 at a stop sign.


    Briancl is right about hearing the RPM.
    That's the key to double clutching on a crash box.
    On the MG, I started the car in gear.
    To stop,took it out of gear.
    Wouldn't work on a hill.

    The Bendix spring broke not long after.
    The TF came with a crank you put through a hole in the radiator so you could hand crank the engine . That was was fun for awhile.
    Nothing scary like the the throttle sticking.
     
  2. SGladwell

    SGladwell Senior member

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    For those who haven't learned stickshift, what would you do in the event of an emergency where for whatever reason you HAD to drive a manual? Not highly likely, but you never know.

    What about the far more likely possibility that one is travelling somewhere with more intelligent drivers and for rent cannot find some jalopy with one of those fucking torque converters wasting power and sapping economy.
     
  3. whnay.

    whnay. Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    What about the far more likely possibility that one is travelling somewhere with more intelligent drivers and for rent cannot find some jalopy with one of those fucking torque converters wasting power and sapping economy.
    So. damn. angry. all. the. time.
     
  4. romafan

    romafan Senior member

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    So. damn. angry. all. the. time.

    Hey, that could be your new sig! [​IMG]
     
  5. whnay.

    whnay. Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Hey, that could be your new sig! [​IMG]
    I don't bring the attitude to any other sub forums...
     
  6. Renault78law

    Renault78law Senior member

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    For those who haven't learned stickshift, what would you do in the event of an emergency where for whatever reason you HAD to drive a manual? Not highly likely, but you never know.

    Anyway, I learned to drive stick with a 4-speed '70 Datsun 240z. So much fun! [​IMG]

    you should probably learn to how to ride a motorcycle too. and a boat, plane, helicopter, and maybe even a submarine. you never really know...

    I learned to drive stick when I was 16 on an old porsche. BMWs, Audis and Porsches are fine, but for some reason, I was never able to transition to japanese stick shifts. I can't figure it out. Is there a big difference? Everyone says Japanese sticks are easier to drive.
     
  7. SGladwell

    SGladwell Senior member

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    I was never able to transition to japanese stick shifts. I can't figure it out. Is there a big difference? Everyone says Japanese sticks are easier to drive.

    Except for the Miata and S2000, I find Japanese sticks harder to drive smoothly than European sticks, too.
     
  8. caelte

    caelte Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I had an Audi for awhile.
    Someone riding in it asked me if it was an automatic. I said,"No."
    She was sitting right next to me and I was driving all over the hills of San Francisco.
    It was the smooothest shifter I've ever driven.
    Datsun and Honda were average.
    In fairness, the Honda was a 6 speed.
     
  9. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    A friend of mine fused his clutch to flywheel a few weeks ago at a track day on his 6 speed M3 (the hydraulic clutch fluid is actually brake fluid on that car.. how absurd).

    That's too bad about your friend's car --- hopefully they can get it fixed without too much trouble. The brake and clutch hydraulic systems on modern BMWs share the same reservoir and fluids, but I really doubt that caused his clutch to fuse to his flywheel. The brake fluid will boil first before anything gets that hot. I would also be very surprised if the clutch actually fused to the flywheel. More likely, something in the hydraulic system is messed up. Or maybe he has so much air in his brake fluid now that (due to boiling) that it can't move the clutch anymore.

    --Andre
     
  10. Dmax

    Dmax Senior member

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    [​IMG] Current ride, 6-speed manual, mine is a 2.7T . My previous ride below, still in the family, 5-speed manual (borrowed photos): [​IMG]
     
  11. briancl

    briancl Senior member

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    That's too bad about your friend's car --- hopefully they can get it fixed without too much trouble. The brake and clutch hydraulic systems on modern BMWs share the same reservoir and fluids, but I really doubt that caused his clutch to fuse to his flywheel. The brake fluid will boil first before anything gets that hot. I would also be very surprised if the clutch actually fused to the flywheel. More likely, something in the hydraulic system is messed up. Or maybe he has so much air in his brake fluid now that (due to boiling) that it can't move the clutch anymore.

    --Andre


    He already had it fixed. No more problems. Apparently he had some something wrong while out on course and caused the clutch/flywheel to heat up and cool down too quickly which eventually ended in the two being "fused" together. Now, this is all second hand, and it is possible that they were "fused" together, but really, the hydraulics were broken to the point where they were simply stuck together.

    Maybe if he had bled his brakes prior to the event like all smart people do, he wouldn't have had so many problems..
     
  12. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    OMG. He was using old brake fluid on the track with an M3? That's a recipe for disaster (because of the M3's relatively high speed, and heavy weight). Tell him to use ATE SuperBlue or Type 100 next time. I can't even imagine what his brakes must have been like at the end.

    --Andre
     
  13. briancl

    briancl Senior member

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    OMG. He was using old brake fluid on the track with an M3? That's a recipe for disaster (because of the M3's relatively high speed, and heavy weight). Tell him to use ATE SuperBlue or Type 100 next time. I can't even imagine what his brakes must have been like at the end.

    --Andre


    I use nothing but ATE SuperBlue. The stuff does wonders. People at the track in my same car will boil Motul and other synthetics, but I keep going strong. I've done back-to-back-to-back 20 minute sessions (only coming off the track to check fluids/tires) and the stuff holds strong.. no soft pedal or anything.
     
  14. Kai

    Kai Senior member

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    I use nothing but ATE SuperBlue. The stuff does wonders. People at the track in my same car will boil Motul and other synthetics, but I keep going strong. I've done back-to-back-to-back 20 minute sessions (only coming off the track to check fluids/tires) and the stuff holds strong.. no soft pedal or anything.


    I am partial to SRF myself. Never managed to boil it. Never had to bleed the brakes between sessions.
     
  15. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    SRF is great, but very expensive, and violates certain clubs' tech inspection rules of having changed brake fluid in the last 6 months, which is ironic because SRF is less hygroscopic and can last much longer than normal stuff like ATE, etc. making the 6-month rule kind of not relevant.

    ATE Type 200 (not 100 as I typed above) is like SuperBlue except it's clear and won't stain your brake lines. Some people like that because their dealership freaks out if they see stained blue reservoirs and fluids, and try to invalidate your warranty. I like to alternate the two so that when the fluid being flushed completely changes color, I know that I've changed most of the fluid.

    --Andre
     
  16. briancl

    briancl Senior member

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    SRF is great, but very expensive, and violates certain clubs' tech inspection rules of having changed brake fluid in the last 6 months, which is ironic because SRF is less hygroscopic and can last much longer than normal stuff like ATE, etc. making the 6-month rule kind of not relevant.

    ATE Type 200 (not 100 as I typed above) is like SuperBlue except it's clear and won't stain your brake lines. Some people like that because their dealership freaks out if they see stained blue reservoirs and fluids, and try to invalidate your warranty. I like to alternate the two so that when the fluid being flushed completely changes color, I know that I've changed most of the fluid.

    --Andre


    SuperBlue actually comes in an amber colored version.. perfect for alternating colors. It's hard to find, but it's out there..
     
  17. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    SuperBlue actually comes in an amber colored version.. perfect for alternating colors. It's hard to find, but it's out there..

    Yes, that's Type 200.

    --Andre
     
  18. squid

    squid New Member

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    I wish I could've seen the rpms (speed) going down the straightaways. That video was awesome!

    Another one:
    Walter Rohrl's happy feet.

    mms://a178.v096910.c9691.e.vc.akamaistream.net/7/178/9691/v0009/audi.download.akamai.com/9691/history/04_mh/07_rallye_physik_b.wmv
     
  19. ghulkhan

    ghulkhan Senior member

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    nyc
    6 speed beamer baby
     

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