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Shoe construction methods

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by alchimiste, Apr 30, 2005.

  1. RJman

    RJman Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    (A Harris @ May 05 2005,05:53) I must say that there is not much there I would wear, and there were a whole lot of hideously UGLY shoes. Anybody with me on this??
    Yes.
    Yes. Olga did have some inspirations with the scarified lines and the tattooed shoes, but much of what's being sold there is gross. Particularly violent offenders include: - the Allodi line with the big "B" shield over the laces - the writing line featuring the text of a royal decree -- about what? the price of wheat? sanitary standards for vespasiennes? - the entire Dandy Sauvage line - the patched shoes That being said, I do feel Berlutis look more refined in shape and design than many Stefanobis. And having seen Stefanobis for 400-500 euros in Paris, it's unpleasant to see Stefanobis sold for $1000. The finishing process on Berlutis is very cool, particularly in the shops where you can specify any color and any antiquing you want. However, to judge by their website they're offering a sadly limited palette as they expand. I own and love my Tibetas, durable wholecuts. I don't think I'd shop at Berluti again knowing what I know now, however. RJman
     
  2. AlanC

    AlanC Senior member

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  3. alchimiste

    alchimiste Senior member

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    It's like for big movies releases, we'll start waiting in line right now.
     
  4. alchimiste

    alchimiste Senior member

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    Is it the leather quality or the construction that is to blame?
    What would you recommend instead of Berluti?

    Mathieu
     
  5. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Weston uses a "raised" feather - it is indeed cut into the insole, but by a machine.
     
  6. alchimiste

    alchimiste Senior member

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    Another way of putting it is "what's the total cost of the shoes?".
    - A shoe which must be resoled more often (thin/soft sole) will cost more on the long run.
    - A shoe which is harder to resole due to its construction will be more expensive to resole.
    - A shoe that will be ugly/uncomfortable because of heavy creasing will last less.
    - A shoe made of cheap material will last less.

    So if you divide the total cost (purchase + resoling) by the life time of the shoes you find out that quality of construction/leather contributes a great deal to the total cost of the shoes. So in order to know if some shoes are really worth buying I need to know how much they will cost in the long run.

    Mathieu
     
  7. brescd01

    brescd01 Senior member

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    Rider (or anyone), can you describe the significance of a "hand-made" or "bench-made" shoe versus a "machine-made" one?
     
  8. RIDER

    RIDER Senior member

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    Well, in regards to a handmade shoe, or any handmade item for that matter, there is as much an appreciation for the effort and care that went into the product versus a similiar item that is machine made - there is more to the decision than just 'is it better?'. Similiar to buying an original piece of artwork rather than a print. Of course the product is 'better'; but to what extent is always debateable. Without discounting the viability of a machine-made shoe, the handmade version will be a tighter construction, with obvious characteristics of handwork in the stitching, will fit better as the time to properly last and humidify the uppers is available without the pressure of production timetables and the materials will be upgraded (linings/insoles/outsoles) as the investment allows. Generally speaking, much more care is taken - not to mention the opportunities to detail what you want without the factory restrictions that can sometimes cause compromise. I believe the overwhelming signifigance, however, is the appreciation of the 'art' of the handmade shoe...it can be worn with pride and the knowledge that an old art can be maintained due to the wearers support and encouragement. In every industry machines and robots, lasers and computers have been developed to replace human hands, and, while this has certainly been a benefit to the population as a whole, there should still be a place for true artisans to work and achieve products that are appreciated by a select few.
    Unfortunately, IMO, the marketers have made this niche virtually unreachable to anyone but the very wealthy due to the incredible price they demand...un-neccessarily so. At least that is the angle I am exploring. I know of a few talented individuals who want to carry on this tradition, and do not have the expences that would require a large loan to purchase from, and hope to offer a program shortly that will keep them busy doing what they love.
     
  9. alchimiste

    alchimiste Senior member

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    So what's the actual extra cost of hand made compared to machine made?
     
  10. alchimiste

    alchimiste Senior member

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    Who has a factory and who does not?
     
  11. silvestrosrl

    silvestrosrl Well-Known Member

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    This is the first step of the Norvegese construction. Afterwards I will insert the other steps.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. silvestrosrl

    silvestrosrl Well-Known Member

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    This is the result after the Norvegese stitching. That double stitching is made by hand from an our shoemaker. This work need 2 hours and a good ability. Now our shoemakers begin to colour the shoe, always by hand.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  13. silvestrosrl

    silvestrosrl Well-Known Member

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    Our shoemaker applies his secret finishing techniques to painting the leather (that is the result). And then with some cream, the shoes will get a particular effect of burnishing and antiquing.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. silvestrosrl

    silvestrosrl Well-Known Member

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    This is the final step. The result is something unique and extraordinary by the individual ability of our shoemakers. The burnishing and antiquing effects of our shoemaker have evoluted a lot until reaching a high level of quality.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Corniche

    Corniche Senior member

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  16. silvestrosrl

    silvestrosrl Well-Known Member

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  17. Corniche

    Corniche Senior member

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    I think so

    Thanks for your answer!
     
  18. hobbahobba

    hobbahobba Member

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    The folks at Zevin and Voyej gives a comprehensive guide on their 2nd anniversary boots edition, Make it as first Indonesian manufacturer crafting 2 different type of leather. The construction method is Italian Goodyear Welt.

    [​IMG]



    ZEVIN's cowhide plotted and cutted for each piece of the boots

    [​IMG]


    VOYEJ's american top grain

    [​IMG]


    Sewed with scrutinized detail and precision

    [​IMG]


    ZEVIN & VOYEJ brand at each tongue

    [​IMG]


    Core of construction

    [​IMG]


    Handmade's: Detail that machine can never made

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Preparation for goodyear welt stitch/ rapid stitch - neatness as resulted

    [​IMG]


    Goodyear welt stitch/rapid stitch process

    [​IMG]


    Commando rubber half sole

    [​IMG]


    Outsole finishing process

    [​IMG]


    Edge trim

    [​IMG]


    Heel part: leather + commando rubber sole

    [​IMG]


    Heel attaching to the whole processed boots

    [​IMG]


    Result

    This boots is limited to 100 pairs

    [​IMG]

    ZEVIN's full-grain pull-up cow hides - zinnwaldite color x VOYEJ's American tanned top grain - russet color
    [​IMG]


    Brogues cap-toe box

    [​IMG]


    Fancy Packaging

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    Fit pic (not my feet)

    [​IMG]
     
  19. hobbahobba

    hobbahobba Member

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