Quality mens shoes under $500

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by wmelton, Oct 26, 2014.

  1. Bill Dlwgosh

    Bill Dlwgosh Senior member

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    Oh, Yeah, I figured we were talking pre-tax prices. Have you ever ordered something from Leatherfoot that they didn't have on hand? I just wonder if there is an additional charge if they have to order something for you that they don't already have in your size. I'm in Brampton and visit the Leatherfoot site regularly but I've never actually stopped in.
     


  2. Fred G. Unn

    Fred G. Unn Senior member

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    Out of my 11 pairs of AEs, I only spent over $500 on one pair. They are pretty easy to find under $500 if you are patient as there are so many options for purchasing: Barney's sales are probably the best, but also NYC store sample sales, C&J for Paul Stuart sales, C&J for RL sales, C&J for RL clearance at DSW or C21 (rare, but happens), Yoox (really rare, but I got a pair of handgrades for under $400), C&J for BB Peal during one of their 30% corporate sales or from BB outlet flippers on eBay, sales from UK retailers like Edwards of Manchester, Robert Old or Pediwear, etc. Also, they aren't benchgrade quality but C&J for Shipton and Heneage at $385 is a pretty good deal as well. Sign up for their discount club (or something like that) to get a $50 off coupon so their C&Js are $335. They are also very forthcoming about last and manufacturer if you email them. Not benchgrade quality, but a good value at that price IMO.
     


  3. NWTeal

    NWTeal Senior member

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    Last I checked, Skoaktiebolaget has Carminas for around $380 USD right now. Plus shipping and duties (They use USPS so I hear that is rare) you're looking at around $410~425 depending on the US Dollar. Typically it's more expensive but the dollar is pretty strong right now. Right now Carminas are pretty much the same price as a full price AE after taxes.

    Gentlemen's footwear also carries Loake 1880 made herring shoes for around $295 which are free shipping to the US.
     


  4. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Senior member

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    Big +1

    Under $500, you can't beat Carminas from Skaok:
    http://www.skoaktiebolaget.se/collections/carmina
     


  5. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    There really are quite a few brands of good to very good quality shoes that are available for under $500, but as a few of the regulars on here have stated, the fit is going to be a big factor. It doesn't matter how good a shoe is if the last doesn't fit your foot shape.

    The next part is between the entry level of good shoes or the close to $500 shoes. the difference is mainly the last shapes and attention to details like finer stitching and nicer polish jobs on the leathers before getting the pair.

    You also have to think about where the shoe is shipping from and where you are living. Allen Edmonds ($250-400) is a great option for people in the US just going into quality shoes because they have all the needed qualities for a good shoe with reasonable prices, especially if on sale or from the Shoebank ($130-300) for factory seconds (slight cosmetic imperfections). They have a ton of different last shapes an a huge variety of sizes to accommodate just about everyone.

    Alden is a very sturdy shoe that many people love for causal shoes and boots, but they are generally above $500 now. I love them and they make a huge variety of sizes and widths, but are difficult to find besides online since there are very few retailers who carry them. They are bulky to many people but very comfortable and can last decades if taken care of.

    Another factor is how sturdy and hardy of a shoe you want. AE and Alden are big shoes that can last a long time and really take a beating. There are some great Blake stitched shoes out there to look more elegant if you don't mind the compromise on durability. I'm not a big fan of the styles but Mezlan and Magnanni are made in Spain in mainly Blake stitch constructions but are still an entry to higher quality shoes and can be bought for big sales (usually $250-350). I have seen them for $100 for certain styles in Nordstrom.




    Here are some extra notes on a few brands of shoes that I was able to get my hands on to try out in my size range. There are limited brands, but I hope that they help:

    If you want a nice pair of shoes that are designed by an American who also writes a major mens fashion blog (The Fine Young Gentleman), here is a great way to get good shoes at a great price by Jay Butler. They are made in Mexico, where nicer shoes have been made for an extremely long period of time. He only has loafers being made at the moment ($145 range), but they are a very light and sturdy Blake construction. The insole has a very nice cushion under the leather and it is thicker in the arch to give a nice arch support instead of the normal flat insole for loafers: (sorry for any poor quality pictures throughout the post, but I took them quickly with my iPhone.)

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    If you are into more european shoes made in Goodyear welt construction, Shoepassion.com is another source. They are designed in Germany and made in Spain. They have a huge variety of styles and sizes. They are very durable but have a feel much more like Crockett and Jones of England (usually more than $500 from the US) but these shoes are more in the $200-300 range. They are nice people who run the company and the shoes are quite good for the price. I consult and review shoes for various shoe companies around the world and here are some pictures of a pair that they sent me to evaluate for them. I made some recommendations of things to work on (as I do to all companies I help out), but I think that they are worth considering as an entry pair if you find a style that you like or as a reasonably priced extra pair depending on your financial situation:

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    You just need to speak to them about sizing because they have a variety of lasts and sizes are not the same as US either. I'm a US 14 or so and I got a 12.5 in this model on this last since this one runs so long and is in UK sizing. They also come with a pair of rubber sole covers that can be applied, extra laces, and shoe bags. The leather insole has a bit of a cushion under it as well.




    Another great option is Scarosso. They are another German company but they produce shoes in Italy. They offer a large variety of sizing as well as styles in ready to wear (RTW). They also offer a full Made To Order (MTO) service that is online. They have a variety of styles here and let you choose details to change as well as leather type, color, sole type/color, lining, etc. They have an even larger variety of sizing with MTO than RTW. Here is a pair that I designed as something different for them to send to me. I wanted to try their online MTO process as well as evaluate their shoes. The RTW shoes are in the mid $200 range and the MTO are in the low to mid $300 range depending on details that you choose. Their shoes are Blake stitch but you can also request Blake Rapid in the MTO, which is what I did, since I like a more substantial construction. I ordered a deerskin chelsea boot with a leather sole in Blake rapid construction:

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    They also have their own sizing system that is not US or UK sizing. It is a modified european. This is a 48 but according to them is a US 15 which is normally a 49.5 or 50 depending on the brand for me. These also came with a nice shoe bag and a shoe horn. The insole is very smooth leather and there is a small heel cushion under the half sock liner.




    For a little bit more ($350) Awl and Sundry is a company based out of New York City that makes hand welted shoes that you can design to an even higher level of detail right from your computer. These are not goodyear welted, but really by constructing the main parts of the shoe by hand. I discussed this at length with the owner to make sure that this term was not being used incorrectly.
    The brand has multiple last shapes that you can choose from as well as many basic styles of shoes to modify. You can even add in multi tone of different leathers, suede, grain leather, etc. You even can choose the stitching color for the leather upper. This price also comes with a nice pair of wooden shoe trees, shoe horn, and a pair of shoe bags.
    The soles are only available in a reddish burgundy at this time instead of more traditional browns or black, but they are very nice and do stand out a bit. They are a very solid constructed shoe, even more than Shoepassion or Scarosso, but have a different type of aesthetic from them as well. They are getting close to the solid feel of Alden but are not as bulky as Alden by any means. They have a wide variety of sizes available as well and are working on even carrying widths right now.
    I wanted to try a pair of double monks but in the spectator style with both leather and suede:

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    As you can see, I really controlled a lot of the details of the leather vs suede combinations and wanted it to be asymmetrical. This is also another brand that you should ask about sizing advice just to make sure. They are in US sizing but your size in these may not be the same as normal. I went down here too. The insole on these is a leather covered foam cushion, so they are very comfortable after a much shorter time than most welted shoes.




    I know that there are quite a few other newer brands who are giving great shoes for the price and here are just a few:
    J Fitzpatrick (by Justin "The Shoe Snob) Fitzpatrick) $400-450

    Meerman (good entry level that offer multiple quality levels) $175-250 for regular line and $290 - 350 for hand welted.

    Carmina (top notch service and great quality goodyear welted shoes that rival great British shoe brands like Crockett and Jones) $350-600 depending on where you get them. I recommend Skoaktiebolaget in Sweden who has phenomenal staff and service plus the lowest prices that I have seen for Carmina.

    Jack Erwin (designed in the USA and made in Portugal of either Blake or Goodyear construction depending on the line) $200

    Paul Evans (designed in NYC and made in Italy by Blake construction) $350-400

    Cobbler Union (designed in the USA and made in Spain by Goodyear construction but with higher finishing details like beveled waist, quilted leather insole, etc.) ($400-500)





    I know that this isn't everything (didn't include any of the many new French shoe brands due to lack of availability in many areas), but I hope that this is a great start to help you new guys out as well as for many guys who want to try something different without completely breaking the bank. For some of you guys on the high end of shoes, it could be worth trying one or two of these out for casual shoes or to take a shot at designing something new. You EG, GG, Lobb, etc. guys could even get a pair to just beat up for poor weather, heavy walking, etc.

    Feel free to add things to this and to ask questions or even cross-post this to some other threads to help it be more seen. You have my permission!
     


  6. wmelton

    wmelton Member

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    Really great input! Thank you. Recently bought some magnannis for dress casual wear and really love them. Looking at a pair of C&Js or Carmina's for business wear
     


  7. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    Glad to help out. Check out some if the other styles from some of these newer brands too. You may like them in some of their more classic styles so you don't have quite as much of an increase in cost before moving up. If you want carmina, contact skoaktiebolaget and they can help you out. I deal with them a lot and they are very knowledgable plus have great prices.
     


  8. TOstyle

    TOstyle Senior member

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    A fantastic post, a great read thanks @mw313 . If we could like posts or something on here, I'd do that (and I never do that). A follow-up.
    Quote:
    I've been wondering about Scarosso but haven't heard anything from anyone who's bought here in the U.S. Where do you think they rank relative to the other, more popular names (Carmina, Ed Jones, Allen Edmonds, Alden in particular). At the very least, them seem like a good value. And I likes me some good value. MTO in the $300 sounds like a god damn steal (Leffot is waaaay above this).
     


  9. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    Thanks @TOstyle !

    They are of quite good quality, especially for the price. It is tough to completely compare them to Carmina, AE, Alden, etc. because they are not Goodyear welted like the others mentioned. I asked for a pair in Blake Rapid so it is sturdier than the normal blake and is closer to a Goodyear in feel, except that it has an actual mid-sole of leather instead of the cork under the insole used in the goodyear shoes. This adds weight and volume to the feel of the shoe but it still is lighter than AE and Alden. I think that a dress Carmina is quite light in feel so I would put it closest to them in feel. The lines and stitching are very consistent and clean on my pair which makes me put it above AE and more like Carmina. I didn't get normal calf leather so I don't know how the final finishing/polishing of the leather would be to compare to them because my pair is in deerskin. I have to say that it does have a nice polish even for the deerskin and it is a nice piece of leather.

    I don't think that they would give more attention to my pair's production, even though they knew that I would be reviewing it. I asked for them to be like any normal order because I wanted to be able to give them real critiques to improve their shoes further.

    So long answer short, I would say above AE in all major aspects, better finishing and consistency as well sleekness than standard Alden (but not as "substantial" either), and most on the level of Carmina.

    I think that they are worth trying out, especially for the price with MTO. You also can talk to them if you need a special width or questions about sizing.

    Hope that helps and please feel free to ask more questions if desired!
     


  10. vmss

    vmss Senior member

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    How do they compare to magnanni? I think its a fair comparison since both have Blake stitch.
     


  11. TOstyle

    TOstyle Senior member

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    Thanks again. @mw313 . Will absolutely given them a try. Hopefully there aren't any custom duties getting into into NYC.

    One technical question - do you put any particular stock into being Goodyear as opposed to Blake welted? I get the differences generally, but as a shoe guy who knows what he's talking about, do you think it makes a real difference?

    One leather question - I'm not too familiar with deerskin. How does this compare/ perform as opposed to plain old cow leather?

    Can I ask a more general question of what you do? Do you have a blog or something, since it sounds like you got these shoes for the purposes of writing a review? I like your style and analysis, so would be up for following it if you produce content.

    Sorry for all the questions! I'm a curious chap...
     


  12. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    superior to magnanni. The leather feels better too!

    I have held and even worn many pairs of magnanni, and none have felt close to these. Magnanni shoes are not bad at all, but they are just overpriced unless you can get a good discount from nordstrom rack, nordstrom clearance, etc. The Scarosso feel superior in every way, except for the applied patina that some of the magnanni pairs have added to add another level of dimension to the shoes. I haven't seen any of those pairs in person but have in pictures, so I can't comment if this applied patina is any good or not to the feel.
     


  13. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    No problem @TOstyle ! Thank you for the questions! I don't think they would hit you with duties, because I live right outside Philadelphia (New Jersey side) and didn't get hit. My guess is that the value is stated low enough that they don't go through the trouble of seeking it out. Maybe it was just luck, but my thought is that they only hit the really high priced stuff.

    I personally prefer the feel of goodyear, but I think what is more important is the overall quality of the shoe itself.

    Here is a brief overview with some of the important points to think about as a consumer:

    Blake Stitch (also known as McKay stitch) is where they attach the leather upper directly to the insole and outsole so it is generally closer cut and thinner than other constructions. It is the "standard" of many Italian shoe brands. It is lightweight, but depending if the maker places an extra insole over the standard leather insole, you can see the stitching from the inside of the shoe. Some people can feel this and don't like the feeling. I haven't heard too many people complain about this because the socks will help cover this up and some brands also apply an extra leather or cushioned insole on top, so you won't even know that it is there. The main concern or possible problem is that since the stitch comes into the shoe, if you step in water, it could technically wick itself into your shoe and touch your foot. That wouldn't happen immediately but is possible. I don't have problems with any of the usually discussed problems that i have mentioned above. My problem is that since they are so thin under the foot, I feel everything that I walk on and prefer more cushion in my step that I can get with other construction methods. I have a very thin foot with very little fat, so I need the cushion. Many people probably don't have this problem.

    Blake Rapid has a mid-sole (usually leather) under and attached too the upper/insole stitching. The midsole comes out on all sides of the insole, so another stitch is used to attach the outside edges of the midsole to the outsole. This makes the shoe slightly more bulky on the edges as well as thicker in the sole, but by using two separate stitches, it basically prevents the water wicking through. These are usually seen as the "happy medium" between Blake and goodyear, because they don't have the water wicking problem from blake but usually aren't as bulky on the edges as Goodyear. They do still have a set of stitching that you can feel inside if it isn't covered. My Scarosso pair does have the stitching visible, but it does not bother me at all. This is usually considered an upgrade in many of the nicer Italian shoe makers.

    Goodyear is the standard of high quality RTW/MTO shoes from the US and UK. This is on offer from some of the top Italian shoe brands as the top line as well, if this helps you at all. It has the upper attached to the insole and a welt, which is a strip of leather to keep the parts together. Some makers sew these parts directly together and some use what is called gemming.

    (Gemming is where there is a material like canvas used between the welt and the upper/insole. You can read up on the arguments about this in a few different threads on SF, but the main difference in that the canvas gemming can rot over many years, which would cause a problem in resoling the shoe at that point. Some makers that use gemming will offer a refurbishing or recraft instead of a standard resoling, and then they would replace the gemming if it is rotted. I have seen pictures of a rotted gemming, but I don't expect it to be a problem in the lifetime of a shoe for most people.)

    After that step of upper, insole, welt (gemming if used) are stitched together, then there is a cork/glue layer that is "spread" into the open area between the welt. This adds another layer of insulation and cushion, but it also gives out in area of more pressure overtime, so a custom footbed is formed. Then the outsole is stitched onto the welt. By doing it this way, resoling is very easy because the cobbler or maker only need to remove the outsole and restitch a new sole to the welt. This construction also keeps water out better by having a separate stitch that connects the sole to the shoe. The inner stitching from the first step also does not go inside of the shoe (it is attached under the insole) so the wearer will not see or feel stitching where their foot is. This shoe is more "bulky" than the others from most makers, but it does have a sturdier feel with more cushioning. I personally prefer the feel of the cushioning and added protection under the foot. The problem that some people have is that it takes longer to "work in" the shoe because of the thicker shoe and the cork that has to mold to the foot, but once "worked in" they feel much more comfortable.

    There also is a Hand welted construction, which is very similar to Goodyear, except that NO gemming is used, and it takes much more time to do. The advantage is that a trained person can make a hand welted shoe more sleek than goodyear (they can rival some of the thinner constructions like some blake) because they can stitch closer to the upper than a machine can go without getting caught on the leather and damaging it. They also can possibly have more stitches per square inch (SPI), which is a way to show "quality" or artistry to shoe snobs who care about these things, like myself. I think it shows who the masters are, but it really has no functional benefit with the tighter stitching, because the sole should wear out before worrying about the stitches breaking. Most hand welted shoes are extremely expensive and usually are bespoke only. (Awl and Sundry does sell hand welted shoes for only $350 as MTO shoes and you can customize a lot. I really recommend giving them a try, especially if you want to try out a totally out there shoe or for something casual. They don't put in the heavy finishing of the uppers for polishing, but you can do that yourself if you care about those things.)

    There are other construction types, but most are just for showing off technical ability of the bespoke shoe makers. Some do have a purpose, like being almost water locked and there are variations with the same general purpose, but with different names and looks. Norvegese, Norwegian welt (not to be confused with Norwegian Split toe by Alden), Goyser, Bentivegna, etc. are a few if you are interested in looking into them. I won't go into detail of them right now.




    To you question on leather, the deerskin is extremely supple and is also very strong. It has a very heavy grain to it and feels thicker overall, but it is more difficult to get a good polish on it. I wanted a casual and interesting looking boot, so that is why I asked to try the deerskin. I usually use calf skin for shoes unless I want to work with something exotic or alternatives like suede or shell cordovan / crup. Most good shoes use calf skin as the normal leather, because it is durable and takes a shine well. The calf has less imperfections seen because they are younger animals and the skin is tighter still. Cow hide isn't used as much because there are more imperfections seen due to aging of the cow and injuries that the animal sustains over the longer life. They usually are used in casual shoes like working style boots and many have grains that are seen.



    In terms of what I do: I am finishing medical school (a "student doctor" who sees patients under supervision of the attending physician) and specializing in both foot / ankle surgery and podiatry, with subspecialty focus in orthopedics and wound care. For those specialties and even more so for the subspecialties, footwear is very important. I actually helped found an organization on teaching about footwear, insoles/orthotics, and biomechanics (how someone walks, runs, etc. and the associated problems that occur with certain body types or orthopedic injuries sustained over life). In doing both of these things, I started to get very interested in the technical aspects of shoe construction, last development, and material selection for all parts of the footwear. I have had a love of shoes since I was a child, so this was the next step for me.
    After working on improving my knowledge through much reading and learning from many experts in their parts of the shoe industry, I started doing reviews and eventually consulting for various shoe companies around the world who want to learn how to improve their products. Some want to know about the technical stuff like construction, fit/finish, last development/modification, or materials. Some of the companies are more interested in the medical side of shoes and how to make them more friendly towards people with medical disorders affecting the feet or getting insurance coverage. There are even some companies that just want a very detailed review of a pair of shoes by someone with knowledge in all of the above topics so they can work on certain details before opening them up to the general public.

    Whenever I write a review I tell them exactly what I think with no concern of hurting feelings because that is how they will improve their products. I do the same when I post my thoughts on StyleForum for members to read. I don't get any compensation when more people buy shoes after reading my shoes, so it doesn't matter to me if anyone mentions that they heard about the company from me. Of course you can mention me and they may help you out, but I can't guarantee anything on that part. I don't let a free pair of shoes bias me in anyway and even though I get many free pairs (mainly shoes but sometimes even sneakers) sent to me on a normal basis (either for general review or when consulting for a company), I still buy my own pairs of shoes when I want to just get some interesting style or to learn more about a different type of shoe. I can't learn more myself if I am not willing to learn from other shoe makers around the world. At this point, the shoes that I actually do buy are the top of the top (in both quality and small production numbers but with pricing to match), but they are the ones who are trying out new things before those techniques spread out to other more mainstream companies around the world.

    I have thought about doing a blog, but have never done one, due to time. I have some friends and acquaintances who do (Justin "The shoe snob" fitzpatrick, Justin "The Fine Young Gentleman" Jeffers, etc. but since they have them already, I figured that I can do more work with trying to improve the industry with that time. If there were enough people who would want me to do a blog on the more technical as well as medical side of shoes (plus many beautiful shoe pictures), I would definitely consider it.

    I hope that helps!
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2015


  14. vmss

    vmss Senior member

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    Thank you very much for your detailed explanation.

    Which brand would you recommend for Goodyear footwear quality/price ratio?

    Carmina seems to be well respected on this forum, however, Edward green and g&g are two-three times more expensive. What is the difference in the price compared to Carmina?

    Which brands would you recommend in blake/blake rapid shoes?
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2015


  15. mw313

    mw313 Senior member

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    The recommendation all depends on where you live because some brands are great for quality/price ratio but are much more money in certain countries than others. Normally I would say Carmina or Crockett & Jones for traditional Goodyear welted shoes.

    If you are in the US and don't mind a minor cosmetic imperfection, I would try Allen Edmonds if purchased from the ShoeBank. They sell factory 2nds, which are normal fitting shoes that have slight cosmetic imperfections. Some are so minor you won't even be able to find a problem. They can run for as low as $100-200 and have a huge variety of sizes, widths, and lasts to fit a variety of foot shapes. The shoes are not the most elegant, but they are sturdy shoes with a huge variety of options around. They are my recommended Goodyear welted shoe for people in the US who are new to quality shoes.

    C&J is much more expensive if you live in the US ($700+ from the official store in NYC), unless you order from Pediwear in the UK, which is in the $500 range if I remember correctly.

    Carmina is the best price at Skoaktiebolaget (around $350-400) and as far as I know, they ship anywhere. You can ask @Leaves on that part, since it is his store.

    If you want to have plenty of MTO options but don't mind doing your own polishing (the shoes are finished in flat colors but can easily be polished to your liking), then I would consider Awl and Sundry. ($350) They are technically hand welted and the lasts aren't quite as elegant as I would like, but they are a great bargain for a very good quality and still have a variety of lasts based on what shape you would like for the toe as well as different lasts for different foot shapes.

    If you want hand welted shoes, then Enzo Bonafe (Italy) without hesitation! They are in the range of $500 from Skoaktiebolaget.



    Yes Edward Green and Gaziano & Girling are superior shoes, but they substantially more money. I suggest working your way up to them to really be able to appreciate the differences. You are paying for the last shapes (more elegant and actually like how a foot is shaped unlike many more bulbous lasts made to fit a variety of foot shapes), how they hug your foot from the tighter waist, the close cut welts, and some small details. They have more beveled waists (EG) or even fiddle-back waists (GG), the materials are the highest quality that you can buy, the soles are to another level, and the stitching is finer and tighter than just about anything else you will find outside of bespoke. They both also have burnished or antiqued toes to really help the shades develop another level of complexity. All of these changes are small, except for the fitting characteristics (they make a big difference depending on your foot shape), but they come together to make more of a difference than you would expect until you see them in person. I personally love and wear both EG and GG, but I worked my way up to them so I really could appreciate the fine details, and my foot is narrow and shapely so the lasts fit my foot much better.



    For Blake/Blake Rapid shoes I recommend Jay Butler for inexpensive loafers (about $145), which do very well in Blake construction in the first place.

    For dressier shoes, I like Scarosso (who makes both Blake and Blake rapid) because they have both ready to wear (RTW) and Made to order (MTO). The price point of mid-$200 for RTW and low to mid-$300 for MTO is very reasonable price and made in Italy.

    If you are willing to search around for a retailer and pay a little more, Gravati of Italy is a great choice. They have a great variety of sizes and lasts. They have a nice MTO program and are very comfortable. They have a variety of outsoles too.

    If you don't mind a lower quality but can find a great clearance price, Magnanni isn't a bad choice. As I have said before, I'm not a big fan of the styles, but the build quality isn't bad if you can get them for a clearance price of $100-150. I wouldn't pay more than that though.

    Those are the quality/price ratio shoes for Blake/Blake rapid, but if you are looking for the closest to the EG/GG level of the Blake/Blake rapid world, I would consider Scarpe Di Bianco. They are substantially more money (probably around $800-900 depending on where you look and what model/materials you choose) but are some of the best that I have seen in these construction methods. They make both Blake and Blake Rapid, but they even make Goodyear and Norvegese if desired. I don't own any, but I have handled quite a few pairs to analyze. They have a great level of finishing and nice looking lasts too.

    Another high level maker of Blake or Blake Rapid shoes is Bontoni. They are in the $1000 range, but if you like extreme antiquing, they make great shoes and have a huge variety of styles. Some styles are ones that you probably wouldn't see outside of the bespoke world. They also are willing to make other construction methods if desired and can even make you a custom last for a premium.

    Just so you know, Enzo Bonafe also can make Blake shoes. They don't advertise them that much, because they are know for the hand welted shoes (great bargain for quality), but they do offer blake. I just don't know what the price would be for their blake line.




    I hope that this helps a bit and let me know if you need any other names after looking at some of the styles of these brands. There are many brands of good or even high quality of all of the construction methods, but the prices do vary greatly. Some are extremely overpriced, some on spot on, but some are really bargains for quality. I tried to list the bargains as well as what you get for the higher prices of each range.
     


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