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What are your 10 favorite cities in the world?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by drizzt3117, Nov 24, 2004.

  1. ernest

    ernest Well-Known Member

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    You told me that the choice was wide and food good. So finding cheese and wine is completely normal. In the best 10 cities for food, you can at least found these products as they are the most basic ones.

    All products are imported in Japan so they are expensive. How much a kilogramme of apple? A yaourt? A banana?


    A western, tourist can not eat sushi and rice 3 times per day and think that the food is good and the choise wide.

    Talk me about japanese food. What do they can in the morning most of time?
     
  2. ernest

    ernest Well-Known Member

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    Writing and speaking are 2 very different things and japanese are very much harder to be understood than euroepean, you can not deny this fact.

    How do you know she had no guide book about culture? She tried to talk to people in shops, in the street and in restaurants and NOBODY was speaking correct English.... What would a book change to this fact?

    Tokyo is a great city it is sure but not among the 10 favorite for people of this forum. Are they all so silly so ignore Tokyo?

    Why are you the first authority ?

    I guess this is a city you like to see but not to go back the next holidays...
     
  3. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    It could be that less people have been to Tokyo than to cities in Europe, it's difficult to call a city one of your favorite if you haven't been there.

    I've spent a lot of time in Tokyo and while I would agree with ernest that it's a more difficult city for most caucasians and europeans to explore than a city like Paris because of the language issues, it's no more diffcult to explore than a city like Budapest (which has a far lower percentage of English speakers than Tokyo, and whose language is absolutely incomprehensible if you don't speak it, some words in Japanese [quite a few in fact] have western or english origins and you'll be able to understand them, while Hungarian has almost no similarity with almost any languages [5% similarity to Finnish or Basque]) adjusted for size (as it's much larger than budapest) and while it's not as heterogeneous as European capitols, that's not necessarily a bad thing IMO. There is an amazing breadth of goods and services available. I think if everyone here had visited Tokyo it would be on their top 10 list.

    Comparing Paris to Vienna is rather interesting, I wouldn't say there were more gypsies in Vienna, although there certainly were some, I think Vienna is a more orderly city in general though, people are VERY law-abiding in general. I had people cluck at me disapprovingly for walking across the street against a light and you get a big dose of bitte recht stehen if you aren't moving rapidly on the left side of an escalator. I don't see the same sense of order in Paris.
     
  4. ernest

    ernest Well-Known Member

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    Isn't is the same thing?

    Usually, when you like a city, you would like to live in it.

    You told us that people had forgotten Tokyo and gave us some arguments to put it in the list.

    I replied to some of your arguments, food for exemple = Tokyo is definitly not in the 10 best cities for food.

    Aren't these cities more attractive regarding foods?

    Paris
    London
    Roma, Milano, Napoli, Florencia...
    Sidney
    NYC
    LA
    Las Vegas
    LOS ANGELES
    Boston
    Hong kong
    Taiwan
    Bruxels
    Berlin
    Marseille
    Lyon

    ?????
     
  5. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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  6. ernest

    ernest Well-Known Member

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    (ernest @ Feb. 23 2005,09:19)
    Well Ernest, the topic of this thread isn't "What cities would you like to live in" it's "What are you ten favorite cities in the world"
    Isn't is the same thing? Usually, when you like a city, you would like to live in it. You told us that people had forgotten Tokyo and gave us some arguments to put it in the list. I replied to some of your arguments, food for exemple = Tokyo is definitly not in the 10 best cities for food. Aren't these cities more attractive regarding foods? Paris London Roma, Milano, Napoli, Florencia... Sidney NYC LA Las Vegas LOS ANGELES Boston Hong kong Taiwan Bruxels Berlin Marseille Lyon ?????
    I would rank Tokyo behind only Paris, London, New York, and perhaps Lyon for food, although I am a bit biased against Lyonnaise cuisine, many French (or others) may rate it ahead of Paris, and I have dined at most of the best restaurants in all of these cities. Also, wanting to live in a city and it being your favorite is not the same thing. Â I like New York but I wouldn't want to live there, no offense to the New Yorkers on this board.
    Just one detail = food is not only restaurants but what you can buy in shops ...
     
  7. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    Japan is not lacking for premium foods of any type, it is more expensive, but they have things flown in from all over the world.
     
  8. ernest

    ernest Well-Known Member

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    Saying that people in Budapest speaks less English that people from Tokyo is not serious. They speak also French & German well.

    At least the letters are latin, so you can read.

    Gypsies don't care about the law more in Vienna than in Paris.
     
  9. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member

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    Please keep the racism off the forum. It's distasteful.
     
  10. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    (Tokyo Slim @ Feb. 23 2005,07:25) Well Ernest, the topic of this thread isn't "What cities would you like to live in" it's "What are you ten favorite cities in the world"
    Isn't is the same thing? Usually, when you like a city, you would like to live in it. You told us that people had forgotten Tokyo and gave us some arguments to put it in the list. I replied to some of your arguments, food for exemple = Tokyo is definitly not in the 10 best cities for food. Aren't these cities more attractive regarding foods? Paris London Roma, Milano, Napoli, Florencia... Sidney NYC LA Las Vegas LOS ANGELES Boston Hong kong Taiwan Bruxels Berlin Marseille Lyon ?????
    I am not sure I would put boston, london or berlin ahead of tokyo for food. E, your list is very Euro heavy food wise. London has some great food, ditto Berlin, but I am not sure if I would consider them world class food cities. Granted, you might have to apprectiate japanese food to consider Tokyo a great food city (I am sorry, I would have a problem calling a city a great food city based entirly on imported cuisines), but for people who love sushi or ramen or any number of other japanese dishes Tokyo can be heaven.
     
  11. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    Yes you can read the signs but what significance does Nepszinhaz utca have to most people who don't speak Hungarian?

    I estimate about 5-10% of the people in Budapest actually speak English, I think the total in Tokyo is probably closer to 50%, and at least 25%. Anyone under the age of 30 should speak English fairly well, I have quite a few employees that emigrated here to take jobs directly from Tokyo and hadn't been outside of the US, their English is not too hard to understand. Older Hungarians may speak French or German, the younger ones are more likely to speak Slavic languages (mostly Russian) Remember, under the 40 years of Soviet rule, they didn't teach much French or German in Hungary.
     
  12. Fabienne

    Fabienne Well-Known Member

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    Really?

    They taught German in Polish school during the same period of history. You had to be able to communicate with the brothers in the Democratic Republic... I talked in German with my cousins in Poland when I visited. It was the one language we all had in common.
     
  13. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    (drizzt3117 @ Feb. 23 2005,13:01) Remember, under the 40 years of Soviet rule, they didn't teach much French or German in Hungary.
    Really? They taught German in Polish school during the same period of history. Â You had to be able to communicate with the brothers in the Democratic Republic... Â I talked in German with my cousins in Poland when I visited. It was the one language we all had in common.
    although I find german is becoming less common in central europe and the balkans. 15 years ago it was lingua franca in a lot of that area, now you don't find young people who speak it.
     
  14. bryce330

    bryce330 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, at least France doesn't have any problems with anti-semitism. [​IMG] The only prejudice/racism I have ever heard from Japanese people is against the Chinese, and even that has been very limited.
     
  15. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    (ernest @ Feb. 22 2005,20:28) Japanese are one of the most racist people. Exemple = they have no jews and many of them declare not no like jews...
    Yeah, at least France doesn't have any problems with anti-semitism. [​IMG] The only prejudice/racism I have ever heard from Japanese people is against the Chinese, and even that has been very limited.
    sorry, bryce, japanese can be very..... lets say.... insular. I don't think this is a good reason to insult japan, but there is a huge amount of ..... insularism in japan. but I think that americans really don't expect to see racism in other parts of the world, as strong as it is.
     
  16. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    This is true, however, most of my Hungarian friends have mentioned that they learned primarily Russian in school, with Hungarian still being the primary language that they listened to.
     
  17. oscarthewild

    oscarthewild Well-Known Member

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    1. Istanbul mix of the east and west. Seat of THREE empires: Byzantine, Constantine and Ottoman.

    Amazing food, cheap and not too sanitized for tourists.

    2. Cities on the old silk route and cities off this route in northern China. Once again a mix, this time of chinese and Turkish cultures. Turkish spoken but unlike Turkey and Turkemanistan etc, still written in arabic script. Amaxzing coloured mosaic domes next to stark commie blandness.

    more to come
     
  18. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Well-Known Member

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    I'm not going to even comment on the racism (or insularity) of the Japanese people. I've seen, or been the victim of, the same thing in my own country. As have many black people or mexicans in the US, or Gypsies in Europe, or whatever. The only thing I can really think of that a westerner would be excluded from in Tokyo (because he's white) would be SOME of the "Gentleman's clubs". Since that isn't usually a problem for me - I automatically discount that as an issue.

    Perhaps its a different situation for some of you, but I don't intend to spend much of my time in foriegn cities inside nudie bars.

    As far as being able to read the signs in Tokyo - I've never had a problem with it. Many things are written in English. Almost all of the street signs in Tokyo are perfectly legible. Outside the major metro areas sometimes there is a problem with that, but in Tokyo I've never had a problem. There is an English subway map right next to, or around the corner from the Kanji one. And any decent guide book will have one in it anyways.

    Lets see - I distincly remember drizzt saying that he spent $3000 or so on dinner in LAS VEGAS. Yeah, you can spend that on dinner in Tokyo too. Or you can spend $10 on dinner in Tokyo. You can buy just about anything in shops in Tokyo that you can buy in the U.S. I don't see the problem. Knowing Tokyo, I'm sure there is a shop somewhere dedicated ONLY to the thousands or so varieties of goat cheese, and the whole price range and quality scale that goes with it. It would probably make your mouth water.

    Ernest, your assertion that ALL products in Japan are imported, thus expensive is not only incorrect, it would be economically unfeasible. The Japanese make some fine goat cheeses and wines BTW. Maybe not up to the standards of your superior french palette, but very good nonetheless. Imported v.s. domestic has very little to do with cost in many places and for many different things, in fact I remember noticing at a bar that beer imported from the US (and even some from Europe) was less expensive than some Japanese domestic. Of course, like everything else in asia, it depends on where you go for your food.


    Are you asking me what Japanese people eat for breakfast? Well a traditional Japanese breakfast consists of Miso soup, rice, and possibly some fish.

    But by no means is that your only option. you can eat excellent fresh baked french pastries, omlettes, eggs benedict, pancakes, dim-sum, cereal, fresh fruit, scrambled eggs, sausages, a proper english breakfast, hashbrowns, whatever... thinking you have to eat sushi and rice three meals a day is ludicrous.

    I would be in real trouble in France, since I don't really like eating foie gras, escargo and drinking wine for every meal.

    Globetrotter -

    If thats the case, then SURELY there are no AMERICAN cities on your list of "great food cities" or are you suggesting that "american cuisine" (I.E. hamburgers, barbeque, hotdogs, pizza, Jello, etc) ranks among the worlds best?
     
  19. ernest

    ernest Well-Known Member

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    Russian have gone for long time (enough to allow a generation to speak English)

    In east of Europe many people have always spoken German particulary in Hungary (dont' forget the Autro-hungarian Empire and that East Germany was a model in the east bloc so many people learnt german).

    And people from east Europe are very talented for languages, much more than Japanese.

    Everybody under 30 years speaks English because English is everywhere (all movies on TV or cinema are in original version with subtitles). I think that in Japan (like in France) everything on TV is in Japanese (French).
     
  20. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Well-Known Member

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    Wow, its good to know that. I'll tell the Japanese to stop wasting their time learning different languages, since all Eastern Europeans are inherently better at it. They will be sooo ashamed.
     

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