1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

What are your 10 favorite cities in the world?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by drizzt3117, Nov 24, 2004.

  1. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    I'm going there on my european trip next summer, I am reading Alan Richman's book and basically he said he loved the city but hated the food... hopefully I don't have that experience.
     
  2. Styleman

    Styleman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    367
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Location:
    Surrey/South West London, UK
    I'm sure I can see why may people did not mention Naples, its very dirty. I personaly don't mind that though.
     
  3. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Just saw something on TV showing postwar Sarejevo, that place is apparently starting to be rebuilt but is still pretty messed up. Unfortunate, when I was in grade school, we had a guest lecturer that showed us a slide show on Sarejevo, saying it was one of the prettiest cities in Europe... it was quite nice... pretty sad.
     
  4. clarinetplayer

    clarinetplayer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,607
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2002
    Location:
    Michigan
    1. Ann Arbor, Michigan
    2. San Francisco
    3. Toronto
    4. Montreal
     
  5. mnemonic

    mnemonic Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    104
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2004
    Location:
    Seattle
    seattle-dark ambience

    vancouver, b.c.- same, but with a much better seaside.

    berlin- relaxing, home to some of the greatest musicians and producers in all the world.

    new york- america's answer to itself

    paris- no particular reason, but it feels very much like home.



    hmm...more like a top 5.

    johnny.
     
  6. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Anyone climb diamond head before?
     
  7. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member

    Messages:
    33,259
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    I think that the context makes that clear. Personally, I prefer high tea, with pasties and real, substantial food, to finger snadwiches and biscuits. But then again, maybe I am, in the words of ernest, "country."
     
  8. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
  9. ViroBono

    ViroBono Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    259
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    UK
    Just so. High tea was definitely for the working class. Those of us who are 'county' rather than 'country' find that afternoon tea does us very well.
     
  10. lady_nutella

    lady_nutella Member

    Messages:
    7
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    In no particular order (except for London, which is my definite first):

    1. London
    2. NYC
    3. Paris
    4. Rome
    5. Singapore
    6. Tokyo
    7. Las Vegas (albeit I'm too young to truly enjoy it)
    8. Honolulu
    9. Amsterdam

    Don't know about 10.
     
  11. TomW

    TomW Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    436
    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2004
    Location:
    the wastes of the Northern Nevada desert
    In no particular order:

    San Francisco
    Toronto
    NYC
    Dublin
    New Orleans
    London
    Venice
    Paris
    Marrakesh
    Sydney
    Bejing

    okay - I needed 11. there are many cities I haven't visited as yet , and the list is subject to change when I do. I'd love to make it to St. Petersburg, Vienna, Budapest, and Glasgow.. someday I will.
     
  12. Richie_Rich

    Richie_Rich Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    any particular order

    San Francisco
    Paris
    Milan
    Sienna
    Amsterdam
    Antwerp
    Florence
    Geneva
     
  13. ernest

    ernest Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,564
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2004
    Location:
    PARIS
    Don't you exagerate the gypsies in Paris?

    I really think you have more in Vienna than in Paris.
     
  14. ernest

    ernest Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,564
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2004
    Location:
    PARIS
    Very exepensive city Food better than in Europe? Nobody speaks English Only Japanese or almost If you are white = you face strong racism Hypocrisy of people (you need something, people think "no" but say "will see" smiling as if it was "yes")
     
  15. mnemonic

    mnemonic Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    104
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2004
    Location:
    Seattle
     
  16. ernest

    ernest Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,564
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2004
    Location:
    PARIS
    At which price? How much is an apple? A goat cheese? A bottle of wine? A tomato?

    You can always find worse.
    The question was to be among the best 10 in the world. And you can find at least 20 cities in the world where food is better than in Tokyo (in choice and quality)

    Most of japanese I met didn't speak English (and they were the most open to west culture ones.). Whose who speaks are very hard to understand because of their acccent. They speak English as if they were speaking japanese.

    Going in a city where nothing is written in English (in Paris many restaurant have menu in English) and where you must look at pictures to choose what you eat is not very attractive.



    Their confort zone is so complicate and different from ours that you can not avoid bad surprises...
    Japanese are one of the most racist people.
    Exemple = they have no jews and many of them declare not no like jews...

    I know that. You can call it as you want but the problem is the same = it is too different from ours habits to be attractive for us.

    I have read about Japan and know people who have visited Japan. A friend of mine spent 3 days without talking to anybody in Tokyo because nobody was speaking English (she speaks well and like to speak very much, she lived 1 year in Canada, traveled in Mexico, Brazil, Europe, US, Hong Kong and told me she had never seen people speaking English so few...)


    What is the % of blacks/hispanic/jews/italian/chinese... in NYC, LA, SF, Paris, London, Milano, Sidney, Vancouver, Berlin, Vienne, Madrid...??
    What is the same % in Tokyo?

    Tokyo is not at all a cosmopolite city. So less attractive than a cities with 100 differents nationality like NYC where you can travel from Italy to China when you cross the street.


    Tokyo is one of the city I would like to SEE. Probably in the top 10.

    But I don't think  it is one of the best to live in.
     
  17. alchimiste

    alchimiste Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    577
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    Location:
    a fine country
    Same applies to Ernest so...
     
  18. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    19,179
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Location:
    Where Eagles Dare!
    Well Ernest, the topic of this thread isn't "What cities would you like to live in" it's "What are you ten favorite cities in the world"

    As far as living there goes - yeah, I don't suppose you'd enjoy living there. I know quite a few Americans and Europeans that would never even think of it. First of all, you have to love city life.

    The cost, crowds, and culture can be overwhelming. You have to be prepared for it. It is literally in many cases quite staggering. (see Lost In Translation for example) It is very easy to get disconnected and depressed - but if you have that kind of expectation and attitude while over there - you might as well save your money and watch some American reality T.V. and the State Of The Union Address. Now THAT is depressing. (I'll send you a tape if you REALLY want) The easiest thing in the world to do is to ATTEMPT talking to some people over there. Many of them speak excellent French too - it's the third most common language taught over there, and many students take more of it in school than English. France is as highly romanticized as America is nowadays, so chances are good that just about any Japanese person under the age of 30 is going to either speak passable English or passable French or both. I found that most English speakers over there had perfectly understandable speech, well - about as good as your writing in English anyways - and I would like to think that I understand what you are saying most of the time.

    Also, as you pointed out - the culture is so radically different from say, Europe, that if you just landed in Narita without knowing anything about Japan, or what to expect, you might as well have just landed on Mars. Perhaps your friend just wasn't willing to try and make any friends in the three days she was there. Or maybe she didn't know where to look for any. I'd bet that if she would have researched a little before hand, gotten a pen-pal, a tour guide, or took a halfway decent guidebook, she would have had a much better time. Three days isn't a lot of time in Tokyo anyways, It takes most people longer than that to recover from jet lag.

    As far as I'm concerned, none of those things detract from Tokyo being a great city. And seeing as I've been there, and you have not - I believe that I am the first hand authority on the subject in this conversation. I may have to bow out if Bic Pentameter of Kaga chime in with an opposing veiwpoint however, as they actually live there.
     
  19. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    19,179
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Location:
    Where Eagles Dare!

    BETTER? I would really have to dispute you there, but then again, perhaps you don't like Japanese food. And as far as finding 20 cities in the world with greater CHOICES in food than Tokyo - I would like to see you prove that. I can come up with restaraunt guides for Tokyo that are as big as some cities phone books. I would say that *possibly* NYC has a wider selection... and thats probably about it. I mean, I know of not one, but TWO Basque restaraunts in Tokyo, outside of a few small areas in Spain - I've never heard of many others, and especially not two in the same city. French, American, Spanish, Mexican, Mediterranean, Indian, Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, Vegan, Nordic, Italian, Irish, British, and all the other standard cuisines are overwhelmingly abundant. As far as pricing goes - when I am over there, I spend on average $10-20 US dollars per meal. Thats about the same I'd spend here. Price isn't really that different unless you are eating in the swankiest of establishments, or are intent on consuming only delicacies like Fugu, out of season, or imported items. Guiness is rather pricey in the English pubs I went to, but then again - I guess it depends on the pub.

    If you are so intent on eating nothing but goat cheese and drinking wine, why even leave home? I mean, you can do that in France.
     
  20. Fabienne

    Fabienne Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,030
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2004
    Tokyo Slim,

    My Japanese lady friend, who now lives in the US and is married to a Frenchman, knew a lot about French cooking before she met her husband. Do you have any insight into how the Japanese generally feel about French cooking? To me, it felt as though it was almost part of her regular repertoire, she knew the terms, etc, which surprised me greatly.

    Once, she cooked us a traditional Japanese "peasant" meal, and my oh my was it hard to swallow... The appetizers were some seaweed salad with an abominable dressing (I usually like seaweed salads), then shrimp balls, steamed (tasteless, strange consistency), then a stew with far too many shitake mushrooms, and a sweet root vegetable, and finally a gooey bean custard, fairly tasteless, almost impossible to tear from the bowl. I ate bravely, but it was a trial for my husband. I much prefer it when she cooks Thai or French dishes for us.

    Fabienne
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by