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Vinyl Records and Turntables Are Gaining Sales.

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by LabelKing, Dec 18, 2009.

  1. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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  2. Pawz

    Pawz Senior member

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    I 'inherited' a ton of records from my grandmother (a record player, too!). lol I should put them to use. I also have a small collection of broadway records I bought because I liked the covers. Maybe I'll give 'em a listen.
     
  3. AThingForCashmere

    AThingForCashmere Senior member

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/07/ny...2&ref=nyregion

    Perhaps someday the Reel to Reel player will arise again too.


    I think this is fantastic. Other than live music, a high-end turntable setup is as satisfying as music gets. Maybe not the most "accurate" or with the most dynamic range, just the most satisfying.

    I forget who it was (David Byrne or Neil Young?) who once said that digital music fills your ears, and leaves your soul empty. It's so true. Many younger kids have never heard analog recordings and have no idea what they're missing.

    Of course this assumes studios are using original analog master tapes to master this new vinyl, at least for classic era material. It would be a real shame, not to mention a huge ripoff if they were simply taking analog output from a digital source and using that to master this vinyl.
     
  4. voxsartoria

    voxsartoria Senior member

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    Of course this assumes studios are using original analog master tapes to master this new vinyl, at least for classic era material. It would be a real shame, not to mention a huge ripoff if they were simply taking analog output from a digital source and using that to master this vinyl.

    I have a rather large LP collection dating back to the 1970s when I started buying albums as a teenager.

    Among my LPs is this gem:

    [​IMG]

    This was the first pop album recorded entirely digitally, and of course, there was no digital playback media then except for PCM. It's the epitome of bad music and horrible sound, a winning combination.


    - B
     
  5. BlackMesa

    BlackMesa Active Member

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    The good old days of Love Plus 1
     
  6. JohnnyLaw

    JohnnyLaw Senior member

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    I probably have hearing damage from years of basement shows with in-the-red PAs, plus most of what I listen to seems to have been recorded in a dumpster, so sound quality is obviously not an issue for me. The whole audiophile thing seems pretty ridiculous, really (two words: styrofoam cups).

    I just love handling records. CDs feel cheap and flimsy and the cases and booklets are tiny. Plus, the single is a really good format for lots of bands. If you don't have enough material for a full LP of great songs, you put out a 7". No filler.

    I don't feel that you get much more from a CD than an mp3. A record seems worth the money (especially if it's got a gatefold jacket, colour vinyl, full-sized liner notes, etc.). Records appeal to the obsessive collector in me as well.
     
  7. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    The fetishist in me buys up rare post-punk records, which I then record onto magnetic tape to preserve the vinyl.

    I have a high quality system since I believe if you're going to listen to the stuff, you should do it in the most ideal conditions permissible. However, oftentimes this reveals the sources' original faults since a lot of that stuff was DIY music released on shoe-string budgets.
     
  8. Alias

    Alias Senior member

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    My father has a still-functioning reel-to-reel player. It's awesome.
     
  9. Faded501s

    Faded501s Senior member

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    There's no better source than good wax but the gap is closing rapidly. Remastered digital music run through better and better DACs rivals even the best wax nowadays. The only real reason to own a turntable is for "the effect" and because you like the process. Or if you like album art and liner notes.

    Records can be a very expensive proposition if you do it right. A buddy of mine put well over $20k into equipment and a budding wax collection only to decide later that he liked my (much cheaper) digital set-up more. I think the trend is already starting to drift back to digital...especially in the audiophile market.
     
  10. grundletaint

    grundletaint Senior member

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    i have a nice-sized vinyl collection assembled from various relatives. i need a turntable to replace my shitty sony piece of shit.

    i'm going back and forth b/t belt and direct-drive. in all honesty, i'll probably barely even use the thing so will it really make a difference which one i choose?
     
  11. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    I agree with Faded501s. The quality CD player to LP gap has narrowed significantly. I am a big lover of LP playing. There is something great about keeping music in the analog domain and the pleasure of listening intently to good music, not as some background music. I would also point out that we are in a Golden Age of fine audiophile reissues. The current MusicMatters Jazz LPs rival anything that has been done and the Doors LP box set was incredible. It's a really fun time to be an audiophile and music lover. [​IMG]
     
  12. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    Here's my VPI Scoutmaster playing the new blue vinyl Miles Davis Kind of Blue: [​IMG] For you audio fans, that's a Grado Sonata wood body cartridge (great cartridge, a bit warm though) and the acrylic platter is translucent so it picks up color really well. VPI saw this pic, asked for a copy, and is planning to include it in an upcoming gallery section for their website. This is just the entry level JMW9 arm which is a unipivot design. It tracks very well and has some advantages over the longer 10.5" arm.
     
  13. Faded501s

    Faded501s Senior member

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    Here's my VPI Scoutmaster playing the new blue vinyl Miles Davis Kind of Blue:

    For you audio fans, that's a Grado Sonata wood body cartridge (great cartridge, a bit warm though) and the acrylic platter is translucent so it picks up color really well. VPI saw this pic, asked for a copy, and is planning to include it in an upcoming gallery section for their website.


    [​IMG] That is one COOL pic! Nice table AF. If I had the $ I'd probably get into wax but just "decent" hardware would probably cost 5X what I've got into my system. This dude I'm talking about has one of those architectural-looking jobs with the detached motor that drives the belt. I forget what make it is but it is QUITE impressive looking + $700 cartridge and $700 record cleaner, etc., etc. Too rich for my $100 Oppo blood [​IMG]
     
  14. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    [​IMG] That is one COOL pic! Nice table AF. If I had the $ I'd probably get into wax but just "decent" hardware would probably cost 5X what I've got into my system. This dude I'm talking about has one of those architectural-looking jobs with the detached motor that drives the belt. I forget what make it is but it is QUITE impressive looking + $700 cartridge and $700 record cleaner, etc., etc. Too rich for my $100 Oppo blood [​IMG]

    Thanks. [​IMG]

    Audio Technica PL120 is under $200. Rega P1 with cartridge is under $350. [​IMG]

    The VPI I have has a detached motor which drives the platter with the black "belt" you see in the picture.
     
  15. sonick

    sonick Senior member

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    I would assume most new music stamped in vinyl nowadays are recorded/mixed/mastered (any or all of the above) in a digital format anyways. Besides the physical involvement listening to vinyl requires, is there any real benefit to getting these albums in vinyl if they are pressed from the same master as the CD?

    The only two new-ish albums I would say the vinyl surpasses the CD by a long-shot are the vinyl of RHCP's Stadium Arcadium and White Stripes' Icky Thump.
     
  16. AThingForCashmere

    AThingForCashmere Senior member

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    I would assume most new music stamped in vinyl nowadays are recorded/mixed/mastered (any or all of the above) in a digital format anyways. Besides the physical involvement listening to vinyl requires, is there any real benefit to getting these albums in vinyl if they are pressed from the same master as the CD?

    No. That's why I said "for classic era material". I haven't come across much of anything recorded in the last 20 years that's worth buying, let alone investing in a new turntable setup to play. Nearly everything in my music collection dates from the late 1950's to the mid-80's, when nearly all studio masters were recorded on analog tape. I hope these tapes are being used to master new vinyl releases of this material.
     
  17. Pezzaturra

    Pezzaturra Senior member

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    Analog or digital recordings can be great or complete shit. Little has to do with a format 90% has to do with mastering sound engineer and microphone placement .
    Example of old -school horrible records would be Queen :"News of teh world" vinyl or anything released by "Slade".
    So be careful out there.
     
  18. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    Analog or digital recordings can be great or complete shit. Little has to do with a format 90% has to do with mastering sound engineer and microphone placement .

    I would not say 90% is mastering. It's really three components in my opinion:

    1. Original recording quality.
    2. Mastering quality (freshness of and use of original tapes, good converters, light hand on EQ, etc.)
    3. Format's inherent resolution.

    In my experience, the best formats are LP and hirez digital, especially SACD and 24/192 DVD-Audio. Reel is way up there too. Next is CD/Lossless and AAC/MP3 follows distantly.
     
  19. Artisan Fan

    Artisan Fan Senior member

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    No. That's why I said "for classic era material". I haven't come across much of anything recorded in the last 20 years that's worth buying, let alone investing in a new turntable setup to play. Nearly everything in my music collection dates from the late 1950's to the mid-80's, when nearly all studio masters were recorded on analog tape. I hope these tapes are being used to master new vinyl releases of this material.
    Generally yes as most audiophiles shy greatly from buying any digital-sourced LPs. All the APO and MusicMatters and MFSL vinyl is from analog tapes. For newer music, much is digital but often in 24/96 sampling or 24/88.2. At that sampling rate, an LP is still preferable to a CD as there will be more detail and the recording acoustic will be captured (assuming a good original recording and decent or better mastering of course). There is much speculation around the announced Beatles LP reissues. If they use the new 24/192 digital remasters then we audiophiles will be in heaven.
     
  20. sonick

    sonick Senior member

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    For newer music, much is digital but often in 24/96 sampling or 24/88.2. At that sampling rate, an LP is still preferable to a CD as there will be more detail and the recording acoustic will be captured (assuming a good original recording and decent or better mastering of course).

    That's the info I was looking for, thanks.
     

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