Things that are pissing you off- Food & Drink Edition

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 25, 2010.

  1. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    Okay. I admit it. I was an asshole for posting the comment from the "somm". I hope everyone is now happy.
    [​IMG]
     


  2. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    Rambo
    I was asked not to respond to your attacks due to your personal situation. I will respect that request.
     


  3. Rambo

    Rambo Senior member

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    I was asked not to respond to your attacks due to your personal situation. I will respect that request.
    You don't need to add sugar because you're sweet enough as it is. [​IMG]
     


  4. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    The wild and the pure.
    OK, not to sound like an idiot, but can somebody explain the malo-oak-butter thing to me?
     


  5. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    OK, not to sound like an idiot, but can somebody explain the malo-oak-butter thing to me?

    something something something...






    Buy French.
     


  6. Homme

    Homme Senior member

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    sometimes a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. it makes us nitpicky.

    AAAC/MC educated, the bane of menswear sales assistants
     


  7. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    OK, not to sound like an idiot, but can somebody explain the malo-oak-butter thing to me?

    it's the difference between white burgundy and chablis, frenchy. chardonnay naturally has a kind of sharp green apple acidity (malic acid). to soften that, winemakers induce a second fermentation in which the malic acid is converted to lactic acid, which is perceived as rounder and creamier (buttery). this secondary fermentation is usually done when the wine is in oak, hence the descriptive "toasty buttery". this is a very popular style in American Chardonnay. in fact, you could argue that the taste of American chardonnay was set by Jess Jackson back in the '70s when he combined this toasty buttery flavor with a very small amount of residual sugar ... not perceptibly sweet ... which gives and even richer texture. Some argue this was critical for swinging a nation of scotch drinkers to white wine. Others argue that it is a travesty.
     


  8. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    I will pass on making a personal swipe at you. I generally respect your opinions but have noticed that since I do not align with your political views you have come to not respect mine about anything. Such is life.

    just for the record, it's not your opinions that i dislike, though i do disagree with many of them, it's your way of arguing them. there are many people with whom i disagree politically whose company i enjoy, both virtually and in real life.
     


  9. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    just for the record, it's not your opinions that i dislike, though i do disagree with many of them, it's your way of arguing them. there are many people with whom i disagree politically whose company i enjoy, both virtually and in real life.

    I'm sorry but I try to mirror my presentation to whom I am addressing. I hope you notice I take a different tone/tact with different posters, regardless of their political affiliation?
     


  10. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    Piob can be selectively pedantic or obtuse, but he is polite to those who are polite to him and has in the past edited a post to remove something I took issue with.
     


  11. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    [​IMG]

    Back to food.

    My braised pork belly had it's skin stick to my grill basket, even after I used non-stick spray for the grill. [​IMG]

    Saved 90% of the skin though [​IMG]
     


  12. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    it's the difference between white burgundy and chablis, frenchy. chardonnay naturally has a kind of sharp green apple acidity (malic acid). to soften that, winemakers induce a second fermentation in which the malic acid is converted to lactic acid, which is perceived as rounder and creamier (buttery). this secondary fermentation is usually done when the wine is in oak, hence the descriptive "toasty buttery". this is a very popular style in American Chardonnay. in fact, you could argue that the taste of American chardonnay was set by Jess Jackson back in the '70s when he combined this toasty buttery flavor with a very small amount of residual sugar ... not perceptibly sweet ... which gives and even richer texture. Some argue this was critical for swinging a nation of scotch drinkers to white wine. Others argue that it is a travesty.

    You're too late, Sally, I already told him!
    But you're spot on. I don't know if you or someone else brought up the quote regarding residual sugar, but Americans have dry tastes and sweet palates.
     


  13. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    You're too late, Sally, I already told him!
    But you're spot on. I don't know if you or someone else brought up the quote regarding residual sugar, but Americans have dry tastes and sweet palates.


    well, i'm not privy to you two's backchannel tit-a-tits.
    i think the correct quote is "talk dry, drink sweet". ask most fine diners and they will scoff at the notion of a sweet wine, when those are some of the most spectacular made (and remarkably versatile ... jeremiah t swears that yquem is the perfect match for everything from oysters to roast beef ... i've had it with roast beef and he's not wrong).
    at the same time, the "dry" wines they'll prefer will have a trace of sweetness ... not mogen-david sweet, but just enough to give it weight and roundness.
    as i said, it's the transition from a cocktail culture.
     


  14. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Having a Ball

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    well, i'm not privy to you two's backchannel tit-a-tits.
    i think the correct quote is "talk dry, drink sweet". ask most fine diners and they will scoff at the notion of a sweet wine, when those are some of the most spectacular made (and remarkably versatile ... jeremiah t swears that yquem is the perfect match for everything from oysters to roast beef ... i've had it with roast beef and he's not wrong).
    at the same time, the "dry" wines they'll prefer will have a trace of sweetness ... not mogen-david sweet, but just enough to give it weight and roundness.
    as i said, it's the transition from a cocktail culture.


    Yep. Your boy Matt Kramer did some research on an incredibly old (as in, older than you and rube COMBINED!) pairing from one of the old time fancy French places in NYC. It was pretty incredible. Yquem with oysters, the best red wine served w/ petit fours, and the most surprising thing to me--- champagne with lamb and brown sauce.
     


  15. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    yeah, there's a lot of those weird old combinations. of course, without knowing exactly what the wines tasted like (they were different then) and what the food tasted like (it was different then, too), it's kind of hard to know. Plus, there has always been an aspect of fine dining that is all about conspicuous consumption. Hard to know which of those combinations fit that bill, too.
    I used to wonder what it must have been like to eat at some of those old restaurants. The one i'm most curious about is point (not THAT old ... i've known people who ate their when the chef was alive). they said the food was too heavy for people's palates these days.
     


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