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Summer business suit materials

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by retronotmetro, Jan 27, 2005.

  1. retronotmetro

    retronotmetro Senior member

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    We've had a few threads lately about summer suits. I'm curious what materials people favor. I currently have only one suit that I consider business-appropriate, which is a dark tan tropical weight wool. I've been thinking of getting one or two more suits for wear on very hot days. While I've always been intrigued by cotton summer suits, they don't seem like a practical choice for a business suit. Anyone have a favorite wrinkle-resistant material for the summer?
     
  2. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    quarter-lined wool jacket, and if you work inside, you'll freeze in the a/c without.
     
  3. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    silk, light weight wool
     
  4. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Wool fresco, or a wool-mohair blend.
     
  5. NewYorkBuck

    NewYorkBuck Senior member

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    Seersucker. Not for business? I work in a conservative Wall St firm and wear it with white bucks on summer fridays. Almost always get a compliement.
     
  6. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Not really wrikle resistant, though.
     
  7. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  8. stripes22

    stripes22 Member

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    I like silk or silk/wool blend (label=yale coop--no idea where it was made).  Packs very well.  Also have a beautiful Italian cut grey linen suit, but wrinkles very easily so is high maintenance.

    I love seersucker:  Do you think anyone can wear seersucker?  I think you have to be either young, thin, and handsome OR over 60 to get away with it.  But, I admit that I want one.  (So tell me I'm wrong so that I can get one before I'm 60).
     
  9. jester

    jester Senior member

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    Generally lightweight wool; occasionally seersucker; linen and linen-silk blends when I can find something nice that I can afford; and one tan cotton suit from BB.

    Mostly lightweight wool is fine. I don't spend too much time outdoors in a suit, so it's just the walk to and from airconditioned places (home, office, subway).
     
  10. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I love learning something new - what is wool fresco?
     
  11. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    It's a fresco, but done with wool instead of plaster. Michelangelo considered it for the Sistine Chapel, but decided to go with the latter.

    Jon.
     
  12. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (globetrotter @ Jan. 27 2005,17:26) I Â love learning something new - what is wool fresco?
    It's a fresco, but done with wool instead of plaster. Michelangelo considered it for the Sistine Chapel, but decided to go with the latter. Jon.
    that's what I thought, but see I usualy wear plaster in the spring and fall, so I guess using wool to make a fresco in the summer makes sense [​IMG]
     
  13. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    It is worsted wool cloth, made with multi-ply yarns twisted to a high rate of tension, and then woven in an open plain weave. Â The high "twist" level makes it wrinkle resistant and spongy. Â The density of the threads gives it a nice drape. Â The openess of the weave makes is it breathable and cool. Â Basically, it mimics some of the properties of heavy cloth while being much cooler. Look at the picture in the link below: http://www.hollandandsherry.com/coll...00/hs247a.html You can clearly see the little pin dots where air can come through.
     
  14. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (globetrotter @ Jan. 27 2005,17:26) I Â love learning something new - what is wool fresco?
    It is worsted wool cloth, made with multi-ply yarns twisted to a high rate of tension, and then woven in an open plain weave. Â The high "twist" level makes it wrinkle resistant and spongy. Â The density of the threads gives it a nice drape. Â The openess of the weave makes is it breathable and cool. Â Basically, it mimics some of the properties of heavy cloth while being much cooler. Look at the picture in the link below: http://www.hollandandsherry.com/coll...00/hs247a.html You can clearly see the little pin dots where air can come through.
    cool. I honestly do not remember having ever noticed a suit in that kind of fabric. I have seen sports coats, though. what cut of suit would be appropriate in that fabric, please?
     
  15. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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  16. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Tailors on the board and more knowledgeable folk should feel free to sound off.

    My current effort is a standard DB suit from A&S-- very soft and light. That fabric is also much finer and less "sport-jackety" than the Holland & Sherry bunch.

    I have another in the works that is 2-ply and therefore a little fuzzier and heavier, albeit with a lot of holes in it. Solid grey DB. We'll see if the coolness/wrinkle-free tradeoff continues to be satisfactory.

    One that really intrigued me, and may be on the next round of summer suits, was a 12-ounce chalk stripe (navy or medium grey-- not pictured). For some reason, the chalk stripes mitigated the fuzziness of the surface, evoking the look of flannel even though it was obviously quite a different animal. Could do that one in DB, but in the interests of ventilation might go for a 2.5-button with rather soft shoulders and no lining.
     
  17. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    I don't favor the wrinkle-free stuff. I mean, I'd rather just let it wrinkle. Same with "stain-resistant" fabrics.

    For summer suitings, I've taken tropical weight wool -- I've gone bespoke in Hong Kong and really have been pleased.

    You can also get good summer suits at the Andover shop.

    I've gone poplin -- but beware of a poplin blend -- I have a Brooks poplin blend and it doesn't breathe well. Or I don't breathe within it, rather.

    I also like linen. I know it's informal but so was the idea of working in the city during summer months.



    (I was talking to an old school friend who remarked to me, rather naively, last summer, "everyone's left New York for the summer". Poor idiot).
     
  18. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    Is there even anything like Palm Beach cloth still being made in the US?

    Or even overseas? The London Lounge Cloth Club might do something interesting with lightweight fabrics soon.
     
  19. retronotmetro

    retronotmetro Senior member

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    The wool fresco seems like an intriguing choice. I also wonder how much difference a quarter-lined or half-lined coat would make on the lighter weight wools that I typically get.

    Seersucker has no appeal to me because the commonly available seersucker is always in light color combinations that look like crap on me (too low contrast). It would also draw entirely too much attention to me in my particular business and location (LA, litigator at large firm).

    I think wrinkle tolerance is pretty much an individual thing--I don't have it. I have a couple of linen shirts and one linen sport coat, and can't ever get over the "damn this is wrinkled" hurdle, so I can't picture myself splurging on a linen suit. I'm kind of ambivalent on whether I'd want to walk into court or important meetings wearing linen.
     
  20. Kevin_lee

    Kevin_lee Member

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    Silk, Mohair Wool or Linen are perfect for Summer Suits, IHO
     

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