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Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. foodguy

    foodguy Distinguished Member

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    what is your skill level? how much cooking do you do now? there's a whole helluva lot more to cooking that food than following a recipe. if you're a reasonably skilled home cook and y ou want a good baby steps book, pick up the robuchon/wells "simply french".
     


  2. ehkay

    ehkay Distinguished Member

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    http://www.amazon.de/Grand-Livre-Cu...46/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1324422346&sr=8-12

    It only calls for foie gras an alba truffles in every other recipe. The other ones call for perigord truffles.

    or since you're in germany

    http://www.amazon.de/Christian-Bau-...intl-de&ie=UTF8&qid=1324422483&sr=1-1-catcorr

    A lot of the stuff in this one looks pretty doable, and really good if you're willing to splurge on ingredients. Doesn't really call for any scientific ingredients, and only a few recipes even call for sous vide. Bau's newer book picks up more asian influenced stuff, but also gets a lot more complicated in technique, and if not that, the shear number of components in the a lot of the recipes would make them difficult to pull off without an army of stagieres.
     


  3. foodguy

    foodguy Distinguished Member

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    with all due respect, without a pretty advanced skill set already, that's like handing an electrical engineering manual to a guy who just wants to play world of warcraft.
     


  4. b1os

    b1os Distinguished Member

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    @fg: I think my cooking skills in "normal" circles would be considered as intermediate/advanced. Compared to matt, mm, manton, you etc. I'm a blunt amateur. I don't know an awful lot of techniques, but I think I learn pretty fast and can adapt quite good to new techniques. I really just need a picture to get a fealing for what it should look like. What do you think of Robuchon's Grand Livre de Cuisine? At a local store, I took a quick look at a newer edition, a German version, and it seemed quite good - however, 10 steps per recipe mostly seem a *little* too much...: http://www.amazon.de/Robuchon-Klass...0589/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1324421869&sr=8-1
    Is this what you mean with baby steps? Do you think I'm overestimating myself with these recipes? I don't mind spending a lot of time on it - which I guess I will - when I fancy doing it, if that's what's your main concern.

    JFYI @AEK: I do not want to splurge on ingredients. We simply don't have the money for it. I doubt I'll cook with truffles often, now that I think of it. 1g is about 2-3€ and most recipes call for 20-40g which is like 40-75€ just for one aromatic. Foie gras however, which I also consider as a haute cuisine ingredient, is more affordable. Is there a flaw in my thinking?

    Edit: For example the recipe on page 251 looks very nice. It's not expensive and looks very nice - and I guess it tastes delicious, too.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2011


  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Grand Livre is a great book. It demands a lot of skill, but is a nice way to learn things. Well done with all of those pics. Many are the same recipes from Simply French, but professionalized. I think I've made all of them at least once, so if you have questions, post them and I will try to help.
     


  6. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Stylish Dinosaur

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    truffles are a splendid luxury, there is simply no denying that they are expensive.

    I have paid some good money for food before, but can't ever imagine putting together one of those salads of thickly cut truffles in Simply French, that could be $400 of food by today's prices. Really just beyond reality at this point, no matter how much money one has.
     


  7. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Stylish Dinosaur

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    I really want to improve my knife skills what's the best way to learn?
     


  8. foodguy

    foodguy Distinguished Member

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    that's true, but you have to remember the world has changed a lot in the 20 years since that book was published. back then, you could buy first-growth bordeaux for $25 a bottle. I remember my first trip to Alba in the late '80s and we ate white truffles like crazy ... risotto would come with a half-inch drift of them ... and i don't think we ever paid more than $20 or $25. it is great that so many people are interested in food, but it has undeniably affected the prices of specialty ingredients.
     


  9. foodguy

    foodguy Distinguished Member

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    1) sharpen your knife. 2) buy LOTS of potatoes and onions. 3) dice. repeat until you puke.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2011


  10. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Like this?

    [​IMG]
     


  11. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Stylish Dinosaur

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    M

    Matt you can cook for me whenev
     


  12. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Stylish Dinosaur

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    yeah, I would've chalked it up to that. Just so many things in this world that are no longer really affordable even 10 or 20 years on - i.e. pretty much everything people like on this website. :eek: I also find all the mail order sources in that book quite whimsical, haha.
     


  13. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Stylish Dinosaur

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    oui - how thickly do you cut the truffles for those salads? they look quite thick in the book.
     


  14. b1os

    b1os Distinguished Member

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    You mean Ducasse's one from 01/2009, right? (1k pages, each recipe has a full-page picture of the finished dish) Just asking since there are so many different books out there. This looks like a good one and affordable with a price of 50€.
    Thanks for the offer to help!
     


  15. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    Pretty thick. Maybe 2 mm. The mac and cheese I posted recently has a layer of truffles 3 mm thick. You can only do it once in a while, but if you do, black truffles are not that expensive.

    b1os - the Robuchon one, not Ducasse.
     


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