pocket knives

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by dl20, Nov 28, 2009.

  1. milosz

    milosz Senior member

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    My latest is a new M1911 knife - some guy in Canada came up with a new lock design and built a frame that allows for interchangeable 1911 grip panels to be used. Got it in the mail today, I like it a lot. The grip itself is very wide for a pocket knife (obviously), but usable and feels good in my hand.

    Mine looks like the top one:

    [​IMG]

    Right now it's kind of a pre-production deal (he went to China and made these himself), but even then it was $125 for an S30V blade ($100 for 440C). I imagine these will sell incredibly well if he can get good distro in the US - what 1911 nerd doesn't want a matching knife?

    the three folders I carry/use most are a Gerber Fairbairn/Applegate, Benchmade Griptilian and a SOG Tomcat 3. Nothing too expensive or fancy, but easier for me to use than a basic liner-lock folder.
     
  2. Gradstudent78

    Gradstudent78 Senior member

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    I usually carry one of these:[​IMG]

    or one of these: [​IMG]
     
  3. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    I'm curious, why do you guys carry a pocket knife around? I can't recall being in a position where I really need a pocket knife. It's one extra thing to carry around -- why?

    To cut things with; right then. I'm sure you've needed to cut things before, but you had to go walk somewhere and find a knife to do it.

    My grandfathers both give my dad crap about never wearing a watch and never carrying a pocket knife.

    They are particularly useful at Christmas when opening presents. Or opening packages you get while walking down the driveway, because you can't wait to get in the house and find scissors. Or cutting open the packaging on basically anything that you buy (particularly blister packs). Or cutting a loose thread, instead of pulling on it and your entire hem falling out. Or trimming your finger nails. Or sharpening a pencil. Occasionally for eating fruit.

    I have something about like this right beside me right now. A (re)gift from my father; I think he got it for graduation and then gave it to me, unused, about 25 years later. I have a few others laying about as well.

    Edit - I just used this knife to cut the plastic wrap off a bottle of vitamins.


    This. Also, mine has a bottle opener in it, which has come in handy nearly as often as the blade. It's really great to be able to bring decent beer to parties without having to be the guy who is constantly asking the host whether they have a bottle opener handy.

    It's also just a normal thing where I'm from. Not everyone carries a pocket knife, but it's definitely not out of the ordinary.

    Actually, I can't think of a time that I desperately needed a knife to cut something. For letters, I stick my index finger under the flap and just open it; never got a paper cut this way. For packages, I use the ragged side of my keys; it works every time. On the other hand, I can think of a lot of problems a pocket knife would bring. For example, I live in DC, and they frown upon bringing knives into federal buildings. Having a pocket knife with me and forgetting to take it out would bring me more hassle than it's worth.

    But if I were to live in a different town, I might see a knife differently.


    It's funny you mention the federal buildings. I was in DC in the mid-90s doing the whole tourist thing. One of the places we went was the Capitol. I realized, as I got to security, that I had my knife on me. This was a big knife, too, it folded, but it wasn't small by any means. I was a teenager, so everything I did had to be overkill. Anyway, as I got to security I decided to just point it out so it didn't look like I was trying to sneak it through. When I told the woman I had a knife and showed it to her she said "well, what's it for?" I said "it's my pocket knife." She said "good answer, go ahead."

    Security actually let me bring a rather large knife into the Capitol. I suspect policies have changed radically in the last decade plus. Today I would have probably been tackled and rendered, never to be heard from again. [​IMG]
     
  4. Chiaroscuro

    Chiaroscuro Senior member

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    I have a small custom made fixed blade. small blade and a finger ring. very useful. I carry it pretty much everywhere when I am not flying

    Is it a Hide Away Knife or a karambit?
     
  5. crazyquik

    crazyquik Senior member

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    This. Also, mine has a bottle opener in it, which has come in handy nearly as often as the blade. It's really great to be able to bring decent beer to parties without having to be the guy who is constantly asking the host whether they have a bottle opener handy.

    It's also just a normal thing where I'm from. Not everyone carries a pocket knife, but it's definitely not out of the ordinary.


    I forgot about this, but that's because I carry a bottle opener on my keychain. And get asked for it all the time by people who bring microbrews to parties but don't have a pocket knife or bottle opener with them.

    Perhaps it is more of a Southern thing to carry a folder.
     
  6. MCsommerreid

    MCsommerreid Senior member

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    I usually carry a 4" Cold Steel Ti-Lite. Not too big to be cumbersome, but large enough that I don't jab myself while using it.

    Every time I pull it out to cut something, I tend to get funny looks. People are just too flighty these days, with the "zomg thats sharp! you could kill someone!!!!!" mentality. But while they're damaging themselves trying to do things like pop the plastic webbing off paper boxes or fighting with blister pack, I just pop out the ole cutter and zip-zam, whatever it is is open.

    Perhaps sometime in the future I'll upgrade to a more classy knife, but for now its a cheap rough and tumble blade.
     
  7. Surfrider

    Surfrider Senior member

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    Most of the time, I carry one of these clipped inside my back pocket: [​IMG] This is the "Harpy" made by Spyderco, a Christmas gift from my dad some 10 years ago or so. Mine, however, now has the clip welded to the scales, and has been buffed with a rouge wheel to a nice shine. My original reason for selecting a serrated, hawkbill blade was my engagement in several sports/hobbies wherein the ability to cut a taught line in a single swipe might be a lifesaving ability. This need took priority over my desire to carry what I perceived to be more flexible blade shape (like a straight-edged clip or drop point). Since then, however, I have been in very few situations wherein either the serrations or the blade shape was an inconvenience. In fact, the particularly sharp pint has been a boon more often than not. The only thing I dislike about the knife is the "drying vent" Spyder cuts into the scales. This gripe, however, is minor and only related to aesthetics. Perhaps it's part of my rural upbringing, but to me, it's unusual to not carry a small pocket knife, even if it's just something like a little Victorinox SD. Frankly, I can't imagine being without such a tool.
    Every time I pull it out to cut something, I tend to get funny looks. People are just too flighty these days, with the "zomg thats sharp! you could kill someone!!!!!" mentality.
    While I don't go out of my way to convey it, I usually don't try too hard to hide my disdain/disgust/pity for this kind of person/mentality; the kind that says inanimate objects (blades, firearms, cars, whathaveyou) are dangerous, as opposed to those people who would use said objects in a dangerous manner. I'm glad I wasn't raised to be afraid of the world. Pussies.
     
  8. Rosenberg

    Rosenberg Senior member

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    i think it definitely has a lot to do with where you are from. ive carried one since i was a kid and so has my dad as well as his dad.
     
  9. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    I carry a pre release Benchmade Osborne 942. It's been around for a long time and it has become an old trusted friend. I'll carry other knifes on occasions. One of my favorites is a ringed Razel from Graham Knifes. It's different but man is it a useful strong blade design.
     
  10. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Osprey, those are some really spectacular Damascus blades!
     
  11. Surfrider

    Surfrider Senior member

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    Osprey, those are some really spectacular Damascus blades!

    You may or may not be interested (kindly disregard this post if the latter is the case), but technically speaking, those (beautiful!) blades are examples of "pattern welding." The knowledge required for the making true "Damascus Steel" has been lost, but the term is still a common (though incorrect) colloquialism for any ferrous, pattern-welded product. The Wikipedia article on the matter is quick read, and worth the effort if one is interested in such things.

    I'm not posting to be a contrarian smartass; just trying to spread a little knowledge around.

    Good day.
     
  12. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    Is it a Hide Away Knife or a karambit?

    niether, although it is similar to a hide away. the ring is made for one finger, and it has a stumpy "handle" that sort of rests on the palm of my hand.
     
  13. Ace Rimmer

    Ace Rimmer Senior member

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    I carry the knives I was trained to use.

    Specifically, the Spyderco Endura or the smaller Delica.

    I was trained to use a saber grip so the Endura/Delica setup is perfect. Further, those knives retail for around $50-60 so they will not break your heart if you happen to damage or lose one, unlike a $300 Chris Reeve folder.

    HTH!
     
  14. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    You may or may not be interested (kindly disregard this post if the latter is the case), but technically speaking, those (beautiful!) blades are examples of "pattern welding." The knowledge required for the making true "Damascus Steel" has been lost, but the term is still a common (though incorrect) colloquialism for any ferrous, pattern-welded product. The Wikipedia article on the matter is quick read, and worth the effort if one is interested in such things. I'm not posting to be a contrarian smartass; just trying to spread a little knowledge around. Good day.
    Never knew that, thanks. I did make knives for a short period in my teens ( i was an odd kid growing up) but never dabbled in 'Pattern welded steel'. I ground the blades out of ATS-34 or 440C stainless and used stainless tangs and exotic hardwood handles.
     
  15. crazyquik

    crazyquik Senior member

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    Never knew that, thanks.

    I did make knives for a short period in my teens ( i was an odd kid growing up) but never dabbled in 'Pattern welded steel'.

    I ground the blades out of ATS-34 or 440C stainless and used stainless tangs and exotic hardwood handles.


    That's cool.

    In high school, my shop teacher said he used to teach kids to make simple fixed blade knives in machine shop class. Until, of course, we had to stop doing that for the children [​IMG]
     

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