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MEGA PEACOAT THREAD - 61 threads merged - all Peacoat questions HERE

Peacoat

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It’s interesting to read advertising blurb sometimes but in this case it’s confusing and contradictory. That piece states that the WW1 coat was made of 36 ounce melton, and later that the Buzz Rickson is an exact copy ... but uses 30 ounce “kearsey” (sic).
If they’re gonna make pronouncements as to the precision of replica gear they might at least proof read and get the basic facts of the material correct!

I think a slightly longer pea coat that can cover any blazer type jacket worn underneath is a good idea but I never liked that arrangement of too-high hand warmer pockets to accommodate lower flapped pockets. Would have been better to keep the arrangement of lower and more practical hand warmer pockets as in the ‘classic’ period. There’s a good reason that basic style was never messed with for seventy-odd years!
Exactly. The style was so long lived because it was a good style.
 

Peacoat

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I am looking for a peacoat, but historical accuracy and warmness are not my top priority. I am actually more often too warm than too cold. I want a peacoat with pockets that don't let everything fall out. Suggestions?
I've had about 20 peacoats over the years and never had anything fall out, that I am aware of.
 

jayvee

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It’s interesting to read advertising blurb sometimes but in this case it’s confusing and contradictory. That piece states that the WW1 coat was made of 36 ounce melton, and later that the Buzz Rickson is an exact copy ... but uses 30 ounce “kearsey” (sic).
If they’re gonna make pronouncements as to the precision of replica gear they might at least proof read and get the basic facts of the material correct!

I think a slightly longer pea coat that can cover any blazer type jacket worn underneath is a good idea but I never liked that arrangement of too-high hand warmer pockets to accommodate lower flapped pockets. Would have been better to keep the arrangement of lower and more practical hand warmer pockets as in the ‘classic’ period. There’s a good reason that basic style was never messed with for seventy-odd years!
exactly, something is wrong there. In the spec it says:

Custom manufacturing of the correct, heavy-weight, 30-ounce, kearsey-wool outer shell in navy blue and produced on vintage looms

that sounds pretty promising, I’ve contacted them for clarification and will report back if it’s 36oz melton or 30oz kearsey. Horses for courses but I prefer the WW1 version as I am quite tall.
 

Peacoat

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exactly, something is wrong there. In the spec it says:

Custom manufacturing of the correct, heavy-weight, 30-ounce, kearsey-wool outer shell in navy blue and produced on vintage looms

that sounds pretty promising, I’ve contacted them for clarification and will report back if it’s 36oz melton or 30oz kearsey. Horses for courses but I prefer the WW1 version as I am quite tall.
Over the years I have noticed Schott plays loose with its advertising claims. It is neither 36 oz Melton, nor 30 oz. Kearsey [sic]. It might be 30 oz. Melton, though. When Gail was alive, she would try and get an honest answer out of the ones in charge of the company, but she wasn't always successful.
 

10dence

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I am looking for a peacoat, but historical accuracy and warmness are not my top priority. I am actually more often too warm than too cold. I want a peacoat with pockets that don't let everything fall out. Suggestions?
The Private White V.C. peacoat has huge inner pockets closed with zippers, should be secure enough.
I have the S.E.H. Kelly peacoat with big pockets on the outside instead, but it's a bit more problematic to get ahold of. Usually sold out in several sizes when it hits the store for the general public.
 

jayvee

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Over the years I have noticed Schott plays loose with its advertising claims. It is neither 36 oz Melton, nor 30 oz. Kearsey [sic]. It might be 30 oz. Melton, though. When Gail was alive, she would try and get an honest answer out of the ones in charge of the company, but she wasn't always successful.
I was referring to the buzz rickson not the schott.
 

Peacoat

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I was referring to the buzz rickson not the schott.
In that case it will definitely be Melton. Not sure of the weight, though. I haven't handled it, but reports I have received say it is a finer Melton than used in the post 1979 peacoats. The Buzz is a nice fashion peacoat.
 

Peacoat

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@Thin White Duke and @jayvee pointed out discrepancies in the type and fabric and the weight in the description of the coat. I just saw a Buzz advertised for sale and noticed another huge discrepancy: The coat pictured on the Buzz website is actually a WWII coat with pre WWII buttons. That's the only change they made—they simply used WWI buttons on a WWII coat. This isn't to say the Buzz peacoat isn't a good coat, because all the comments I have heard, is that it is a well made coat.

I wanted to make sure the style hadn't changed between WWI and 1938 when the WWII style was introduced. I looked at the 1922 Navy clothing regulations and the peacoat was basically the same in 1922 as it was in WWI.* This style was in use up until about 1938 when the WWII coat was placed in service. See images below.

Also, as to weight of the shell, the 1922 regs required that a 30 oz. wool be used. It doesn't specify Kersey or Melton. I will need to locate the peacoat contract specifications for that year as the type of shell will be specified. As yet I haven't done so.
______
* And this style was in use in 1897, as I have the regs for that year. That's as far back as I have been able to trace the US Navy peacoat.

World War I Era Peacoat:

WWI Era.jpg


Sailors in the 1920s:

1920s Sailors.jpg


1897 Peacoat:

1897 Peacoat copy.jpg
 

Peacoat

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Wore my 1968 USN Kersey in Buffalo recently. It handled the cold admirably. Wrote some musings about cold weather style on the blog.
View attachment 1549609
Good trim fit. Those buttons replace the fouled anchor buttons in about 1976. You look good as a Petty Officer 1st Class.
 

Thin White Duke

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Good trim fit. Those buttons replace the fouled anchor buttons in about 1976. You look good as a Petty Officer 1st Class.
Thanks - I debated whether or not to keep the badge (debate is upthread) as I don’t want anyone thinking I’m trying to claim credit not due to me. But it has to be said the red stripes look great against the navy background.

My Dad would have been one hundred years old this year. He was an RAF pilot in WW2. I always fancied marching in the Remembrance Day parade on his behalf one day and his centenary year would be a good time to do so but getting home during the pandemic would be problematic. I had it in mind to wear his medals as I understand it’s acceptable to wear them on the right side of your chest in memory of a family member so as not be seen as trying to claim credit.
 

jayvee

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@Thin White Duke and @jayvee pointed out discrepancies in the type and fabric and the weight in the description of the coat. I just saw a Buzz advertised for sale and noticed another huge discrepancy: The coat pictured on the Buzz website is actually a WWII coat with pre WWII buttons. That's the only change they made—they simply used WWI buttons on a WWII coat. This isn't to say the Buzz peacoat isn't a good coat, because all the comments I have heard, is that it is a well made coat.

I wanted to make sure the style hadn't changed between WWI and 1938 when the WWII style was introduced. I looked at the 1922 Navy clothing regulations and the peacoat was basically the same in 1922 as it was in WWI.* This style was in use up until about 1938 when the WWII coat was placed in service. See images below.

Also, as to weight of the shell, the 1922 regs required that a 30 oz. wool be used. It doesn't specify Kersey or Melton. I will need to locate the peacoat contract specifications for that year as the type of shell will be specified. As yet I haven't done so.
______
* And this style was in use in 1897, as I have the regs for that year. That's as far back as I have been able to trace the US Navy peacoat.

World War I Era Peacoat:

View attachment 1538249

Sailors in the 1920s:

View attachment 1538250

1897 Peacoat:

View attachment 1538253
I thought the WW1 version was a bit longer?
 

jayvee

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That’s why I like it tbh, at 6’2” I think it’ll fit me better. Have you looked into the peacoat in other countries’ navies at all? I think I’ve seen an old photo of Churchill wearing a longer one and vaguely remember seeing a French company that made one apparently to their old navy spec - hazy on the details unfortunately.
 

Peacoat

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I spent a lot of time trying to find the British version, but wasn't successful. This is probably the pic of Sir Winston to which you referred. Don't know if this is what the British sailors actually wore or not. Someone suggested he may have come up with it on his own. I tend to believe it is the real deal.

Winston-Churchill-in-Reefer-Coat-with-Horizontal-Pockets.png
 

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