How do these shoes stack up?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by slaavwmr, Jan 19, 2005.

  1. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    I'll be as patient as I can, then.
     
  2. johnnynorman3

    johnnynorman3 Senior member

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    John, another suggestion is to take the shoes to a very good shoe place -- not all cities have them, but most do -- and they could probably do some extra burnishing on the toe area for you. Burnishing on shall cordovan is pretty cool -- it creates a "bumpy" effect, such that it isn't smooth and shiny like the rest of the shoe. It also darkens it of course. The effect can be cool, but I wouldn't trust it to an amateur.
     
  3. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    Interesting. I wonder if anyone knows of someone in Chicago who can do it? I'd probably not even attempt to ask around Indy.
     
  4. slaavwmr

    slaavwmr Senior member

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    (slaavwmr @ Jan. 20 2005,06:26) I agree with everyone about the price. I thought it would be interesting to get peoples opinion on the styling since I usually say a cap-toe is a cap-toe and I thought this shoe stood out to me in the picture. But, I can't see myself paying $600 for a shoe that I can't be sure will last me for at least 10 years. However, what are peoples general opinion on the quality of a shoe like that? I see a lot of EG, C&J and Alden talk. Not too much Italian shoe talk
    I know that Gamos' aren't all that popular on this site, but I must confess to being in love with the Ferragamo  "style". Yes, they're pricey (or overpriced, depending on your point of view), but I don't think you can go wrong -- style-wise, at least -- buying a Gamo'. Also, IMHO, the quality of Ferragamo's Tramezza Collection is quite high. Personally, I'm quite taken by this shoe, and next time I'm at NM or Nordstrom, it's mine. ;-) [​IMG] JV
    Thats my point. From a price perspective the shoes are expensive. From a quality perspective It doesn't look so good. But, from a stylish perspective they have some nice looking shoes. I have great self control and i will not buy them @ $600. But, they really jumped out at me as a nice pair of shoes.
     
  5. jcusey

    jcusey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Wait a minute, wait a minute. Ferragamo Tramezza shoes are very well-made. They're just overpriced.
     
  6. slaavwmr

    slaavwmr Senior member

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    (slaavwmr @ Jan. 20 2005,19:35) Thats my point. From a price perspective the shoes are expensive. From a quality perspective It doesn't look so good. But, from a stylish perspective they have some nice looking shoes. I have great self control and i will not buy them @ $600. But, they really jumped out at me as a nice pair of shoes.
    Wait a minute, wait a minute. Ferragamo Tramezza shoes are very well-made. They're just overpriced.
    Thats good to know. I will look out for them for less money and then maybe get a pair.
     
  7. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Before I really started to get in to high-end shoes my go-to dress shoes were a pair of dark tan Ferragamo Tramezza cap-toes which were, I think, identical to the black ones in the Neiman Marcus link starting this thread. They looked good and wore well. I gave them to my cousin once I had a couple of pairs of Edward Green's, but don't regret buying them (paid $129 at Nordstrom Rack I think.) I like the Tramezza's as well or better than Gravati's and a lot of other shoes in the same quality range, but at $600 they are WAY overpriced. Shoe prices have gotten out of hand lately..
     
  8. marc37

    marc37 Senior member

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    l read somewhere that the Tramezza's had a high amount of handwork in the shoe. ls this true?

    l recall about 5 years ago seeing a gorgeous pair of Farragamo ankle boots for $750 U.S ($1095 Aust). l don't know whether they were Tramezza or not. Very expensive none the less.

    l don't own any Farragamo's because they are too pricey for the quality. l just have no desire to purchase such shoes. The average cost in Australia is $600 - $700 Aust. They don't fit me well and they don't seem solid.
     
  9. jcusey

    jcusey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Tramezza shoes are handmade in the same sense that most high-end shoes are handmade. They're probably clicked by hand and closed and made by human working on a machine one pair at a time. They're not handmade in the same sense that Vass shoes are handmade, for example.

    They're good shoes, probably roughly equivalent in quality to Santoni's mid-range Goodyear-welted shoes (not the Fatte a Mano line), although the aesthetic is completely different.
     
  10. RIDER

    RIDER Senior member

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    Well, I can't believe I am posting this since it concerns Ferragamo, but I am going to jump in here and disagree with many. I do not like Ferragamo generally. For the consumer, the shoes are routinely overpriced when compared to, say, a couple hundred other factories in Italy. A discount of 25% or less would not help the ratio much. My view of Ferragamo is further tainted by their poor business practices; their people, as well as policies, range from arrogant to incompetent and the line is rarely profitable - the name is the thing. This, of course, is of little interest here - I only mention it to point out that my view of Ferragamo is overwhelmingly negative. And biased.

    However, in the case of the Tremezza shoes, I think they are well worth the asking price. The construction is basically the same as Vass, without the hand lasting. And the materials are top notch. If a Vass shoe is worth $900, how is this shoe not worth 1/3 less? More handwork goes into these shoes than the J&M handmades I keep hearing about again, and they sold for $1000 over a decade ago. To me, if you get even a small discount on these shoes, they will be well worth the investment.
     
  11. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    Labels I don't care about.  I judge each individual piece by its own merits or detriments.  Today I wore a reversible cashmere topcoat in this hell of sleet, rain, and bitter wind driven from the nightmares of so many Quebecois and sent down to pierce through my bones.  The coat kept me warm and dry.  It is way cool with its ticket pocket.  The label is a tiny slip of cloth sewn in to the inside of one of the pockets (because the coat is reversable).  I never look at the label.  But, today, I look.  It reads, Salvatore Ferragamo.  For the love.
     
  12. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Now I'm curious. What handwork goes into the Tramezza shoes?? I thought their claims were the normal marketing-speak...
     
  13. markr

    markr Senior member

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    What do folks think about the Bally Scribe collection (www.bally.com)? I really like the styling of the "Alban," but they're also $600+. Seem quite well made according to the description on the website.
     
  14. RIDER

    RIDER Senior member

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    All the welting, including a carved feather, and the outsole work. I used to have a half production sample, like the Vass ones you guys sent me, and the work was extensive. Look at the insoles, they are very nice. Basically, one of the upper workshops does the pattern cutting, skiving and stitching. They then go to another private workshop where the lasting is done. Finally, they are sent 'up the mountain', so to speak, where another group of people does all the handwork I refer to. This is sort of standard operating procedure in Italy, and something Ferragamo himself standardized in regards to volume and exportation.

    The second shoe pictured in this thread is not one of the Tramezza shoes, btw.
     
  15. slaavwmr

    slaavwmr Senior member

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    What handwork goes into the Tramezza shoes??
    All the welting, including a carved feather, and the outsole work. Â I used to have a half production sample, like the Vass ones you guys sent me, and the work was extensive. Â Look at the insoles, they are very nice. Â Basically, one of the upper workshops does the pattern cutting, skiving and stitching. Â They then go to another private workshop where the lasting is done. Â Finally, they are sent 'up the mountain', so to speak, where another group of people does all the handwork I refer to. Â This is sort of standard operating procedure in Italy, and something Ferragamo himself standardized in regards to volume and exportation. The second shoe pictured in this thread is not one of the Tramezza shoes, btw.
    But the original cap-toe I linked to was?
     

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