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Closing Vents when Aggressively taking in a jacket?

greggerspa

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Hi styleforum community,

I have a question about what I should expect from a trip the tailor. I'm quite skinny, about 5'9 and 120lbs but with broad shoulders, so most jackets I buy OTR (even "slim fits") need to be taken in quite a bit in the back and sides.

The last blazer I bought was a Todd Snyder jacket with double vents. It was a good final sale deal online, so I took a (maybe ill-advised) gamble on it. It luckily fit in the shoulders, so I was able to bring it to my local tailor, who suggested closing up the double vents as he was pinning it. I decided to go for it, since I thought the jacket's blue windowpane might look great with the more streamlined silhouette.

When I got the jacket back, the seam work was admirable. The patch pockets are maybe a little comically at my sides rather than in front, but that's of course to be expected in this case. The quite open quarters of the jacket, however, part a lot when the jacket is closed and draping normally. The result is the triangle of shirt below the jacket closure that I would prefer to avoid. I'm thinking some of this has to do with the relatively high button stance of the jacket, which is probably a bit too high for my longish torso. The problem is fixed by buttoning the bottom button, and there is still a bit of room in the higher part of the skirt and no pulling when I do so--in other words, the jacket is not tight around the top of my rear. My pants are maybe lower-rise than most suit pants at slightly below my navel, but not extremely low rise or anything (I also think this is to be expected with a blazer, which I'll in all likelihood be wearing with jeans or khakis rather than suit pants that sit at my waist).

I brought it back to the same tailor today, who is going to try letting out the bottom part of the skirt by the hips a bit to see if that helps. At the same time he is currently making adjustments on that first jacket, he is also altering a single vented jacket that I brought him: a thrift store find with enough room in the back and sides that the vent kicked out. He again recommended closing the vent when taking the jacket in. I'm less worried with this one about the bottom of the jacket spreading, since it's a BB jacket with less open quarters to start with.

That said, is closing the vents the usual course of action or the preferable option when aggressively taking in a jacket? Are there any other options? I figure I'll try to get a second opinion before I go Italian-ify every jacket I buy from now on! If it helps for context, I may have been buying the wrong jacket length: while I thought I was a 38R, the tailor recommended I purchase a 36L (sidenote: I'm a little afraid to size down because the shoulders may be too small for me, but my best option for purchase OTR given my body type is perhaps a topic for another thread). I apologize that I don't have pictures, but the tailor is currently making adjustments on that first jacket.

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:

ThomGault

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No, you're doing very in-depth alterations that I would totally avoid, not only for the poor results (pockets in wrong location), but also for cost (there's no way that all those alterations cost less than a properly-fitting jacket), not to mention style (vent-less jackets are a pretty extreme anachronistic abnormality.)
You can post pictures, but, really, I'd highly suggest you halt all alterations and reassess your options.
 

greggerspa

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No, you're doing very in-depth alterations that I would totally avoid, not only for the poor results (pockets in wrong location), but also for cost (there's no way that all those alterations cost less than a properly-fitting jacket), not to mention style (vent-less jackets are a pretty extreme anachronistic abnormality.)
You can post pictures, but, really, I'd highly suggest you halt all alterations and reassess your options.

Thanks for the quick reply. So the tailor is only charging ~$50, his usual price for waist suppression, and this particular jacket was a steal (I'm talking about $10) from the local thrift store. I'm afraid I've paid up front for the alterations I've just dropped off, but I will definitely hesitate before doing this with other jackets in the future, given your advice.
 

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