Us people eating like pigs?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by ernest, Apr 11, 2005.

  1. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    In "Farmer" families, yes.
     


  2. RJman

    RJman Posse Member Dubiously Honored

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    Oh bloody hell.
     


  3. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    If I saw someone eating a Hamburger sandwich with a knife and fork I would think that they were odd or trying to hard. It reminds me of the Seifeld episode when everyone started eating their snicker bars with a knife and fork.
     


  4. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    There was an interesting article -- I think in the NYT years ago -- that argued that the American way of switching silverware from one hand to the other was actually a "refinement" in that it included an extra step. The European method, which is a more efficient procedure, entirely was contrasted to this American method that was argued to be more civilized because it was more refined.
     


  5. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Senior member

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    And to be honest with you I could really give a fud..ge...it is the way I like to eat and so be it....my wife eats the same, and in my opinion it is to each his own, I do not really care to get my fingers greasy unless I do not have silver to choose from, the American way of swapping hands is so much more appeasing and less barbaric? Yet eating with the hands is much less barbaric, hello.....explain this.

    Secondly, who ever asks for a hamburger sandwich?
     


  6. RJman

    RJman Posse Member Dubiously Honored

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    Amen to all that.  Hamburger "sandwich" indeed.

    Also, dude, did you _mean_ to misspell "Pierpont"?
     


  7. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    I ask for hamburger sandwiches all the time, I didn't know they were called anything else. I'm not going to debate the virtues of eating sandwhiches with your hands or utensils. Eating one with a knife and fork simply looks silly to me.
    When my fingers get greasy I usually pick up a napkin.

    RJ:Yes the misspell was intentional.
    edit:added fork
     


  8. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    I don't know if you were attempting to respond to my message? Because if you were I don't think you understood the point.
     


  9. ernest

    ernest Senior member

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    Eating sandwiches with hands = normal

    Eating some food in your plate with hands = normal

    Making a sandwich with the chicken, tomatoes, vegetables, cheeses you have on the table when you are at somebody's home = odd
     


  10. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    on your plate. Like sur la table, n'est pas?
     


  11. jerrysfriend

    jerrysfriend Senior member

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    After 20+ trips to France, I nave noticed a few cultural differences. The sandwich difference seems to have startled Ernest.
    Only two sandwiches in France are fairly thick: the Croque Monsieur (and not always) and the Pan Bagna (a sort of tuna fish salad sandwich, with lettuce, from the Riviera). All of the other ones consist of a lightly buttered short baguette with a startlingly modest quantity of meat or cheese filling; never both and never lettuce, tomato, etc. The filing is less than 1/8" thick. The French are astonished (and probably disgusted) by the gigantic, overflowing USA sandwich. It was probably the first one he had ever seen.
    The French eat sandwiches with their hands, but not much else; I have seen them peal and eat bananas, oranges and apples with a knife and fork.
    Many French bathe less frequently than Americans (reasoning: too frequent showering washes off your healthy natural protective oils and dries your skin) but they would never eat from another's plate. They would be astonished to see a top restaurant bring a single dessert, to a couple, with two forks. They do share dishes, but they are always divided onto seperate plates.
    The French do not eat hot, cooked food for breakfast as the Americans and the British do; they nearly become ill even thinking of it. No eggs, bacon or sausage, etc., at breakfast. Only a large coffee with milk, croissant, roll and/or bread with butter or jelly (juice optional; rarely cheese or slices of cold meats).
    I have read that, as a rule, the worse a nation's cuisine is, the more elaborate the breakfasts. This certainly used to be true of Britain, but the food has gotten much better in recent years.
     


  12. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    While usually tasty, I've always found these very unfilling. Two for lunch is barely enough and I usually need another midday or my stomach starts growling (and I am 5'11", 165 lbs, and with a 32 inch waist - hardly a giant.) Explains why Frenchmen are thinner than most Americans, but also explains why most of them (at least most of the Parisians I know) have the physical endurance and strength of 10 year old girls (there are, of course, exceptions. I personally know an incredible French endurance athlete, and another Frenchman who is a terrific rockclimber.)

    The other stuff is just cosmetic cultural differences, imo. But I really believe that while Americans need to eat healthier and exercise more, so do the French need to eat heartier and exercise more.
     


  13. Andrew V.

    Andrew V. Senior member

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    In time in France I was shocked and amazed at how big and delicious and inexpensive the sandwiches were. You could easily find baguette sandwiches stuffed with all manner of cheeses, meats, veggies, etc. My favorites had names like "crudites-fromage" and "americano", which as I recall consisted of steak, melted cheese, and fries IN the sandwich. It was heaven.

    Of course that was in southern France. It's harder to find such great sandwiches in northern France.
     


  14. PHV

    PHV Senior member

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    (jpeirpont @ April 14 2005,23:00) I ask for hamburger sandwiches all the time, I didn't know they were called anything else. I'm not going to debate the virtues of eating sandwhiches with your hands or utensils. Eating one with a knife and simply looks silly to me. When my fingers get greasy I usually pick up a napkin. RJ:Yes the misspell was intentional.
    I agree. Â At least in the U.S. if you order certain things and then eat with a knife and fork it really does appear pretentious- an affectation.
    I disagree. The way some restaurants make a hamburger it would be a disaster to eat it with your hands. To keep your shirt clean you'd have to eat with a knife and fork. If I am in public in even a half decent place I prefer to eat with a knife and fork, especially if it New York style pizza.
     


  15. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    (CTGuy @ April 15 2005,10:26)
    I ask for hamburger sandwiches all the time, I didn't know they were called anything else. I'm not going to debate the virtues of eating sandwhiches with your hands or utensils. Eating one with a knife and simply looks silly to me. When my fingers get greasy I usually pick up a napkin. RJ:Yes the misspell was intentional.
    I agree. Â At least in the U.S. if you order certain things and then eat with a knife and fork it really does appear pretentious- an affectation.
    I disagree. The way some restaurants make a hamburger it would be a disaster to eat it with your hands. To keep your shirt clean you'd have to eat with a knife and fork. If I am in public in even a half decent place I prefer to eat with a knife and fork, especially if it New York style pizza.
    Pizza with a knife and fork? I, for one, would make fun of you for that. Who cares if your stupid shirt gets a little dirty.
     


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