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Recommend me a good dry iron or an iron a tailor would use

Tomasso

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Originally Posted by merkur
It sounds like steam irons are a bad idea in general with regard to mid/high-end clothing.
This is news to me.
 

speedster.8

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My last tailors use steam & vacuum tables with corresponding dry irons. Don't think you want to invest in that ... Massive installation with built in water & drainage as well as air compressor. But I don't see the issue with steam irons, for some materials it is always good to ad for instance a press cloth in between the iron and garment. But otherwise id make sure I iron at "safe" temperatures.
 

jefferyd

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Steam irons don't kill suits, people kill suits.

A steam iron is the best thing to have at home, but in the wrong hands (I think of an internet video someone here linked to) you can really wreck a suit. What I DO warn people against is taking a steamer to a suit- this is not the same thing at all!

I AM working on the post, before anyone mentions it, things just got busy around here post Biella.

I have two irons at home (I am a tailor)- one gravity-feed steam iron which is great but at a few hundred dollars is not cheap. I also got a Rowenta recently which I rather like. I'm dreaming of having a vacuum table at home but........
 

voxsartoria

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You can add to cart at the link. No coupon codes, though.


- B
 

Despos

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Originally Posted by voxsartoria


You can add to cart at the link. No coupon codes, though.


- B



Can never get a "deal" from you.
 

voxsartoria

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Originally Posted by Despos
Can never get a "deal" from you.

I'm trying to get my guy to like Golden Bale. He's not biting.


- B
 

Cary Grant

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Note on steam irons for anybody reading this thread that would rather not learn the hard way


1) Use distilled water... minerals in your tap water will eventually kill the iron and worse, heighten the potential to deposit stains on your clothing.

2) empty the iron thoroughly after each use.
 

gentleman amateur

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Originally Posted by jefferyd
Steam irons don't kill suits, people kill suits.

A steam iron is the best thing to have at home, but in the wrong hands (I think of an internet video someone here linked to) you can really wreck a suit. What I DO warn people against is taking a steamer to a suit- this is not the same thing at all!

I AM working on the post, before anyone mentions it, things just got busy around here post Biella.

I have two irons at home (I am a tailor)- one gravity-feed steam iron which is great but at a few hundred dollars is not cheap. I also got a Rowenta recently which I rather like. I'm dreaming of having a vacuum table at home but........



You have 2 steam irons at home, but do you use dry irons at work? Also, I guess it would be impossible or extraordinarily expensive to by a vacuum tube.
 

greyinla

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Is there any real advantage to using steam over a dry iron and a spray bottle/damp shirt/press cloth? And is it enough to go through the trouble of filling and emptying the iron daily? I've seen so many leaking and deposit-filled irons in hotels that I've always avoided using steam at home.
 

billiebob

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Originally Posted by Cary Grant
Note on steam irons for anybody reading this thread that would rather not learn the hard way


1) Use distilled water... minerals in your tap water will eventually kill the iron and worse, heighten the potential to deposit stains on your clothing.

2) empty the iron thoroughly after each use.



Rowenta specifically warns against using distilled water in their irons. I find this odd myself but it's true.
 

Cary Grant

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Originally Posted by billiebob
Rowenta specifically warns against using distilled water in their irons. I find this odd myself but it's true.

Interesting. Wonder why... Our water here, despite having a softener and filter, is quite hard and mineral laden... so I actually use a spray bottle and dru iron. Not doing so has killed any other iron.
 

scot

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distilled water + heat = a nice solvent for the interior of the iron. It will leach out the inside and gum up everything, eventually staining your clothing.

Most of the rowentas have a softener tablet in the unit as well, distilled water doesn't play nice with that. Normal water is fine and the softener will just keep everything in check unless you have extremely hard water.
 

Despos

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Originally Posted by greyinla
Is there any real advantage to using steam over a dry iron and a spray bottle/damp shirt/press cloth? And is it enough to go through the trouble of filling and emptying the iron daily? I've seen so many leaking and deposit-filled irons in hotels that I've always avoided using steam at home.

Steam iron is convenient. Push the button and you have steam. Sometimes you want a lot of steam and sometimes you want just a little bit of steam. That's when a dry iron, spray bottle and press cloth are best. Gives you some control. What's missing from most irons available to the public is weight. The heavier the iron, the better.
 

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