Luxuries you can live without

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Ambulance Chaser, Feb 23, 2005.

  1. cuffthis

    cuffthis Senior member

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    Wine Glasses - major guilty. At Chateau Cuffthis, we probably break more Riedel glasses each year than most people buy (sob). We host at least 2 wine dinners a month. It's amazing how many glasses you have to clean the next day. 12 people x 4-6 different glasses each, plus water glasses. [​IMG]
     
  2. joshuam

    joshuam Member

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    Yes, but if you buy into the article you and I are quetionable because we are spending a premium on a good that has to be consumed to be enjoyed (oh no.). Unless you are holding onto bottles for appreciation, what is the point. I think she is missing the bit about enjoyment of life and sometimes these things are worth it if it brings a bit of happiness, even on the most primal level. Cuffthis: So when are Luc and I coming over for a bacchanal? We can celebrate our superfluous lives  [​IMG]. Also, (not to thread-drift) do you still need ideas for restaurants in Orlando? I saw your post on the wine boards but figured you probably hang out here more. Let me know, I lived there for five years before moving down here to Miami.
     
  3. topcatny

    topcatny Senior member

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    I agree with this as well. Lately I have been walking around our house noticing all the things we never use, that are just taking up space. We keep going back to the best quality stuff we have, whether it be towels, sheets, pots, etc. and using those things repeatedly. I just did a major reduction to my wardrobe eliminating things I never wear, now I want to do the same for the rest of my life.
     
  4. spatten

    spatten Senior member

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    As someone who is fiscally iresponsible by nature - but working hard at it (and making good progress) I recognize the merit in an article like this. There are many people who can use a wakeup call like this article.

    However, adopting an austere lifestyle - which is what the article seems to tacitly suggests - is probably not the right answer either.

    I think the attitude adopted by many members of this site - purchasing high quality goods at reasonable prices - goes a long way to the right answer.
     
  5. T4phage

    T4phage Senior member

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    Originally posted by Luc-Emmanuel:
    hmmm, I like cooking and eating too, but civet? [​IMG] What does that mongoose taste like? What about the musk glands?
     
  6. hermes

    hermes Senior member

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    well i totally disagree on the point about chocolate

    as a self confessed chocoholic, there is a big difference between premium hand made chocolate from quality ingredients and a hershey bar (godiva is mass manufactured crap in my book, more marketing than great chocolate)

    but i digress
     
  7. Jill

    Jill Senior member

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    Sheets ~ oh so very guilty, and yes, I CAN tell the difference.
     
  8. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    Sneakers, jeans, an t-shirts. Not that I actually need anymore of the above. Well, these things do need to be replaced occasionally; but Corpus and Nudie and Da'mage jeans are not things that anyone absolutely needs, nor are two dozen pairs of sneakers. But I pay my bills (no debt, really) and am trying to build up some savings on a remarkably small income (especially given the cost of living in Cambridge.)
     
  9. gorgekko

    gorgekko Senior member

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    Although I disagree with the politics of the movie, Fight Club's Tyler Durden was right when he said, "The things you own end up owning you." I did the same thing myself and was astounded by the amount stuff I own. Stuff everywhere. Stuff I don't even use. And for what? I didn't own the stuff, it owned me because it still had to be cared for even if I didn't use it. Lately I've been trying to pare down the stuff I have and avoid buying new stuff (well, failing slightly but doing well for the most part). I don't need fancy pots or omelette pans...the ones I have do the job quite well. A bit off topic I guess but I needed to rant.
     
  10. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (topcatny @ Feb. 23 2005,11:40) I agree with this as well. Â Lately I have been walking around our house noticing all the things we never use, that are just taking up space. Â We keep going back to the best quality stuff we have, whether it be towels, sheets, pots, etc. and using those things repeatedly. Â I just did a major reduction to my wardrobe eliminating things I never wear, now I want to do the same for the rest of my life.
    Although I disagree with the politics of the movie, Fight Club's Tyler Durden was right when he said, "The things you own end up owning you." I did the same thing myself and was astounded by the amount stuff I own. Stuff everywhere. Stuff I don't even use. And for what? I didn't own the stuff, it owned me because it still had to be cared for even if I didn't use it. Lately I've been trying to pare down the stuff I have and avoid buying new stuff (well, failing slightly but doing well for the most part). I don't need fancy pots or omelette pans...the ones I have do the job quite well. A bit off topic I guess but I needed to rant.
    I knew a couple, back about 10 years ago, who were dentists, they lived in a high rise building in down town tel aviv that had offices on the lower floors, and apartments on the lower floors. they rented an apartment, and worked in a clinic in the same building. they didn't have any kitchen stuff, they would always eat out, and they didn't have much furnature, only a futon. every six months to a year, they would take off for 6 months to a year of travel. they were in their mid thirties at the time, and had been doing this since getting out of school. they had almost no possetions what so ever. at the time, I thought this was the coolest thing in the world. now, it strikes me as going way to far, but a good general idea.
     
  11. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    "Watches: Now they're "timepieces, but it's no longer about telling the time. For about $20, you can buy a watch with a quartz movement that won't lose a minute in the next 10,000 years. But even without the optional encrustation of diamonds, you'll still fork over $7,500 and up for a Rolex President or pay a couple hundred thousand for a Cartier watch. And we're still talking about a plain-looking gold watch -- not something Liberace would have worn."

    Ah, no. A 18kt YG Rolex prez is close to $20,000 retail and there is only three or four Cartiers that cost a few hundred thousand (not including the diamond encrusted quartz watches with no WIS would ever label "timepiece"). "Plain looking"? Sure, if you don't understand what a minute repeater is, its "plain looking" to you, at least from the dial side, but it's the movement that counts.

    Jon.
     
  12. justlurkingthanks

    justlurkingthanks Senior member

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    This is an effective article because it contains at least a few things, if not most of the things, that the reader can feel superior about.

    Reader: "She doesn't know what she's talking about. I have a Rolex that will appreciate in value. But I would never be so foolish as to get a $600 bathrobe."

    This article's argument has always been in existence. But where would we be without the luxuries, or the leading edge of consumerism? These items become the standards and we stand on that to reach even higher. That's America, damn it.


    But I still find this story a good reminder to hold onto a sense of perspective. BTW, that photo indicates Ms. Dunleavy needs to ratchet up her spending in the hair care aisle.
     
  13. Charles Rogers

    Charles Rogers Senior member

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    Where do you get your Nudie and Corpus?
     
  14. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    Not all Rolexes will appreciate in value however, thinking that they will is foolish. However, the value of a Rolex will last much longer than that of a bathrobe. Just try selling a used bathrobe for $600.

    It's kind of like the Bijan suit for $14k and change, its on sale for $700, hardly a spitting image of the original retail price. Whereas a $4000 watch might be worth only $2500 if you try to sell it, but it's a better percentage than the Bijan suit, or a Bathrobe; less money is lost.

    Jon.
     
  15. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (justlurkingthanks @ Feb. 23 2005,13:27) This is an effective article because it contains at least a few things, if not most of the things, that the reader can feel superior about. Reader: "She doesn't know what she's talking about. I have a Rolex that will appreciate in value. But I would never be so foolish as to get a $600 bathrobe." This article's argument has always been in existence. But where would we be without the luxuries, or the leading edge of consumerism? These items become the standards and we stand on that to reach even higher. That's America, damn it. But I still find this story a good reminder to hold onto a sense of perspective. BTW, that photo indicates Ms. Dunleavy needs to ratchet up her spending in the hair care aisle.
    Not all Rolexes will appreciate in value however, thinking that they will is foolish. However, the value of a Rolex will last much longer than that of a bathrobe. Just try selling a used bathrobe for $600. It's kind of like the Bijan suit for $14k and change, its on sale for $700, hardly a spitting image of the original retail price. Whereas a $4000 watch might be worth only $2500 if you try to sell it, but it's a better percentage than the Bijan suit, or a Bathrobe; less money is lost. Jon.
    I had two bathrobes made, silk inside, cashmere outside, custom, for about $80 a piece a few years ago in india (kachins). they will probrably be all the bathrobes that I need for the rest of my life. a little luxury at a very little price.
     

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