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Has anyone been on an african safari?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by GQgeek, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. hoozah

    hoozah Senior member

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    Somalians are crazy. They are all over my city. Last year one slit the throats of these 17 year old twin brothers.
     
  2. bullethead

    bullethead Senior member

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    Last summer my girlfriend and I went to S Africa for roughly two weeks. We flew into Johannesburg, renting a car and driving to Kruger, which was simply awesome. I felt like a kid in Disneyworld for the first time. From there, we drove the garden route to cape town, spending the night in four towns. We drove roughly 2200 miles though some very rural areas and experienced no trouble whatsoever.
     
  3. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Senior member

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    Any thoughts on what camera to bring? I have a Canon ELPH P&S that has served me well on past overseas trips, but I think I may want to upgrade to a better camera for this trip. I was initially looking at DSLRs, but now I'm leaning toward a superzoom -- cheaper, lighter, and without the hassle of bringing/changing lenses. How about binoculars? A must bring?
     
  4. bullethead

    bullethead Senior member

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    i'm not a big camera guy-i drove while my girlfriend shot. I would make sure you're covered in the zoom dept. I purchased binoculars for the trip and glad i did-very useful when you stumble upon something interesting. August, btw, is considered the best time to go-less foliage makes for easier viewing.
     
  5. Fuuma

    Fuuma Senior member

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    People tend to favour something that zooms a lot, binoculars are nice if you don't have a camera in your hands otherwise who cares. Don't spend your whole trip looking through the lense of a camera, take a few pics but experience the place a lot.
     
  6. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    In my experience, 90% of the time, you'll just be watching what's going on but the other 10% you'll need a strong zoom (or binos) to see some distant scenes/animals. Doesn't really make a difference to me if you're looking at it through a viewfinder or binoculars - but you wouldn't want to miss some of these things.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2012
  7. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    You don't HAVE to kill stuff. You can just watch the animals.


    A fast 200mm zoom is absolute minimum imo, preferably with a 1.4x teleconverter to get a bit closer. For wildlife, photographers usually recommend 300mm or more, but those lenses are incredibly expensive. First figure out what system you're going to go with (canon/nikon, full frame or not, etc) and if you're really into photography and want good close-ups, you can probably find a place to rent a lens in the country, assuming you're not going to shell out 5-10k for a long enough zoom. I'd go with a long lens and not bother with binoculars. You can only carry so much stuff.

    You probably want something with good image stabilization too since you may be shooting from a 4x4. The higher end lenses have it in the canon/nikon world. Olympus does it in-body.
     
  8. yjeezle

    yjeezle Senior member

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    how much is it to go big game hunting in africa?
     
  9. deandbn

    deandbn Senior member

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    Probably $2000 to get here and back, about $2000-$5000 for hotels and things. Then if you want to shoot a lion probably about $100,000
     
  10. deandbn

    deandbn Senior member

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    Yeah I agree with you GQ - shoot the animals with a big bore camera...
     
  11. GQgeek

    GQgeek Senior member

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    100k? Is that for a permit or something? I've never had any interest in shooting anything (with a gun).
     
  12. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    IIRC from what our guides were telling us, the reserves raise a lot of the money needed to run and maintain the parks with those very high hunting prices.
     
  13. deandbn

    deandbn Senior member

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    Yes that would be the kinda price for a Lion, lesser animals command lesser fees though.



    Sorry GDL it does not work like that unfortunately, ....

    The game park's do not ever allow commercial hunting, it is illegal. The only purpose of these game reserves is to preserve the wildlife. Culling is possible at times, but only done by game rangers, and as part of their jobs, not for profit. However there is a lot of illegal theft, bribery, corruption, and poaching going on where the animals are stolen and killed for meat or aphrodisiacs, like rhino horn. Crocodile skin for belts and shoes and handbags.

    The only places that are legally allowed to supply private game hunting, are the private game farms. Here they put the animal concerned in a fenced off area so it cannot run too far, sedate it to an extent. This provides and almost perfect setting for the typical overweight american big game hunter to sit in relative comfort in a jeep/landrover and kill a sedated animal at fairly close range, because they normally cannot aim very well, and also, they cannot hold a rifle up to aim and shoot for very long because their un-exercised ams begin shaking under the weight of the rifle and it just would not do to have the hunter break a sweat on his brow, have pulled arm muscles, or (god forbid) have to run after the animal after paying $100,000 for the privilege. It has to by nature be quick clean professional and efficient.

    Oh, and yes, 100k is for the permit or something. More something than permit i think, something for bribery and corruption. But yes, they call it a permit, it just sounds better. Permit, I think I like that word. It is corruption money and buys another couple of mercedes benz. I mean you have never found anything that is not corrupt in africa have you?

    Fascinating stuff, Africa.... :nodding:
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2012
  14. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Well, when we were in the Selous in Tanzania, our lodge was close to a game reserve and the guides explained that a portion of the reserve was fenced off for hunting and that it was highly controlled as to which animals are available to hunt and when, and that the proceeds were used to fund the non-hunting part of the reserve. I don't know if that gaming reserve was private but it didn't sound like it. Maybe there are private hunting operators / concessions for hunting and the point is that what they pay for concessions helps fund the overall reserve? Not sure exactly.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2012
  15. deandbn

    deandbn Senior member

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    Sorry I should have said i was talking about South Africa, which is a lot more formalized than Tanzania which is in deepest darkest Africa.
    But i would bet my bottom dollar that it does not cost that much there, it is not as comfortable / professional, and that it is totally corrupt.

    Show me da money!!

    hehe, Oh and US Dollars only..:nodding:
     
  16. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Senior member

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    I've just returned from my Kenyan safari. It was wonderful. I visited Amboseli National Park, Lake Nakuru National Park, and Masai Mara National Reserve (the portion of the Serengeti in Kenya). The Great Migration had just taken place, and Masai Mara was crawling with a mind boggling number of wildebeest and zebra. I also spotted four out of the "Big Five" (didn't see the elusive leopard), giraffes, hippos, crocodiles, several species of gazelles and birds, and a pregnant cheetah. I highly recommend a safari to anyone with an interest in outdoors and/or animals.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2012

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