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Bar Lacing of Shoes

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by knezz, Feb 25, 2012.

  1. knezz

    knezz Well-Known Member

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    When bar lacing my shoes I get this - notice the lacing under the bars.
    [​IMG]


    Notice this - no lacing under the bars.
    [​IMG]

    Like the 2nd photo my shoes don't meet.

    Is the latter of the two images a prop photo or can this be done.?
     
  2. Archivist

    Archivist Well-Known Member

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    Ian's shoelace site
    There are various ways to tie a bar or straight lace. Note in the pictures, your shoes have 5 pairs of eyelets, and the other photo have 6.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2012
  3. pgmetcalf

    pgmetcalf Well-Known Member

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    I used to straight lace my shoes. They look good but they are awkward and not very comfortable. Not worth the hassle in my opinion
     
  4. Journeyman

    Journeyman Well-Known Member

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    I think that the second pair would be using either of these techniques, from Ian's shoelace site:

    - Straight (bar) lacing; or

    - Straight (easy) lacing.

    I use the former technique and I like it - the shoes are more comfortable over the top of my feet, the "v" of the laces is a bit closer together, and it looks cleaner.
     
  5. knezz

    knezz Well-Known Member

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    As for tigtening when on,lostening when taking off and wearing across the day how do striaght laces fare?
     
  6. Journeyman

    Journeyman Well-Known Member

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    I think that it is actually easier than the traditional lacing technique, although other people may have differing opinions. I suppose that it is just a tiny bit more difficult to pull your laces really tight across the top of your foot but the method feels quite a bit more comfortable to me. They are easy to take off and don't loosen appreciably during the day - I haven't noticed any difference from the usual technique.
     
  7. recondite

    recondite Well-Known Member

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    If your shoes fit properly over your instep, you never see the gap, and therefore the crossed laces, when your Oxfords or Balmorals are laced tight.

    That being said, follow the lacing guides above and find your own way. One's Oxford and Balmoral styled shoes and boots only have a single diagonal lacing under the vamp from bottom (toe end) to top (ankle end) and not all of that criss-crossing seen in your pictures below. Maybe your would prefer that method?

    There are great benefits to being "straight-laced" not limited to elegance, but only if your shoes fit properly to start.

     
  8. ShelterIslandMike

    ShelterIslandMike Well-Known Member

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    I do not agree that properly fitted shoes are laced without a gap. A gap is acceptable and does not suggest an ill-fitting shoe.
     
  9. Journeyman

    Journeyman Well-Known Member

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    I think that it's a bit of a vexed issue. Some people say "no gap" whilst others say "gap".

    As far as I'm aware, there are two main gap arguments - firstly, that it's not a problem and only overly-obsessive people worry about such things; and secondly, that new shoes should have a bit of a "v" or gap as the leather will stretch as the shoes are worn and the gap will close up a bit, so if you have no gap when the shoes are new, they will later become too loose as the leather stretches and wears in.
     
  10. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    A properly fitted and tied oxford should show no gap or at least minimal gap.

    When new a wee bit of gap might be acceptable as most shoes do stretch a bit upon wearing.
     
  11. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  12. Journeyman

    Journeyman Well-Known Member

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    Also, bear in mind that some shoemakers - particularly English ones, it seems - deliberately have the "v" widen a bit up towards the top of the laces. I've noticed this on my C&Js, my Sargents and my Edward Greens, and it is just the way that they are cut.
     
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