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Pantherella sock prices?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by SylvesterPennoyer, Feb 10, 2005.

  1. esquire.

    esquire. Well-Known Member

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    What's so special about Pantherella socks, and why are they so much better than other socks? I couldn't tell the difference at all.
     
  2. hermes

    hermes Well-Known Member

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    FB is likely filene's basement

    i often find that the nm last calls outlets also carry pantherella and with their additional 20% off days on socks from time to time, the price comes down to $4-5 a pair, comparible to marshall's
     
  3. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    since you asked, retail prices in different locations are impacted by a number of things, and the difference between london high street and a US mall is an excellent example

    you start off with the basic cost of the goods sold - what it costs to manufacture the goods. lets say $1. add to that what it costs to transport to the store - lets say that it costs $0.01 to transport to the store in england (for an english made sock) but $0.011 to transport to the US. add to that tarrifs zero in the case of UK, but (I believe) zero in the case of a uk testile import to the US. now, overhead of the HQ, lets say $0.30 identical for each. now, overhead for the local company - here is where the difference starts - the US has some of the leanest retail corporations in the world, very good at keeping overhead down. now you are adding say $0.20 in the US, but $0.40 in the UK. now, overhead of the shop - in the US the retail employees are paid low wages with little or no benifits, not so in the UK. say $0.20 in the US, $0.50 in London (take into account rent, utilities, cost of labor, etc.) now add sales tax - 4-6% in the US, as opposed to VAT in UK of 17%. all of this adds up. the biggest differences, of course, are in the pay scale and the level of benifits for the empoyees.
     
  4. topcatny

    topcatny Well-Known Member

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    I also picked up a number of pairs of these at marshalls (along with some Donna Karan 100% cashmere for $7).
    So far they cashmere blend socks haven't shrunk at all. I haven't worn the 100% cotton ones yet. They fit me perfect but I am a size 13.
     
  5. chorse123

    chorse123 Well-Known Member

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    (esquire. @ Feb. 10 2005,12:45) chorehose: Could you please go into more detail why consumer goods would be more expensive in England than America, if we are essentially talking about the same goods produced by the same manufacturer. I wonder if we are comparing apples to oranges. We can't compare Marshall's price to the ones in England unless there are also these same stores in London or some other types of discount retailers. And, from my understanding, the prices in Europe are generally higher than those in America but they are also higher in quailty. A lot of the junk sold here in America wouldn't be bought by Europeans. If anything, you'd think the socks would be more expensive in America due to shipping and import costs, etc...
    since you asked, retail prices in different locations are impacted by a number of things, and the difference between london high street and a US mall is an excellent example you start off with the basic cost of the goods sold - what it costs to manufacture the goods. lets say $1. add to that what it costs to transport to the store - lets say that it costs $0.01 to transport to the store in england (for an english made sock) but $0.011 to transport to the US. add to that tarrifs zero in the case of UK, but (I believe) zero in the case of a uk testile import to the US. now, overhead of the HQ, lets say $0.30 identical for each. now, overhead for the local company - here is where the difference starts - the US has some of the leanest retail corporations in the world, very good at keeping overhead down. now you are adding say $0.20 in the US, but $0.40 in the UK. now, overhead of the shop - in the US the retail employees are paid low wages with little or no benifits, not so in the UK. say $0.20 in the US, $0.50 in London (take into account rent, utilities, cost of labor, etc.) now add sales tax - 4-6% in the US, as opposed to VAT in UK of 17%. all of this adds up. the biggest differences, of course, are in the pay scale and the level of benifits for the empoyees.
    Globetrotter nailed it. Higher labor costs, higher rents, VAT. I'd say that a lot of retailers push lower quality garments in an effort to balance these costs.
     
  6. esquire.

    esquire. Well-Known Member

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    If all this is true, then one would think that the English market would be ripe for more efficient multinational corporations which would be able to slash costs. Hasn't Walmart already moved in?

    And, are these high labor costs mandated by the government? I thought that Thatcher had curtailed much of labor's power in the 80s.
     
  7. VMan

    VMan Well-Known Member

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    My local Marshalls/TJ Maxx also had some Pantherella Cashmere blend socks for $4 on clearance, and Donna Karan (made in Italy) 100% cashmere for $5 on clearance. Nice colors, too - heather gray, charcoal, black, tan.

    I didn't pick them up because they were hand wash only, and they would probably get mixed in with my others and thrown in the dryer on accident. Nice socks at good prices, though.
     
  8. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    this is exactly why you get french farmers burning mcdonalds - because where US retailers cast their eye, they can devestate the competition. but you still have laws that protect the local retailers, or at least the systems that you use, which is why you get brits and europopeans who travel in order to shop at the same shops they have at home, just at lower prices.
     
  9. j

    j Well-Known Member

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    Don't worry about the warnings, I machine wash and dry (low heat of course) my cashmere socks, no problems. Pick some up, they are nice.

    There are also some random Italian cashmere socks there, which I would avoid. The ones with the black "cashmere blend" sticker around them. More sheerness problems.
     

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