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The Significant Others of MC - Page 3

post #31 of 52
My wife occasionally gives me a hard time about the fact that my closet is about three times bigger than hers. But mostly she's in favor of me dressing well - a nice suit is a real turn on for her biggrin.gif

Also, I have actually gotten her to start dressing nicer and buying higher quality clothes (I tend to do most laundry and ironing, so I really appreciate not having the really cheap and crappy clothes around anymore, it's a nightmare to deal with). But I was actually surprised how hard it is to find high quality women's clothing, even expensive "designer brands" tend to use a lot of polyester and other crap in their clothes.
post #32 of 52
My girlfriend is into emo guys--no joke. So, tight, black jeans and black T-shirts for her! frown.gif I like wearing SCs a lot with ties which I don't think she's into. She regularly makes body language/says, that I am over-dressing. She was shocked, when I told her I wanted, to buy a £700+ suit reduced to £280! I thought it was a steal, but she doesn't understand fabric/cut/etc. When I say, 'ergh, polyester,' she rolls her eyes. She doesn't like my fedora, either, although I'm sure some of you wouldn't, either! tongue.gif She's pretty shocked, that I spend ~£200 on shoes--some of you spend a lot more!

I have told her a couple of times, to give me a break on my personal taste, and to not tell me what I can and cannot do--respectfully, of course. I like what she wears, most of the time, but she owns individual pieces, that I dislike, but I never tell her so. I wish she could reciprocate, but I think there is some code, that says, because it's not mainstream, criticism is more acceptable (her to me).

I wonder, what do you guys think about this? Is bad fashion from the social norm more likely, to not get looked down upon than tailored items?
post #33 of 52
Speaking as a guy in my 50s who has always tried to dress well like my Dad did before me I would have to say I have never heard anything but complements from women when you dress well.

In fact I have seen women get defensive and supportive of me if some slob comments sarcastically that you look well dressed.

One of my colleagues at a former workplace commented at the farewell morning tea that I had tried to raise the sartorial tone of the place and had left it a bit better for my passing.

I have concluded that in the female psyche well dressed is seen as a sign of substance. Like you have some individualism/pride in yourself and desire to not be part of the mob and that is meritorious.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JapanAlex01 View Post

but I think there is some code, that says, because it's not mainstream, criticism is more acceptable (her to me). I wonder, what do you guys think about this? Is bad fashion from the social norm more likely, to not get looked down upon than tailored items?

This is the dividing line for people who want to dress their own way. You have to cope with the mentality and be strong enough to withstand it for you own individuality.
post #34 of 52
Some women like me in an ivory suit; others in a purple safari jacket; others still in a sober suit and a flamboyant shirt-tie combination

Similarly, some like me fully bearded; most others prefer the clean shaven version

Summary: I've an easier time telling women I'm a Doctor Who fan than working out what effect my clothes have on them. London is a different world
post #35 of 52
My wife gives me a hard time about my buying clothes despite her closet still being much larger than mine, but she appreciates the way I dress, always asking if anyone complimented me at work. No one ever does, however, except when I wore green pants under my academic robes at graduation and the Chancellor remarked upon it while I hooded my graduates.
post #36 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post


some thoughts:
1. Dressing inappropriately formal (and I realise some people can get away with it more than others) makes people uncomfortable. It shouldn't, but it does.
2. Dressing casually is not dressing like a slob. I'm not saying you should buy designer sweatpants, because I don't buy into that, but I think in a modern world someone who wears tailored clothing exclusively is likely to be living in their own hobby. Nothing wrong with that.
3. Beware of women comments such as "Channing Tatum has such nice, relaxed style". Read: he's extremely good looking.
4. and yeah, what Bounder said about different people having different tastes, and also making sure you're comfortable in your clothes.
I don't really care what my girlfriend thinks about the clothes I wear, unless we're going to a special event in which she wants us to be turned out in a certain way. Yeah, it looks lame and high-schooley when she picks out a tie to go with her dress, but I don't mind a bit of kitsch if it makes her happy.

great post.

 

Re #1: My girlfriend pokes at some of my more bold style choices (e.g., AE Strands). That said, I get compliments on some styles. I usually dress in one of three ways: (1) suit & tie; (2) jeans, (cowboy) boots, and white tshirt; and (3) stereotypical mid-twenties dude. She is always fine w/#3, generally dislikes #2, and sometimes likes #1. I won't wake up and put on a suit to go shop at walmart. That said, I went to dinner w/her and her folks (they were in town recently), and she told me to meet them at X after I change from work. I wear a suit to work. However, I understand that the place we went to was _not_ a suit place ($7 "steak" buffet thing? gag me). Thus, I put on my jeans and boots, which were totally appropriate for that joint. haha

 

Re #2: I dress like a "slob" for working around the house. Bonus: when I use power tools and look like hell and hurt like hell, gf is most turned on. I was up in our tree cutting off dead limbs w/a chainsaw and had scratches on my leg w/a little blood trickling down, and she was super turned on. *shrug*. Women are weird. If I ever tried to understand why/how women are crazy, I'd go crazy myself; I've learned to STFU and just go w/it.

 

Re #3: Se my "women are crazy" comment.

 

Re #4: if you're part of a couple, it seems appropriate to match.

post #37 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrAz3D View Post

Re #4: if you're part of a couple, it seems appropriate to match.

Not really.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ5t4mKsneUkHTVibog0Rp5NjnbVxPmE_suY_I63kNM8lgIxL9yZw
post #38 of 52
it's kinda inappropriate but I'm willing to sacrifice that if she enjoys it.
post #39 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrAz3D View Post

great post.

Re #2: I dress like a "slob" for working around the house. Bonus: when I use power tools and look like hell and hurt like hell, gf is most turned on. I was up in our tree cutting off dead limbs w/a chainsaw and had scratches on my leg w/a little blood trickling down, and she was super turned on.

For a moment there I thought she was going to have a Dracula moment....
post #40 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

it's kinda inappropriate but I'm willing to sacrifice that if she enjoys it.

+1, You can either be right, or your can be happy.
post #41 of 52
I'm in my early/mid twenties and all of my male friends, no matter if still in university or already a professional, no matter if they are (going to be) a lawyer, doctor, banker, engineer or graphics designer, dress in sneakers, jeans, occasional chinos and t-shirts in their spare time.
Also, Germans are most likely the worst dressers of the world in general.
So, yes, I stand out a lot and I am not even wearing suits or SC.

Last weekend for example I attended a charity event at a racecourse.
Friends of mine performed with their band at the stage that was set up to attract younger people to the event.
It was a lovely summersday and I was wearing a light blue OCBD, plain front chinos in stone, navy boat shoes, a vintage dress watch with mid brown leather strap and tortoise sunglasses.
I received tons of compliments from both my friends as well as strangers.
A female friend of mine said she thought I looked like I would own that place/the racecourse, which is kind of ridicolous given the casualness in MC terms, but I embraced it with a grin.
I was also very pleased with the reaction to it by the girlfriend of a friend of mine, who said she doesn't know any other from me and that she already tried to point my style out to her boyfriend, but that she has not yet been sucessful to make him change.

One thing I have to agree on is there are plenty of women who feel uncomfortable if they think they are underdressed compared to a male in their environment.
What I like about it is if you have a reputation for being more well dressed than others they will automatically dress up according to what they expect to be your grade of formality and I really enjoy the looks of a woman that chose her outfit with care.
post #42 of 52
I am in my early 20s, luckily I got friends which understands my dressing taste, most of my friends dressed in preppy style, so no problem there.

For women, I found they neither interested or annoyed by my clothes, there are girls who likes me and being nice to me, also there are girls who hates me and never talk to me.

Perhaps I am just who I am, my clothes does't add anything to my attire.

I find myself look weird to dress in the norm teenager mode, as my ex also agrees.

However, when I am back in Hometown, I find it hard to dress nice, mainly due to the weather.
post #43 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrAz3D View Post

Re #4: if you're part of a couple, it seems appropriate to match.

It's not really appropriate and you have to be careful with this. You are not a chihuahua and your SO is not Paris Hilton.

And women are often conflicted about this. At a social gathering, they don't really want you to be "cute". What they want is to make their friends just slightly envious. There are several ways to do this apart from demonstrating that they can make you do tricks.
post #44 of 52
My situation is somewhat different than most of the other posters, both as I am much older than most of them (I am sliding quickly into my latter 50's), and that my SO is also a man.

My SO very much appreciates my sense of style, and appreciates also any insight that I have that could improve his own sense of style.

I agree with the posters who note that, sartorially, one should "let the punishment fit the crime", i.e. wear something that is appropriately dressy or casual, depending on the occasion. (I will note, however, that people today have a much reduced sense of "occasion" - if I'm having dinner in a restaurant where I am spending upwards of $100/person for a meal, I will dress more formally for that then when I'm eating at my local diner - others do not.)
post #45 of 52
You don't want to "match," but relatively equal levels of formality is good. It can be awkward if you're trying to go out in a jacket and tie and your wife is wearing jeans and a tshirt. They don't tend to like that.


I got out of grad school a few years earlier than my wife and frequently got asked "Why are you so dressed up?" By science grad school standards, a button-up shirt is "dressed up." I'd come home from work, take off my jacket and tie, roll up my sleeves, and still be vastly overdressed by her standards if we happened to go out to the store or whatever. We've since equilibrated to a more harmonious level.
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