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Sartorial London: The Official Thread (UPDATED 9/6/2012) - Page 4

post #46 of 111

Foo,

 

Its cool to check out any SR tailor, even if you're not looking to place a bespoke order. As Manton said, they're very retail-oriented and used to people rolling in just to buy a tie or square. A+S is very good about giving a full tour even if you're just a walk-in, and the people at Poole, W&J, and Dege are very friendly. Gieves' store is just beautiful. And don't forget all the adjoining streets that house the smaller firms - I would recommend stopping by both Meyer & Mortimer (Sackville) and Hayward (Mount).

 

Be sure to stop by the Arcades - Cleverley, Santa Maria Novella, Benson & Clegg etc. are all there. And Budd should be a definite stop - really is a fantastic little store. On the more casual front, I would suggest checking out Albam.

 

P.S. - An English tailor recently told me that Cifonelli is opening a London outpost on Sackville. Anyone know about this?

post #47 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

No prob--selfishly, I needed some suggestions, so I thought it would make sense to turn it into a mainstay guide for everyone.
If people figure out a Top Three Must Visits, I'll drop in, take photos, write up some articles, etc. TITC could use some content.

My top 3:

1) James Smith Umbrellas. No where else have I found an umbrella company that will cut an umbrella to your height, put on a metal tip and have it ready in an hour. I recall you had trouble convincing Talarico to make a bespoke idea you had. The umbrella I have is, ironically, made in Italy and perhaps by Talarico. The mechanism seems similar. Perhaps Smiths can make (or get Talarico to make) what you had in mind.

Note the mechanism looks like a Talarico.
1000x500px-LL-a0d33000_cherrybark3.jpg

2) Budd. Only place I found which carries sized black grosgrain bow ties. They weren't on display. I wonder what other unique objects they might have squirreled away. I haven't been since their renovation.

3) Drakes. IIRC their bespoke service is at no additional upcharge (including cashmere). Not a bad deal if you see something you like.

Alternate 3) W. Bills. Which I believe is on your list anyway.
post #48 of 111

Oh, and as silly and touristy as this sounds, go check out Harrods. They have a ton of small concessions within the store, many of which carry exclusive-to-Harrods merchandise. The store is beautiful as well.

post #49 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace Tilley View Post

Oh, and as silly and touristy as this sounds, go check out Harrods. They have a ton of small concessions within the store, many of which carry exclusive-to-Harrods merchandise. The store is beautiful as well.

I bought my first detached collar shirts at Harrods many years ago during my Toff phase.
In addition to fashion and/or style, Harrods is a Mecca for gustatory excess.
Check out the Food Halls, The only thing that comes close (and with a different
feel) is the Public Market on Granville Island, Vancouver, BC. or the Central
Market Budapest:

http://www.bing.com/travel/content/search?q=London%3A%20Harrod's%20Food%20Halls
post #50 of 111
Yes Harrod's menswear dept is surprisingly good, though I'm not sure it will have much for Foo. The food halls are stunning.

I like Poorsod's list too.

Edit -

The transmod thread got me wondering about dim sum in London...
Edited by E,TF - 8/4/12 at 6:30am
post #51 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eustace Tilley View Post

P.S. - An English tailor recently told me that Cifonelli is opening a London outpost on Sackville. Anyone know about this?

interesting, if so perfect for lasbar.

although i really like rue marbeuf so would rather go to paris if in london.

i can ask at my next fitting....
post #52 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Foo:
Since you mentioned writing this up, I think it would be a great project to see if you can sort through some of things that make English bespoke and Savile Row in particular different from what you have seen in Italy. I don't think you will have enough time to really get the English "way" in a short visit, but consider at least two things - the approach to style and the relationship with their customers and also the way things are made. By the latter, I am thinking of the importance of a central location and the way that has been driven by and drives the outworker system and the trimming and cloth merchant relationships including the fluidity with which cutters move from house to house (Personally, I find it interesting to note how much I like the work of Michael Skinner and cutters he has trained, but their other stylistic family trees you could fllow). Also the way the English have semi-industrialized an individualized hand-work driven craft. I think that brought benefits to both the customer and the tailors. The latter is also, I am sure, a response to the way Savile Row became, first, the tailoring destination for the civilized and civilizing world and then an export product where they exported themselves via the traveling tailor system.

Yes, I think that would very interesting. We'll see how much I really get to observe, though. I don't want to pry too much; also my wife will be with me and I cannot eat up too much time talking clothes.

Huntsman and W. Bill sound like good contenders. In fact, W. Bill is a must for me--I am determined to find a plain, large scale shepherd check tweed.

My hesitation with shoemakers is that I am very poorly versed in shoes. I don't think I could really make very helpful commentary.

What about umbrellas? I'm hearing a lot of support for James Smith. What about Brigg? If I had to pick, which one?
post #53 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

What about umbrellas? I'm hearing a lot of support for James Smith. What about Brigg? If I had to pick, which one?

At stop at (Swaine Adeney) Brigg is a must, especially because it is on St James's but buy a JS Smith brolly. While on St James's, stop over at JJ Fox and smoke a proper cigar.
post #54 of 111
Not much to add, a lot already covered but I would visit all the shoes shops on Jermyn St and most shirtmakers, again for accessories.

On the dinner front, not far from Saville Row, Pollen Street Social is a favourite of mine. For a grand Italian lunch, would recommend Apsleys at the Lanesborough, or if you miss some Neapolitan food, must head down to Donna Margherita in Clapham Junction. Love The original Hakkasan location as well for Michelin stars level Chinese and stunning modern ambience.
post #55 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macallan View Post

At stop at (Swaine Adeney) Brigg is a must, especially because it is on St James's.......

The Swaine Adeney Brigg store on St James's Street is no more.

http://www.styleforum.net/t/206275/discuss-swaine-adeney-brigg-cases/120#post_5641652
post #56 of 111
You won't be missing much, TBH. The umbrellas are nice, but the shop itself was charmless. Smith, on the other hand, is an experience, a living museum that's far more vital than Brigg's new-but-sterile approach.
post #57 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post

You won't be missing much, TBH. The umbrellas are nice, but the shop itself was charmless. Smith, on the other hand, is an experience, a living museum that's far more vital than Brigg's new-but-sterile approach.

Agreed. Nothing at Brigg is done on site. They wouldnt even box an umbrella for me. Boxing and shipping an umbrella had to be done at the factory. I didn't even bother about discussing having the umbrella sized, let alone discuss bespoke.
post #58 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Yes, I think that would very interesting. We'll see how much I really get to observe, though. I don't want to pry too much; also my wife will be with me and I cannot eat up too much time talking clothes.
Huntsman and W. Bill sound like good contenders. In fact, W. Bill is a must for me--I am determined to find a plain, large scale shepherd check tweed.
My hesitation with shoemakers is that I am very poorly versed in shoes. I don't think I could really make very helpful commentary.
What about umbrellas? I'm hearing a lot of support for James Smith. What about Brigg? If I had to pick, which one?

If you intend to see Huntsman, consider Richard Anderson instead. Some consider RA to be the true descendants of the Huntsman tradition.

Are any of the Hunstman cutters there trained in the Huntsman tradition? My impression was that many left during th Haste years.
post #59 of 111
If you have time to leave the West End, I would investigate contemporary fabrics at Dashing Tweeds or vintage accessories at Old Hat.
post #60 of 111
if you get thirsty, have a pint of Fuellers at the Red Lion on York St, right off of Jermyn, adjacent to Trumpers.
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