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When you should go bespoke

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Blackhood, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

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    I am sure such will not happen in your operation.
     
  2. Millerp

    Millerp Senior member

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    Even in England and Italy where there may be more of a demand for bespoke, fewer and fewer native born young men and women are interested in taking up custom tailoring as a profession.
    If anything, future custom tailors will come from Asia and other third world areas where young people still consider cutting and sewing a reasonable trade.
     
  3. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

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    I believe it is the other way round, there are growing interests in tailoring professions amongst the younger generations. This is especially true in England.
    In the next generation, it will be a great difficulty to find any competent young Asian tailors, with the adverse stigma of being a tailor in Asia. Especially in Hong Kong.
     
  4. OxxfordSJLINY

    OxxfordSJLINY Senior member

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    What you said about growing interests in tailoring professions amongst the younger generation is just as true in Italy as it is in England (according to research that I have done).

    Other than Japan (where there are just as much in the way of growing interests in tailoring professions amongst the younger generation as there are in England and Italy), I completely agree with you about Asia, especially Hong Kong. Many times, you and I and many other people on SF and the other fashion and style message boards have said the same things that you and I are saying.

    You and I (and many other people at the places that I spoke of above) are 100% correct, about everything we all said, add911_11. You and I (and many other people) don't have to merely believe this. According to reserach I (and, apparently, you and many other people at the places that I spoke of above) have done many times, it is fact.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  5. rudals1281

    rudals1281 Senior member

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    ...but...but we Asian can do anything better than the barbarians!
    Just kidding. I get that in countries like China, tailors may be looked down upon because their parents want them to become doctors, lawyers, etc. I am not Chinese so correct me if I am wrong. But in countries like Korea, I see that kids are pursuing what they want to do. I have a cousin who makes shoes (unfortunately girl shoes). She went to some school in France and started designing and making her own shoes...to sell, and other friends who are in the tailor business.
     
  6. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    At least in Naples, the growing interest in tailoring among young people is directly related the complete nosedive of every other industry.

    It's important to keep track of what period you're comparing to. If you're comparing SR now to, say, 20 years ago, they're probably producing more suits now. Compared to interwar years, not even close, and they probably will never again get close to what they were producing then.

    Also consider that there used to be much more to the bespoke world than just London and Naples. In cities like New York and LA, or DC, even towns like StL, you used to have plenty of good local options. No longer.
     
  7. rudals1281

    rudals1281 Senior member

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    Hello there fellow Washingtonian. So where's a good tailor in our area? I am interested in some bespoke since everybody here thinks that I am nuts for paying full retail on everything I buy.
     
  8. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    William Field in Georgetown is very good in my opinion. Check out the interview with him in my signature, and go by and have a chat with him. He's a great guy and will be happy to talk to you. Call first to make an appt. He'll be on vacation for a couple wks starting Aug 12 though.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. rudals1281

    rudals1281 Senior member

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    Thanks!
     
  10. OxxfordSJLINY

    OxxfordSJLINY Senior member

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    In Naples and all other cities it Italy (among them, Florence, Milan and Rome), each as much as Naples, the growing interest in tailoring among young people is 1/2 related to the complete nosedive of every other industry (the other 1/2 is to keep up with extremely strong demand). A lot of people on SF and the other fashion and styles message boards always talk about Naples but often ignore all other Italian cities (even Florence, Milan and Rome) when it comes to Italian bespoke accessory, clothing and shoe making.


    I agree with you about Savile Row tailors' production now to interwar years and the minimal local options for good bespoke in NYC, LA, DC and StL, you are spot on with all of that, unbelragazzo. However, bespoke accessory clothing and shoe makers throughout Italy have the same production as they have always had (and probably always will have). A few of them (Ambrosi, Liverano & Liverano, Panico, Pirozzi, Solito and one in Milan that I forget the name of) actually have (and will always have) higher production than ever before, which is why they are traveling the world two months out of the whole year each year (which they just started doing in the last 2 to 5 years). Again, you (like many other people people on SF and the other fashion and styles message boards) are forgetting that in each city in Italy (especially Florence, Milan and Rome) other than Naples, just as much as Naples and London in England that have plenty of god local options for all bespoke accessories, clothing and shoes.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  11. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I think you're confusing cause and effect. Those tailors are traveling because there's demand abroad. Then they come back and produce the suits that we're ordered. They dont travel because they produce more. They produce more because they travel. They've moved to the model that Savile Row has moved to over the years as well, which is to produce a majority of their clothing for export.

    The ones that don't have foreign customers aren't doing nearly as well. I don't know the Milanese and Roman markets as well, but you're probably right that they've got more bench tailors than NYC and DC.
     
  12. OxxfordSJLINY

    OxxfordSJLINY Senior member

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    For all bespoke accessories, clothing and shoes, each of the major Metropolitan Italian markets (such as Florence, Milan and Rome), outside of house style (where house style is applicable) are exactly the same as the Neapolitan market.

    Each bespoke accessory, clothing and shoe maker in Italy that doesn't have foreign customers has an annual volume of 1,500 (men only and women only) or 3,000 (½ for men, ½ for women) garments and copies other products (such as pieces of jewelry for bespoke jewelry makers, for example) per year.

    Due to the absence of demand from foreigners, these Italian bespoke makers want to keep their annual production volumes this low to maintain or improve upon their generally already exemplary overall quality and service. This is precisely the way these makers like it. They very strongly disbelieve in the model that Savile Row has moved to over the years (which, as you said before, is to produce a majority of their clothing and other products for export).
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  13. steveabdn

    steveabdn Senior member

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    I'd like to go for a bespoke option in the future,

    At the moment I'm too heavy to warrant it, I want to have achieved my goals and as a reward have a suit made to celebrate the occasion. I'm willing to spend between 2 & 4k - is this likely to be enough or would I be better buying something like a Zegna suit and having it tailored (if possible, I'm a very odd shape! Once I am back to my fighting weight of 220lbs I'm a 48" chest and a 32" waist, oh and I'm 5' 10" but have an armspan of 6' 3")

    Just looking at those numbers I'm thinking bespoke is the only way to go!!
     
  14. rudals1281

    rudals1281 Senior member

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    Yes, you shouldn't shell out such large amount of cash only to take it to a tailor and have it fitted again. Definitely go bespoke.
     
  15. steveabdn

    steveabdn Senior member

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    Thanks for the advice,

    Can I ask, I haven't bought very many high end OTR suits in the past and any that I have are often paired with a certain size of trousers - does anyone have any advice on brands that don't do this? I may be able to get down to a 46" chest but the trousers to go with that are normally 38" or so, I'd like to pair that with 34 or 32
     
  16. rudals1281

    rudals1281 Senior member

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    I am no expert but from my own experience most of the ones that I've seen have a DROP 8, meaning if you buy a 46R then your trouser size will be 46 minus 8 which is 38. If you'd like to go to 34, that sounds to me like a lot of alteration. I hope others can chime in for a better advice.
     
  17. steveabdn

    steveabdn Senior member

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    Yeah this is the sort of scenario I was used to

    Hugo Boss used to have a line of separates but there was never anything exciting in there, it's pretty frustrating! I'm really jealous of guys like you (38R from the other thread!) who can see something and know they can have it.

    The world of style is a smaller one when you're dimensioned like an ape!
     
  18. rudals1281

    rudals1281 Senior member

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    I would actually seek out a Brooks Brothers and go talk to one of their tailors. They have better service than some of these "Italian" places. And don't waste your money on Hugo Boss. As bad of a brand homer I am, I know their stuff is of bad quality for what they charge.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  19. steveabdn

    steveabdn Senior member

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    Had a check and they do have a store in Edinburgh,

    I'm planning a trip down there once I get rid of some beef anyway so this could work in well, at the moment I'm around a 52" chest and a 40" waist so I'm not even starting to look seriously

    Edit - Thanks again for the advice, much appreciated
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2013
  20. Blackhood

    Blackhood Senior member

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    At that kind of price level it's worth remembering at Charles Tyrwhytt and T M Lewin both sell separates (jacket and trouser in what ever size you like). The quality is orders of magnitude better than Boss (I know this from experience having done work for all three companies) and the price is a damn sight more honest.
     

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