what kind of television do you have or want to have?

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by faustian bargain, Apr 3, 2006.

  1. von Rothbart

    von Rothbart Senior member

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    Next generation of flat panel HDTV using laser technology is just around the corner. Colors are more vibrant and deeper, images more life-like, more energy efficient, the screen is thinner and lighter and the elimination of frame around the screen.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  2. rdawson808

    rdawson808 Senior member

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    Sorry, but I just can't bring myself to spend that much money on a tv. Even if I had the money I wouldn't.

    bob
     


  3. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    I used to play video games on my plasma and 95% of my source material is in 4:3. I use the intellegent zoom mode on the TV to stretch the image to 16:9. It would take days of having the same image on the screen to leave some sort of ghost or burn in image. The latest generation plasmas are even less susceptible to burn in.

    LCDs are fine but I prefer plasmas because of the rich, vibrant, life-like colors and as well as deeper blacks. LCD are also a more expensive than plasmas of comparable size though the price gap is shrinking.


    That's absurd. Really, I don't understand people trying to sell the concept of watching 4:3 material on a 16:9 TV by stretching the picture to a level of distortion, which completely ruins the intentions of the cinematographer. If you have to stretch the 4:3 picture to fit the 16:9 screen to avoid burn-in from the black bars, than your TV is susceptible to burn-in.

    For deep blacks, if I were in the market for a TV I would get an SXRD TV.

    Jon.
     


  4. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    Next generation of flat panel HDTV using laser technology is just around the corner. Colors are more vibrant and deeper, images more life-like, more energy efficient, the screen is thinner and lighter and the elimination of frame around the screen.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Can't log into the NYT, please copy and paste article.

    Thanks!

    Jon.
     


  5. von Rothbart

    von Rothbart Senior member

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    Here you go:

     


  6. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    Plasmas are about as susceptible to burn-in as CRTs --- that issue has been totally exaggerated. I'd break down the pros and cons of LCDs and plasmas like this:

    Plasmas:
    Pros: Relatively affordable, large sizes available, large viewing angle, decent black levels, nice colors, no motion lag
    Cons: Heavy, power consumption goes up linearly with display area

    LCDs:
    Pros: technology of the future, light, low-power
    Cons: terrible black levels, small viewing angle, motion lag, expensive, small

    These are for direct view comparisons. Rear-projection LCDs have their own set of issues. There's no perfect TV set: it's just a matter of what compromises you're willing to live with.

    Plasma TVs also have a screen shift function so that when you're watching 4:3 material, the borders will shift a few pixels left and right every so often to spread out the effect of the sharp border of the pillar boxing.

    --Andre
     


  7. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    Plasmas are about as susceptible to burn-in as CRTs --- that issue has been totally exaggerated. I'd break down the pros and cons of LCDs and plasmas like this:

    Plasmas:
    Pros: Relatively affordable, large sizes available, large viewing angle, decent black levels, nice colors, no motion lag
    Cons: Heavy, power consumption goes up linearly with display area

    LCDs:
    Pros: technology of the future, light, low-power
    Cons: terrible black levels, small viewing angle, motion lag, expensive, small

    These are for direct view comparisons. Rear-projection LCDs have their own set of issues. There's no perfect TV set: it's just a matter of what compromises you're willing to live with.

    Plasma TVs also have a screen shift function so that when you're watching 4:3 material, the borders will shift a few pixels left and right every so often to spread out the effect of the sharp border of the pillar boxing.

    --Andre



    My Rear-projection LCD has no image blur. And you can get the black level / contrast looking pretty good as long as you set the settings the right way.

    However, if someone is thinking of a big screen TV from Sony, get the SXRD, it's awesome!

    Jon.
     


  8. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    Here you go:

    Thanks.

    Jon.
     


  9. zjpj83

    zjpj83 Senior member

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    Yeah, my Pioneer is plasma.

    My brother in law told me whoever makes the glass for all these screens (or something like that - I'm probably telling the story wrong) is going to be able to do so more cheaply, or there are going to be more manufacturers, or something like that. In any event, the result is going to be prices are going to drop on these flat panel thingys sometime soon in the future.
     


  10. Earthmover

    Earthmover Senior member

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    This is the TV I have, except that it's in a 50". It's the same model with the same stand from Costco:

    http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product...opnav=&browse=

    I really like it. After all the viewing angle, burn-in, black levels, etc. that you hear when buying a large TV, I decided to just ignore everyone and go see what their screens were like. The Sony rear LCDs had great color and brightness, good price, and were light (~90 pounds; I can lift it by myself easily if I get a good grip). I've had it for six months, and not one complaint. It has great picture quality, and that's all I ever wanted in a TV. So if anyone wants a simple solution, I highly recommend it. I think it's about ~1800 at some internet outlets now.
     


  11. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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  12. edmorel

    edmorel Quality Seller!! Dubiously Honored

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    The three major big screen technologies all have their plusses and minus right now, like everything else in life. I currently own an HP (yes, as in Hewlett Packard) 1080p 65" DLP. I (nor anyone else in my family or visitors who have seen the TV) don't suffer the rainbow problem, so that is not an issue. Most high def TV's have mediocre standard definition, so if you are going to be watching a lot of regular TV, the high def will do nothing for you and you might be better off waiting. Other issues are space, money, ventilation, lighting etc. avscience.com has a great forum where they cover pretty much every TV and technology in existence. I would read as much as I could and ask questions.

    The HP was the most aligned with my needs. I was watching "The SpongeBob SquarePants" movie with my son on Showtime high definition and I've never seen a clearer, sharper picture in my life. Same thing for the NCAA tourney on CBSHD. I was able to see a whitehead on one of the UCLA player's face [​IMG]

    P.S. also, if you make the couple of thousand investment in a high def TV, spend a couple of hundred on professional calibration.
     


  13. mbc

    mbc Senior member

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  14. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    The three major big screen technologies all have their plusses and minus right now, like everything else in life. I currently own an HP (yes, as in Hewlett Packard) 1080p 65" DLP. I (nor anyone else in my family or visitors who have seen the TV) don't suffer the rainbow problem, so that is not an issue. Most high def TV's have mediocre standard definition, so if you are going to be watching a lot of regular TV, the high def will do nothing for you and you might be better off waiting. Other issues are space, money, ventilation, lighting etc. avscience.com has a great forum where they cover pretty much every TV and technology in existence. I would read as much as I could and ask questions.

    The HP was the most aligned with my needs. I was watching "The SpongeBob SquarePants" movie with my son on Showtime high definition and I've never seen a clearer, sharper picture in my life. Same thing for the NCAA tourney on CBSHD. I was able to see a whitehead on one of the UCLA player's face [​IMG]

    P.S. also, if you make the couple of thousand investment in a high def TV, spend a couple of hundred on professional calibration.


    No one in my immediate family sees rainbows either, but alas I do. I guess my mind is not fooled by the optical illusion. When 3-chip DLP comes out, it will probably be the best rear-projection system in the world. Until then, I think SXRD has the crown.

    Jon.
     


  15. romafan

    romafan Senior member

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    I have no idea what many of you guys are talking about [​IMG]

    We have a small (14", 16"?) Sony trinitron, no cable - no complaints. It's hooked up to a VCR/DVD player to watch movies.

    Can anyone tell me about the change that is supposed to occur soon regarding TV broadcasting - not sure how to term it, but something to do w/ the type of broadcast signal & a special TV you need to revceive it...
     


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