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what kind of television do you have or want to have?

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by faustian bargain, Apr 3, 2006.

  1. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    Plasmas are about as susceptible to burn-in as CRTs --- that issue has been totally exaggerated. I'd break down the pros and cons of LCDs and plasmas like this:

    Plasmas:
    Pros: Relatively affordable, large sizes available, large viewing angle, decent black levels, nice colors, no motion lag
    Cons: Heavy, power consumption goes up linearly with display area

    LCDs:
    Pros: technology of the future, light, low-power
    Cons: terrible black levels, small viewing angle, motion lag, expensive, small

    These are for direct view comparisons. Rear-projection LCDs have their own set of issues. There's no perfect TV set: it's just a matter of what compromises you're willing to live with.

    Plasma TVs also have a screen shift function so that when you're watching 4:3 material, the borders will shift a few pixels left and right every so often to spread out the effect of the sharp border of the pillar boxing.

    --Andre
     
  2. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    Plasmas are about as susceptible to burn-in as CRTs --- that issue has been totally exaggerated. I'd break down the pros and cons of LCDs and plasmas like this:

    Plasmas:
    Pros: Relatively affordable, large sizes available, large viewing angle, decent black levels, nice colors, no motion lag
    Cons: Heavy, power consumption goes up linearly with display area

    LCDs:
    Pros: technology of the future, light, low-power
    Cons: terrible black levels, small viewing angle, motion lag, expensive, small

    These are for direct view comparisons. Rear-projection LCDs have their own set of issues. There's no perfect TV set: it's just a matter of what compromises you're willing to live with.

    Plasma TVs also have a screen shift function so that when you're watching 4:3 material, the borders will shift a few pixels left and right every so often to spread out the effect of the sharp border of the pillar boxing.

    --Andre



    My Rear-projection LCD has no image blur. And you can get the black level / contrast looking pretty good as long as you set the settings the right way.

    However, if someone is thinking of a big screen TV from Sony, get the SXRD, it's awesome!

    Jon.
     
  3. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    Here you go:

    Thanks.

    Jon.
     
  4. zjpj83

    zjpj83 Senior member

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    Yeah, my Pioneer is plasma.

    My brother in law told me whoever makes the glass for all these screens (or something like that - I'm probably telling the story wrong) is going to be able to do so more cheaply, or there are going to be more manufacturers, or something like that. In any event, the result is going to be prices are going to drop on these flat panel thingys sometime soon in the future.
     
  5. Earthmover

    Earthmover Senior member

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    This is the TV I have, except that it's in a 50". It's the same model with the same stand from Costco:

    http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product...opnav=&browse=

    I really like it. After all the viewing angle, burn-in, black levels, etc. that you hear when buying a large TV, I decided to just ignore everyone and go see what their screens were like. The Sony rear LCDs had great color and brightness, good price, and were light (~90 pounds; I can lift it by myself easily if I get a good grip). I've had it for six months, and not one complaint. It has great picture quality, and that's all I ever wanted in a TV. So if anyone wants a simple solution, I highly recommend it. I think it's about ~1800 at some internet outlets now.
     
  6. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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  7. edmorel

    edmorel Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The three major big screen technologies all have their plusses and minus right now, like everything else in life. I currently own an HP (yes, as in Hewlett Packard) 1080p 65" DLP. I (nor anyone else in my family or visitors who have seen the TV) don't suffer the rainbow problem, so that is not an issue. Most high def TV's have mediocre standard definition, so if you are going to be watching a lot of regular TV, the high def will do nothing for you and you might be better off waiting. Other issues are space, money, ventilation, lighting etc. avscience.com has a great forum where they cover pretty much every TV and technology in existence. I would read as much as I could and ask questions.

    The HP was the most aligned with my needs. I was watching "The SpongeBob SquarePants" movie with my son on Showtime high definition and I've never seen a clearer, sharper picture in my life. Same thing for the NCAA tourney on CBSHD. I was able to see a whitehead on one of the UCLA player's face [​IMG]

    P.S. also, if you make the couple of thousand investment in a high def TV, spend a couple of hundred on professional calibration.
     
  8. mbc

    mbc Senior member

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  9. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    The three major big screen technologies all have their plusses and minus right now, like everything else in life. I currently own an HP (yes, as in Hewlett Packard) 1080p 65" DLP. I (nor anyone else in my family or visitors who have seen the TV) don't suffer the rainbow problem, so that is not an issue. Most high def TV's have mediocre standard definition, so if you are going to be watching a lot of regular TV, the high def will do nothing for you and you might be better off waiting. Other issues are space, money, ventilation, lighting etc. avscience.com has a great forum where they cover pretty much every TV and technology in existence. I would read as much as I could and ask questions.

    The HP was the most aligned with my needs. I was watching "The SpongeBob SquarePants" movie with my son on Showtime high definition and I've never seen a clearer, sharper picture in my life. Same thing for the NCAA tourney on CBSHD. I was able to see a whitehead on one of the UCLA player's face [​IMG]

    P.S. also, if you make the couple of thousand investment in a high def TV, spend a couple of hundred on professional calibration.


    No one in my immediate family sees rainbows either, but alas I do. I guess my mind is not fooled by the optical illusion. When 3-chip DLP comes out, it will probably be the best rear-projection system in the world. Until then, I think SXRD has the crown.

    Jon.
     
  10. romafan

    romafan Senior member

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    I have no idea what many of you guys are talking about [​IMG]

    We have a small (14", 16"?) Sony trinitron, no cable - no complaints. It's hooked up to a VCR/DVD player to watch movies.

    Can anyone tell me about the change that is supposed to occur soon regarding TV broadcasting - not sure how to term it, but something to do w/ the type of broadcast signal & a special TV you need to revceive it...
     
  11. edmorel

    edmorel Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    No one in my immediate family sees rainbows either, but alas I do. I guess my mind is not fooled by the optical illusion. When 3-chip DLP comes out, it will probably be the best rear-projection system in the world. Until then, I think SXRD has the crown.

    Jon.


    Different strokes and all that. Is the SXRD 1080p or 1080i?, I don't remember. Sony SXRD has the best standard def. picture, hands down (which is no small feat on a high def TV). I would gladly duel the man who claims that the Sony high def picture is better than my HP DLP [​IMG] , which is true 1080p by the way, not that there is any 1080p programming. Anyway, once you are up at Sony/HP level in TV's, it is like picking between Kiton and Borrelli.
     
  12. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    I have no idea what many of you guys are talking about [​IMG]

    We have a small (14", 16"?) Sony trinitron, no cable - no complaints. It's hooked up to a VCR/DVD player to watch movies.

    Can anyone tell me about the change that is supposed to occur soon regarding TV broadcasting - not sure how to term it, but something to do w/ the type of broadcast signal & a special TV you need to revceive it...


    LOL. I had no idea what people were talking about either until I started to do research when our old 50" rear-projection CRT blew-up. But, hours of research later and I have a fairly good idea of what I am talking about.

    Anyways...yes, they are supposed to switch cable TV broadcasts to HDTV, which runs on higher frequencies than regular TV (the frequencies currently used by cable providers will be used for other purposes). They (Congress) originally made legislation that by a certain date all the TV signals had to be transferred to HDTV, but they keep on pushing the date...so who knows when it will really happen?

    The biggest difference between HDTV and regular TV is the quality 720 or 1080 lines, either interlaced together or progressive and the size of the images: 16:9 (1.78:1) widescreen for HDTV vs. 4:3 for regular TV.

    Jon.
     
  13. imageWIS

    imageWIS Senior member

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    Different strokes and all that. Is the SXRD 1080p or 1080i?, I don't remember. Sony SXRD has the best standard def. picture, hands down (which is no small feat on a high def TV). I would gladly duel the man who claims that the Sony high def picture is better than my HP DLP [​IMG] , which is true 1080p by the way, not that there is any 1080p programming. Anyway, once you are up at Sony/HP level in TV's, it is like picking between Kiton and Borrelli.

    SXRD is 1080p, actually ALL digital technologies are progressive, only non-digital technologies run interlaced, i.e. HDTV rear CRT-tube screens, etc...

    Mine at home is 720p, and since there is no 1080p cable programming (and there is a good chance there never will be) it works just fine.

    DLP will be the best tech out there once the 3-chip system hits homes, in the meantime, check out your local "ňúdigital' movie theater that uses 3-chip DLP technology and be prepared to be amazed.

    Jon.
     
  14. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    I'm not that much a television-phile, so I have a 24" Sony flat screen CRT. I think paying a lot of money for a television is a little sad.
     
  15. edmorel

    edmorel Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    SXRD is 1080p, actually ALL digital technologies are progressive, only non-digital technologies run interlaced, i.e. HDTV rear CRT-tube screens, etc...


    Jon.


    This is news to me. My understanding is that only the HP, Sony's SXRD and the JVC version of the SXRD technology are 1080p. The LCD and DLP offerings that are out there from the various brands are 1080 lines interlaced. Not looking for a debate, as I am extremely happy with what I have, but I've read differently or at least interpreted what I've read differently.
     
  16. edmorel

    edmorel Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'm not that much a television-phile, so I have a 24" Sony flat screen CRT. I think paying a lot of money for a television is a little sad.

    Think about all the things that are talked about here ($6,000 suits, $2,000 shoes etc). You think that some people might think it sad that someone spends that much money on those items? [​IMG]
     
  17. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    Think about all the things that are talked about here ($6,000 suits, $2,000 shoes etc). You think that some people might think it sad that someone spends that much money on those items? [​IMG]

    It did cross my mind, but I never said I owned any of the above!
     
  18. faustian bargain

    faustian bargain Senior member

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    if you have a lot of money, then a lot of money isn't a lot of money.

    ...

    here's what i found on the avsforum regarding plasma burn-in:

    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=608677

    it's a long thread that's a couple years deep, but the first post has some reference info. the last page has current posts.
     
  19. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    The LCD and DLP offerings that are out there from the various brands are 1080 lines interlaced.

    It depends. Sharp has a 1080p LCD, and there are plasmas that can do 1080p. There aren't really 1080i digital display devices, but most are 720p. They do deinterlacing and scaling of varying quality from 1080i to 720p to display 1080i pictures. 1080p is worth it if you are going to spend another $2K or so to get a video processor that can properly deinterlace 1080i to 1080p (eg. Lumagen VideoHDP), but there aren't many out there, yet. If you watch 1080sF24 material, most of which are popular movies, then a 1080p set may be worth it as well if it properly decodes it.

    --Andre
     
  20. whoopee

    whoopee Senior member

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    The Predictas are rather appealing.
     

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