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shirt collar: to fuse or not to fuse?

ollie

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can anyone tell me the advantages of fused and none-fused shirt collar inlays? despite from a difference while ironing and more "fullness" in the none-fused ones what speaks for the one or the other method?

thank you
 

grimslade

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Fused collars are stiffer and so easier to press and easier to make look "neat." Unfused are old skool.
 

Lucky Strike

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Fused shirts collars can also "bubble", in the same way as fused suits. I avoid them.
 

Kent Wang

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Is the fusing material the same as in suit jackets?
 
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Fused collars and cuffs are not the way to go if you are paying serious money for your shirts. You will get a stiffer collar and cuff by going the fused route, but the shirt won't last, especially if you get the shirt starched. The better shirt makers such as Turnbull & Asser(and of course my shirts)are never fused. Ultimately it's up to you go with fusing, the same way way it's a decision to go with fused suits vs. all handmade canvas suits. If you want to really get your dollar's worth and have something that can stand the test of time(8 to 10 years if cared for properly)go with the non-fusible collar, often called swiss interlinings. They are sewn down similar to the way canvas in sewn down on suits. You should be able to take a collar and cuff and rub the fabric between your fingers. The fabric should sort of pull away not stay glued(fused)to one side.
 

Jovan

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Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
Fused shirts collars can also "bubble", in the same way as fused suits. I avoid them.
Hasn't happened to my shirts yet.
 

grimslade

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Originally Posted by Jovan
Hasn't happened to my shirts yet.


Unfused is no doubt better in some cosmic sense. But I have also never had shirt-collar fusing give out before the rest of the shirt needed replacing anyway.
 

Teacher

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Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
Fused shirts collars can also "bubble", in the same way as fused suits. I avoid them.

True, but unfused collars can pucker. With their respective methods, bubbling and puckering are far less likely with quality materials and workmanship.
 

Teacher

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Originally Posted by bespoke couture
Fused collars and cuffs are not the way to go if you are paying serious money for your shirts. You will get a stiffer collar and cuff by going the fused route, but the shirt won't last, especially if you get the shirt starched. The better shirt makers such as Turnbull & Asser(and of course my shirts)are never fused. Ultimately it's up to you go with fusing, the same way way it's a decision to go with fused suits vs. all handmade canvas suits. If you want to really get your dollar's worth and have something that can stand the test of time(8 to 10 years if cared for properly)go with the non-fusible collar, often called swiss interlinings. They are sewn down similar to the way canvas in sewn down on suits. You should be able to take a collar and cuff and rub the fabric between your fingers. The fabric should sort of pull away not stay glued(fused)to one side.

A number of bespoke and high-end makers, including our esteemed Mr. Kabbaz, use fusing (not exclusively, but certainly commonly).

EDIT: Ah, I see I was beaten to the punch.
 

Cantabrigian

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I prefer the fuller look of a non-fused collar and think they feel much more comfortable.

I would recommend, however, getting a fused collar when it comes to very soft materials like royal oxford.

As a matter of course, when I get an unfused collar, I ask the shirtmaker to use an interlining of medium thickness or greater to make sure the collar has some shape.
 

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