Italian vs British vs American cut

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by godson, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. godson

    godson New Member

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    Can someone kindly explain in detail what the difference are between those three cuts.

    All help are appreciated
     


  2. gumercindo

    gumercindo Senior member

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    In the RTW world, this varies by manufacturer. Some Italian cuts are cut differently than others. Same goes for Brit and American.
     


  3. i killed judas.

    i killed judas. Senior member

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    Are we talking suits?

    If so, then there are people who know much more than me here, albeit I am only 22 years old.

    But, briefly:

    Italian: very slim, very trendy, double vented, narrow lapels, low button stance (see RLBL); this is what you wear when you go out to a classy place and want to get laid
    American: terrible is the only thing that comes to mind. Unvented, baggy, etc etc
    English: Fits very well, fairly conservative, great for the CEO's (see RLPL)
     


  4. godson

    godson New Member

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    Yes i am talking about suits
     


  5. Tibo

    Tibo Senior member

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    Are we talking suits?

    If so, then there are people who know much more than me here, albeit I am only 22 years old.

    But, briefly:

    Italian: very slim, very trendy, double vented, narrow lapels, low button stance (see RLBL); this is what you wear when you go out to a classy place and want to get laid
    American: terrible is the only thing that comes to mind. Unvented, baggy, etc etc
    English: Fits very well, fairly conservative, great for the CEO's (see RLPL)


    /thread
     


  6. Sir James

    Sir James Well-Known Member

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    Italian - are generally cut a slimmer mor close to the body. The suits are usually lighter wieght matching the climate conditions. The jackets tend to be side vented with stuctured shoulders, some such as Corneliani has veavily padded shoulders. the pants are cut slim but are not sevearly tappered.

    British - Most have padded shoulders with slight waist supression, not as much as the Italian suits. The cut is sume what fuller but not as much as the Continental. the pants are usually very tapered at the botom.

    American - Fuller cut suit with more drape. The shoulders are usually natural with minium padding. The jackets are tend to be single vented with a more boxy overall shape. The pants are also more fuller cut throught.

    The american sack suit, popularized by BB is a full cut suits with no darts, single vented with natural shoulders.
     


  7. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Italian: very slim, very trendy, double vented, narrow lapels, low button stance (see RLBL); this is what you wear when you go out to a classy place and want to get laid
    American: terrible is the only thing that comes to mind. Unvented, baggy, etc etc
    English: Fits very well, fairly conservative, great for the CEO's (see RLPL)


    Italian - are generally cut a slimmer mor close to the body. The suits are usually lighter wieght matching the climate conditions. The jackets tend to be side vented with stuctured shoulders, some such as Corneliani has veavily padded shoulders. the pants are cut slim but are not sevearly tappered.

    British - Most have padded shoulders with slight waist supression, not as much as the Italian suits. The cut is sume what fuller but not as much as the Continental. the pants are usually very tapered at the botom.

    American - Fuller cut suit with more drape. The shoulders are usually natural with minium padding. The jackets are tend to be single vented with a more boxy overall shape. The pants are also more fuller cut throught.

    The american sack suit, popularized by BB is a full cut suits with no darts, single vented with natural shoulders.


    Holy leaping generalizations, Batman!
     


  8. KObalto

    KObalto Senior member

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    I thought classic Italian was no vents and English was single vent (ala riding clothes)? [​IMG]
     


  9. Ich_Dien

    Ich_Dien Senior member

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    I thought classic English was dual vent...
     


  10. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    [​IMG] It's going to be a long day!
     


  11. Bellum

    Bellum Senior member

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    Are we talking suits?

    If so, then there are people who know much more than me here, albeit I am only 22 years old.


    You should've just stopped right there.
     


  12. KObalto

    KObalto Senior member

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    [​IMG] It's going to be a long day!

    Oh come on, Despos! Don't just sit there on the couch watching. Throw a little of your wisdom our way. [​IMG]
     


  13. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Holy leaping generalizations, Batman!
    +1 The reality of it is, there is no 'three cuts' for american, english or Italian, that are so stark in their differences that you could classify them so simply. There are aspects of each that could lead you in a direction, but what has been said above isnt exactly representative of those styles. 'padded shoulders', i tried on an Armani Jacket the other day, and i have two Canali's and a Zegna, they all have padded shoulders, for a strong shoulder line, and they're all Italian.
     


  14. Chips

    Chips Senior member

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    I really want to mess with things then, cause if I could have a bespoke suit made, I'd go for high armholes, more fitted, peak lapels, and a soft natural shoulder along with good waist suppression. So not sure if this would fit into any particular camp.

    I believe I've seen a few nice examples of a grey herringbone Cornelliani suit that exemplified this, although the shoulders appeared more padded than I'd probably like.
     


  15. Nicola

    Nicola Senior member

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    +1


    The reality of it is, there is no 'three cuts' for american, english or Italian, that are so stark in their differences that you could classify them so simply. There are aspects of each that could lead you in a direction, but what has been said above isnt exactly representative of those styles.

    'padded shoulders', i tried on an Armani Jacket the other day, and i have two Canali's and a Zegna, they all have padded shoulders, for a strong shoulder line, and they're all Italian.


    It's worse then that isn't it? Zegna has three different cuts . Roma,Milano and the Traveller cut of odd jackets. Which would be the more Italian?
     


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