Anna Matuozzo Prices

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by UK2004, Feb 7, 2008.

  1. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Also, if you are perceived as being too commercial by yours peers. You are not the real deal. Then you get labeled a marketer, merchandiser, retailer, everything but a tradesman/ shopkeeper.
     
  2. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    I have no idea, but also keep in mind that people who are working artisans generally have a sort of bitterness towards a success like Battistoni. It is the same I have heard towards the Caraceni and Rubinacci. Also, they all sort of work in little guilds where they refer to eachother. To get a real answer, you have to push a little.

    Interesting. I prefer my Matuozzo shirts because they're a bit more 'special', but I admit the Battistoni shirts I saw were extremely neat looking and seemed equally nice in their own way. The finishing on the back of the collars was quite unique: the interlining is open and visible across most of the collar, with fabric only closing over the sides. The swelled edges of the collar were very pronounced and substantial. Lots of handsewing is available, but priced separately.
     
  3. coolpapa

    coolpapa Senior member

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    I have no idea, but also keep in mind that people who are working artisans generally have a sort of bitterness towards a success like Battistoni. It is the same I have heard towards the Caraceni and Rubinacci. Also, they all sort of work in little guilds where they refer to eachother. To get a real answer, you have to push a little.

    +1

    I was taken aback at the reaction I received when I brought up the name Borrelli a couple of times last fall.
     
  4. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    ~350 euros, regardless of fabric choice.

    YIKES. I mean, I know the work by hand is considerable, and there time consuming and costly, but yeesh.
     
  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    YIKES. I mean, I know the work by hand is considerable, and there time consuming and costly, but yeesh.
    Worth it or not worth it is one thing, but it is not just the handwork on her shirts that makes them special. Quality costs money, for the most part.
     
  6. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    Worth it or not worth it is one thing, but it is not just the handwork on her shirts that makes them special. Quality costs money, for the most part.

    True. But the handwork must certainly add to the cost, or at least help justify it in some buyers minds.

    I tend to think of shirts as a little too disposable to justify the top end. My outlay for them has quadrupled now that I've gone from Jantzen to Geneva, but I'm still only paying 1/3 of the cost of A.M. Horses for courses, I guess. Or maybe here it would be shirtmakers for dandies.
     
  7. Miguel Alvarez

    Miguel Alvarez Senior member

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    We are talking about her bespoke shirts, aren't we? Does she even offer MTM?
     
  8. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    . . . .I tend to think of shirts as a little too disposable to justify the top end. My outlay for them has quadrupled now that I've gone from Jantzen to Geneva, but I'm still only paying 1/3 of the cost of A.M. Horses for courses, I guess. Or maybe here it would be shirtmakers for dandies.
    I am in this camp as well. My existing shirtmaker has gone AWOL with unfilled orders over a year old and now unreturned phone calls. Fortunately, I still have a few unpacked shirts and have also been supplementing with BB and Press RTW for weekends. But I am going to have to make a switch for weekday shirts soon. As much as the hobbyist in me wants to trade up as I order new shirts, it is going to be tough to justify.
     
  9. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    True. But the handwork must certainly add to the cost, or at least help justify it in some buyers minds. I tend to think of shirts as a little too disposable to justify the top end. My outlay for them has quadrupled now that I've gone from Jantzen to Geneva, but I'm still only paying 1/3 of the cost of A.M. Horses for courses, I guess. Or maybe here it would be shirtmakers for dandies.
    I expect 15 years from a shirt, so for me they are not disposable. Now I just have to not get fat, and don't you call me a dandy [​IMG].
    I am in this camp as well. My existing shirtmaker has gone AWOL with unfilled orders over a year old and now unreturned phone calls. Fortunately, I still have a few unpacked shirts and have also been supplementing with BB and Press RTW for weekends. But I am going to have to make a switch for weekday shirts soon. As much as the hobbyist in me wants to trade up as I order new shirts, it is going to be tough to justify.
    You should switch to Kabbaz for the next batch. I am considering some Mercer shirts for casual.
     
  10. edmorel

    edmorel Quality Seller!! Dubiously Honored

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  11. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    ^^^ Anna told me my shirts would last 10 years or so if worn regularly.
     
  12. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    How many years do you expect if you actually wear them?
    Fifteen, can't your type read? I have enough that they should last that long. I have seen older ones than that on her customers and they look great. If stitching comes apart, she told me to just send them in for repairs.
    She told me the same, but mine get good rest, and I don't mind a bit of fraying.
     
  13. dopey

    dopey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I expect 15 years from a shirt, so for me they are not disposable. Now I just have to not get fat, and don't you call me a dandy [​IMG].



    You should switch to Kabbaz for the next batch.

    I am considering some Mercer shirts for casual.


    I don't get 15 years from my shirts. More like five or six (and that will not likely improve). I would gladly try Kabbaz if the price were sub $300 (or if you underwrote the difference).
     
  14. Tomasso

    Tomasso Senior member

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    Battistoni shirts.....The swelled edges of the collar were very pronounced and substantial.
    And very difficult to maintain, even with hand pressing.
     
  15. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    And very difficult to maintain, even with hand pressing.

    Does that come personal experience? I hadn't really thought about it. My Matuozzo shirts can be kind of a pain to iron (especially the cuffs and collars), but I didn't think the swelled edges of the Battistoni collars would prove a problem.
     

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