1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. sinnedk

    sinnedk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,059
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    What's the most reliable garage door loft mechanism? I am about to switch and I know genie but is there anything better?
     
  2. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    15,829
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Location:
    People's Republic of San Francisco
    Everyone I know out here has LiftMaster.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,190
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    My current house and my last house had them. In the last house it was a decade of spotless service.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. texas_jack

    texas_jack Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    10,229
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2006
    Location:
    Hobart, IN
    

    Where is the cut off valve? Ours is inside the fireplace which renders a gas starter not possible. We were also told technically our fireplace is "unsound" since some of the liner is failing. The fireplace guy wouldn't convert it without repairing it. $4000. Pass.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. jbarwick

    jbarwick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,966
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    We were lucky to have our gas valve outside but we kept the gas fireplace instead of converting to wood. Our basement/drive in garage also has a fireplace but it is wood burning and we never use it. My sister-in-law had a similar situation where converting an "unsound" fireplace into a sound fireplace would be in the same $4-5,000 range.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. sinnedk

    sinnedk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,059
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    



    thanks a lot, assuming you guys went with belt vs chain to avoid noise
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2016
  7. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    15,829
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Location:
    People's Republic of San Francisco
    For me, the chain v belt choice is more about not having an exposed, greasy chain. The majority of the noise in operation in my installation is due to the opener's being mounted to the floor joists of the room above. It's not particularly loud, but what noise there is directly transmitted to the living space.
     
  8. dcg

    dcg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,113
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    Philly
    



    Thanks gents. Have to double check where the valve is. Home inspector gave a cursory look and said everything looks fine, but did recommend a chimney expert take a look. Closing is next Friday, at which point I'll probably become a regular in this thread.

    Moving from a 900 sq foot townhouse with no real yard to a 2,800 sq ft single family home on just over an acre
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. Mr. Moo

    Mr. Moo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    17,219
    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    

    Ah, I think we can start a club! Congrats and welcome :cheers:
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. dcg

    dcg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,113
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    Philly
    

    Was just reading back and saw your post; congrats to you as well, and thanks for the welcome!

    The similarities continue, as we're also moving from 80s construction to 30s. The good news for us is that the previous overs took wonderful care of the place. The bad news is that they're selling to move to a retirement community, and some of their paint and wallpaper choices are, shall we say, not to our taste. Can't wait to get in there and rip the carpet off the original hardwood floors in the bedrooms.
     
    2 people like this.
  11. Mr. Moo

    Mr. Moo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    17,219
    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2008
    Location:
    Bay Area, CA
    

    Oh wow, cool coincidence. Good luck with the changes - that is definitely pretty fun. But it can be a bit stressful as well... so just sip on your favorite drink over the next few months and you'll be just fine. :slayer:

    We changed our kitchen completely, blew out a wall, repainted the whole place, lots of new lighting, etc. Now we are working on getting our 4 decks redone (one down, 3 to go), and changing some things in the downstairs family room. :nodding:
     
  12. dcg

    dcg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,113
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    Philly
    

    We're fortunate that the kitchen was just redone 4 years ago with pretty high-end appliances and really nice cabinets, so that's one major expense out of the way. Most everything we want to do is superficial - paint pretty much the whole house and likely have to refinish some of the floors. The exception is the family room which will likely need new walls. We'll also be fencing some or all of the yard, and I'm somewhat terrified of what that's going to run me. And the shed is on it's last legs; fortunately we're less than an hour from Amish country, and for not much more than prefab you can bring some of their carpenters out to build you something nice.

    Yeah, you don't think there's much to do, and then you start writing it all down :)
     
  13. jbarwick

    jbarwick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,966
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    We went with the aluminum fencing that looks like wrought iron and a little under 200 linear feet ran close to $7K. Some people in our neighborhood will do a weird mix of brick and wood or aluminum like ours mixed with wood and it never looks very good.

    Has anyone repaired motar on their own and cares to comment? We have some rock based retaining walls where the motar on the top is cracking and I feel like it should be an easy job but don't know if that is the case. It would not be a structural fix, just cosmetic. I am also thinking of doing some small brick projects at the same time but again, if motar is too much of a hassle, brickwork is too.
     
  14. dcg

    dcg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,113
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Location:
    Philly
    

    I'm considering the same stuff. How high is your fence? We're probably looking at either ~250 or 650-700 linear feet, depending on how crazy we want to go.
     
  15. jbarwick

    jbarwick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,966
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Our fence is 4' but they have a lower one which could save money. Up close you can see they are held together by screws and such but it makes for easy repairs. We had a branch fall and break a picket and while wrought iron would need welding, the picket can be unscrewed and replaced easily.
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. NorCal

    NorCal Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,419
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    

    It's not that hard. Just take your time, be neat, and clean up the mortar early and often. A big ass sponge and a bucket of water are good to have on hand.

    Are you thinking of filling cracks? Or mortaring over them?
     
  17. jbarwick

    jbarwick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,966
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    I am going to fill in cracks as best as possible then on top of the wall, make it one smooth coat. The top layer had previous layers crack and the mortar chipped off so I want to smooth it out. The face of the wall does not have any cracks, just the top coat.
     
  18. NorCal

    NorCal Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,419
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2007
    That will be easier and make for a better finished product. Trying to fill cracks can be a pain as the colour will never match. Make sure you get all the old loose bits out. An old chisel can help.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2016
  19. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,069
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Mortar is easy to do--it's just really slow if you don't know the correct way to do it. Still, you can do a lot in an afternoon.

    With bricks mortar tends to leave hazy residue behind when it gets where it wasn't supposed to go, even if you diligently wash it off. You have to come back with acid to remove it. That works fine with bricks, but with rocks... maybe you need to be more careful. Certainly I wouldn't do it with, say, dyed concrete pavers, since the acid takes the finish off them. You could probably still do it, but you'd have to be really neat with the mortar and I just wasn't.

    But as far as matching the mortar, that turned out to be easy. You can dye the mortar or you can weather it afterwards pretty easily.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2016
  20. Connemara

    Connemara Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    39,486
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Update on the house: only two major projects to go before I move in. Hardwood floors need to be sanded and stained and carpet is being installed on the second floor. I'll be in by the end of the month.

    I went with Benjamin Moore Simply White for the first floor with the exception of the kitchen and bathroom. Really pleased with how it turned out. It looks quite nice both during the day and at night.
     
    4 people like this.

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by